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Sound Reinforcement - Forums for Live Sound Professionals - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Live Sound Forums => AC Power and Grounding => Topic started by: Mike Sokol on January 29, 2019, 08:27:40 pm

Title: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Mike Sokol on January 29, 2019, 08:27:40 pm
Just a reminder, especially when working with 12-volt, high-amperage circuits. You don't want to get your wedding ring between anything energized and anything grounded.
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Jeff Bankston on January 30, 2019, 04:25:47 am
I did not allow anyone to wear any kind of jewelry on my job. Long hair had to be in a pony tail and if real long a bun. T shirts only. Most of the time the company provided the shirts.

30 years ago on someone elses job a guys wedding ring touched something hot in a panel. It burned a ring around his finger to the bone. The guy that took him to the hospital told us the doc had to amputate his finger. Thats when I stopped wearing a watch and decided if I ever ran jobs nobody was gonna be wearing stuff. No metal belt buckles either. 
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Nathan Riddle on January 30, 2019, 10:53:40 am
https://www.saferingz.com/

& plenty more @ Amazon/other

I keep thinking I need to get myself a set. Not that I do things that warrant a silicone ring often, but there are times where I think about it...
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: John Roberts {JR} on January 30, 2019, 11:02:59 am
I think I mentioned this before but when I was installing my new dishwasher several years ago, I read about a man electrocuted when his ring made contact with hot exposed mains wiring.

JR 
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Taylor Hall on January 30, 2019, 11:31:06 am
I always take jewelry off when doing anything mechanical or electrical. Cheap and easy insurance to be sure my fingers stay intact a bit longer.
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Dave Garoutte on January 30, 2019, 12:27:28 pm
My Titanium wedding ring actually saved my finger once when the mill I was tightening the draw bar on turned on and pinned my finger (at the ring) to the motor with the wrench.  It would have broken my finger for sure.
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Chris Hindle on January 30, 2019, 12:59:47 pm
 Back in the 80's when i took my Mechanics exam, 6 or 8 of us were sitting in a waiting area, to be called to one of the 8 exam stations.
As I went to each station, I pulled off my watch and stuffed it into a pocket.
As I approached the Transmission station, the instructor sees me, and asks why I took off my watch. "I can't work with crap on my wrist".
He rolls up his shirtsleeve, and shows me a wicked scar. "I wish I thought like that when I was 25. Got my hand pinned under a dashboard, and the guys had to cut me out".
OK then, it's official. No "jewelry" when working with your hands.....
Today I wear a medic-alert bracelet, but then I am not wrenching cars and trucks anymore.
Chris.
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Tim McCulloch on January 30, 2019, 02:56:52 pm
The TD at a client venue is now wearing a ceramic wedding ring after his prior ring experienced some DC contact.

This below is why we (stage technicians, production company workers) DO NOT, under any circumstances, disconnect CamLocs while powered or under load.  This is why we DO NOT work in energized panels or with stuff that might be energized without our knowledge (lockout/tag out).

I'm pretty sure this guy's career as a stage hand ended with the big blue spark.
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Dave Garoutte on January 30, 2019, 07:29:15 pm
That's gruesome! :-\
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: John Roberts {JR} on January 30, 2019, 07:37:49 pm
There was a gruesome picture shared recently on FB of a high voltage flashover caused by a meter that had been stored outdoors in a truck and moisture from condensation inside provided the unexpected conductive path.

The incident was several years ago in Dakota,,, hard to share FB links.

JR
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Tim McCulloch on January 30, 2019, 08:02:13 pm
That's gruesome! :-\

"Don't be like this guy, kids!"

I have this pic in my phone gallery.  I show it to folks who think it's okay to hot patch CamLocs.
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Dave Garoutte on January 31, 2019, 12:31:40 pm
It's like back in the day, when they showed car crash pix during driver education to show the consequences of speeding or drinking. :-\
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Mike Sokol on February 01, 2019, 01:01:51 pm
The TD at a client venue is now wearing a ceramic wedding ring after his prior ring experienced some DC contact.

This below is why we (stage technicians, production company workers) DO NOT, under any circumstances, disconnect CamLocs while powered or under load.  This is why we DO NOT work in energized panels or with stuff that might be energized without our knowledge (lockout/tag out).

I'm pretty sure this guy's career as a stage hand ended with the big blue spark.

An arc-flash accident is WAY more dangerous than a simple shock, even a relatively high voltage shock. If the shock incident is over quickly enough (within a few seconds) and you don't fall off of a roof, ladder or scaffolding due to the shock, then worse case they can probably restart your heart with an AED (hopefully) and you'll walk away with a story that will earn you a few drinks telling bar stories.

Arc Flash damage (as you can see) goes bone deep, generally blowing off any skin and meat in the area of the blast. Then it's reconstructive surgery, lots of rehab, and probable loss of something (like a hand or face) you really need and want. Arc Flash explosions terrify me a bit since I was in one up close and personal (luckily no damage) and saw/heard one happen a few hundred feet away (which certainly would have severely injured or killed anyone in the vicinity. What we do for a living can be very dangerous, so we always have to treat electricity with the utmost respect. 
Title: Re: Why electricity and jewelry don't mix
Post by: Taylor Hall on February 01, 2019, 01:35:50 pm
An arc-flash accident is WAY more dangerous than a simple shock, even a relatively high voltage shock. If the shock incident is over quickly enough (within a few seconds) and you don't fall off of a roof, ladder or scaffolding due to the shock, then worse case they can probably restart your heart with an AED (hopefully) and you'll walk away with a story that will earn you a few drinks telling bar stories.

Arc Flash damage (as you can see) goes bone deep, generally blowing off any skin and meat in the area of the blast. Then it's reconstructive surgery, lots of rehab, and probable loss of something (like a hand or face) you really need and want. Arc Flash explosions terrify me a bit since I was in one up close and personal (luckily no damage) and saw/heard one happen a few hundred feet away (which certainly would have severely injured or killed anyone in the vicinity. What we do for a living can be very dangerous, so we always have to treat electricity with the utmost respect.
We had a large cabinet flash off at my old job years ago. Distribution facility was getting new conveyors put in, so they had to redo a bunch of the electrical stuff since we were ditching the old pneumatic system. Luckily no one was hurt, but it blew the door clean off and flung it a good 30ft with enough force to put a sizeable dent in a 5" support pipe for a mezzanine structure. Sadly before the time of cellphone cameras, but the aftermath was a sight to behold and most assuredly deadly for whoever was within 15ft of it...