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Author Topic: Distro Panel  (Read 5763 times)

Greg_Cameron

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2014, 02:12:21 pm »

I could have sworn Hubbell had rated their wire clamps for their CS connector to 4AWG, but the current spec shows only up to 6AWG.

Looks like Hubbell has conflicting info on these connectors. On page B-71 of their online catalog, it shows up to 4AWG wire size: http://ecatalog.hubbell-wiring.com/productinformation/viewcatalog.aspx?Dest=hubbell-wiring.com/press/catalog/B.pdf&Page=55

Another search on their side turned up a page that said 6AWG max. Go figure...

http://www.hubbellcatalog.com/wiring/section-b-datasheet.asp?FAM=Locking_Devices&PN=CS6365C
« Last Edit: August 15, 2014, 02:20:23 pm by Greg Cameron »
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George Dougherty

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2014, 05:35:13 pm »

Looks like Hubbell has conflicting info on these connectors. On page B-71 of their online catalog, it shows up to 4AWG wire size: http://ecatalog.hubbell-wiring.com/productinformation/viewcatalog.aspx?Dest=hubbell-wiring.com/press/catalog/B.pdf&Page=55

Another search on their side turned up a page that said 6AWG max. Go figure...

http://www.hubbellcatalog.com/wiring/section-b-datasheet.asp?FAM=Locking_Devices&PN=CS6365C

Model numbers are different on the two links there and the images don't look like the same by any stretch.
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Greg_Cameron

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2014, 05:47:47 pm »

Model numbers are different on the two links there and the images don't look like the same by any stretch.

You might want to look again. I referred to the top link which describes the specs to the CS connectors which include the connector bodies and plugs on page B-57 of that catalog. On that page is the CS6365C Plug which the specs state can accept 4AWG wire for the bare wire clamps. Then the second link, also from the Hubbell, site is a direct link to the product data sheet for the CS6365C plug which states 6AWG maximum wire size for the bare wire clamps.
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Mike Sokol

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2014, 06:36:52 pm »

Technically as you've stated, 6AWG 4 wire cable isn't NEC compliant for a true 50A, you'd need 4AWG. I could have sworn Hubbell had rated their wire clamps for their CS connector to 4AWG, but the current spec shows only up to 6AWG. However, the Leviton version does specify wire sizes up to 4AWG: http://www.grainger.com/ec/pdf/50Amp-Wiring-Devices-Brochure.pdf . That's probably the way to go to get both NEC compliance and minimum voltage drop for a full 50A distro.

Perhaps we should ask Hubbell directly about this? Could this be a Mini-LED Talk of maybe a day or so and just a few questions on this one topic?

Thoughts???  ;D
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Mark Cadwallader

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2014, 07:00:28 pm »

Perhaps we should ask Hubbell directly about this? Could this be a Mini-LED Talk of maybe a day or so and just a few questions on this one topic?

Thoughts???  ;D

I don't know if we need a discussion session with Hubbell, just clarification as to whether 4AWG stranded will fit into the 50A devices (male plugs and female connectors).  If Hubbell says 4AWG fits, somebody could see if it really does, with the actual production tolerences.  Design specs are one thing, reality is sometimes different.  My mileage often varies.  Mark C.
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Greg_Cameron

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2014, 08:43:56 pm »

I don't know if we need a discussion session with Hubbell, just clarification as to whether 4AWG stranded will fit into the 50A devices (male plugs and female connectors).  If Hubbell says 4AWG fits, somebody could see if it really does, with the actual production tolerences.  Design specs are one thing, reality is sometimes different.

I've put together a bunch of those connectors, both the single and 3 versions using 6AWG. They're PITA and the wire needs to be fresh cut & gently put into the clamps almost simultaneously for all poles or you risk bending strands making it even more difficult. It's been a while since I've done it, but I think it is possible to squeeze 4AWG in there. However, I'm guessing it's pretty frustrating and tedious based on the trickiness of the 6AWG.
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Rob Spence

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2014, 11:09:52 pm »

George, that is a 50A 2-pole breaker, not a 100A breaker. Calling it 100A will confuse anyone you talk to about your system.

The main breaker is sized to the supply tails, so for 50A you need #4 wire (#6 is commonly used but is technically illegal). You can have significantly more than 50A worth of breakers per leg and not have code problems, but at some point you will have operational problems depending on how much power you are pulling at any given time.

If it were me, I would not add any more breakers than your current 3x20A per leg. Get a current meter and figure out what your loads actually are. You may be able to combine some existing loads together, freeing up a circuit or two.

Actually, for a sub panel (most distros are technically sub panels) you don't NEED a main breaker. The breaker at the other end of the feeder must be sized to protect the feeder wire. I like having a main breaker in my distro as I like having a local main switch.



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George Dougherty

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #17 on: August 16, 2014, 12:31:17 pm »

Actually, for a sub panel (most distros are technically sub panels) you don't NEED a main breaker. The breaker at the other end of the feeder must be sized to protect the feeder wire. I like having a main breaker in my distro as I like having a local main switch.



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That would be why I put mine in.  Made sense to have a main shutoff locally. 

Not sure if I need to but my practice the few times I've used it is to shut off all the breakers after use.  Then, on next connection, turn on the main breaker, followed by the individual circuits and meter the outlets as I turn them on. 

Right now it's on a plywood sandwich board I built, and the panel is assembled out of weatherproof outdoor rated components.  I know the general preference would be to have it be premade by a licensed shop as Mike mentioned, but I planned and built it with the assistance of two electricians and both have visually and physically inspected my construction noting that it was cleaner tighter work than they usually see elsewhere.  I'm meticulous and I didn't take this lightly.

I plan on building it into a rolling rack case in the near future with the panel on one half and a quad box for each circuit on the other.  The other thought I had was to drop what I have into the bottom of a long rolling trunk and store the feeder cable on the top of it, giving me a double duty case.  The panel would stay in the bottom of the trunk when in use.  I'm less enamored with having to pull all the feeder cable out if I need just a short length, but it's more cost effective than buying two cases, which appeals to me.  Any suggestions for or against either option?
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Stephen Swaffer

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #18 on: August 16, 2014, 02:53:21 pm »

One comment on wire sizes accepted by devices-overall diameter is affected by the stranding and can vary from some-code also recognizes "compact conductors, though that is more for building wire than flexible cables.  In a previous job I used to use a lot of compression lugs on 4/0 weld cable.  One type of lug would work IF the cable was freshly cut and very carefully and gently handled until it was in the lug.  IIRC the finer the stranding the greater the actual diameter of the wire. 
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Steve Swaffer

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Re: Distro Panel
« Reply #18 on: August 16, 2014, 02:53:21 pm »


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