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Author Topic: Matrix Switcher  (Read 7596 times)

Christopher Young

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2011, 03:06:37 pm »

I just read something else that is a bit annoying as well,  no more component out on Blu ray players in the very near future. Get one while you still can.  For those who were ok with the slightly lower resolution so as not to have to deal with HDCP, too bad.  I don't know how we got here, but now we have to pay big dollars to protect their content.
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jerry nuckolls

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2011, 02:27:26 pm »

Guys. Anybody know of a decently priced 4x16 HDMI matrix switcher? Thanks in advance!

I would take a look at 2 solutions:

Crestron DM (out of price range)
http://www.crestron.com

Just add power 2g series: Excellent Product at the right price.  You can create a matrix of roughly 200 i/o.  Easily expandable.

http://www.justaddpower.com
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Craig Hauber

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2011, 01:58:14 am »

what sucks is dealing with legacy systems or systems that are in the 16x32 range.  I'm finding more and more customer supplied input devices no longer have anything but HDMI and I installed component analog a few years ago when HDMI matrices were either non-existant or eye-wateringly pricey!
HDMI baluns are still sketchy in behavior with 1080p over 150'  Even with baluns using supposedly "cheap" cat series cable actually recommend thier special branded low-skew cat-7 type line at over $1/ft!
-and even then you are still fighting EDID issues that even the manufacturers scratch thier heads over.
In my opinion, HDMI is short for "time to retire and go sit on a beach somewhere" :-)

Has anyone had any success with HDfury or is there a ZVbox type product with and HDCP compliant HDMI input?

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Craig Hauber
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Brad Weber

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Re: Matrix Switcher
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2011, 09:48:07 am »

Has anyone had any success with HDfury or is there a ZVbox type product with and HDCP compliant HDMI input?
For what purpose?  The HDFury products are intended specifically to convert an analog video input into an HDCP compliant HDMI input, they are not intended for, and in the US illegal to use for such purposes, to bypass the DRM and convert HDMI to a high resolution analog signal in order to then route, distribute or record that analog signal.  There are streaming encoders with HDMI and/or DVI inputs, but I don't believe they support HDCP.
 
I actually heard the comment several times at InfoComm last week that supported the perspective that the commercial AV industry blew it in terms of HDMI, primarily in the context of not being proactive in offering or promoting a viable alternative.  This seems to be an increasing factor as 'consumer' level content creation and content sources seem to be an increasingly common element in many 'professional' and 'commercial' applications.  At the same time, many manufacturers of AV routing and distribution equipment seem to be getting much better versed at addressing HDCP and EDID issues including some creative solutions (some of which are playing in gray areas, not illegal but rather not clearly defined, regarding how they address DRM).  You also saw a number of HDBasetT and AVB based routing and distribution products being introduced.
 
One problem for professional AV applications that has become increasingly apparent is that while the HDCP requirements require content protection to be enabled when the content calls for it, nothing prohibits product manufacturers from enabling content protection at all times.  Thus you are finding some source devices, especially consumer and 'prosumer' products, that enable HDCP whether the content flags it or not.
 
Another problem I've encountered is that systems and devices that may involve HDCP can be difficult to integrate with SDI or HD-SDI based 'production' systems.  Because it essentially results in a direct digital 'copy' without the DRM, all of the HDMI-to-SDI conversion devices I've looked at will not accept HDCP encrypted content.  When you combine this with the above point it can become a real problem with some sources simply not being able to be converted regardless of the content.
 
And we haven't even touched on EDID issues such as which 'handshake' a sources gets when feeding multiple devices determines the output format and resolution from the source device.
 
Another comment that came up several times regarded that Netflix and similar media traffic now represented something like 40% of all internet traffic and is pushing much of the infrastructure of their available infrastructure as well as that of the internet providers.  This may lead to some constraints on bandwidth or users for such media providers or at least some liability for the effects of their services on other parties.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2011, 09:52:43 am by Brad Weber »
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