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Title: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Justice C. Bigler on November 05, 2018, 10:32:24 pm
Can you adapt the 50amp California plug to something that is usually available in a regular household service?

The recording truck that I am about to buy includes 50amp service for the studio area with 2 isolated 20 amp circuits for audio and a 20 amp circuit for HVAC and lighting.

I'm going to get new service and a new meter installed at my house from the electric coop, and an electrician friend will wire in a disconnect and 50amp plug for me. But I'm looking for a way to power it when I take it somewhere else to record that isn't a production venue.

Is there any easy way to make it happen?

It comes with cabling with both the California plug and Camlocks.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Corey Scogin on November 05, 2018, 11:14:26 pm
I suspect the most common receptacle for 50A service is the NEMA 14-50. It's the one used for electric ovens and dryers in residential applications as well as some electric car chargers.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Justice C. Bigler on November 05, 2018, 11:57:29 pm
I suspect the most common receptacle for 50A service is the NEMA 14-50. It's the one used for electric ovens and dryers in residential applications as well as some electric car chargers.
Is that a 3 phase service? I thought those dryer plugs were single phase.


What's the dryer plug with the angled terminals?
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: David Sturzenbecher on November 06, 2018, 12:17:08 am
Is that a 3 phase service? I thought those dryer plugs were single phase.


What's the dryer plug with the angled terminals?
50A California’s come in both single and three phase. Which does your truck have?


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Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Justice C. Bigler on November 06, 2018, 12:39:55 am
I thought it was 3 phase. It's got the connector with the spike in the middle and the two (of three) blades with the prongs that face outwards. Trying to upload a picture, but it looks like the forum hard drive is full...or something.


Here is the input side of the plug on the truck:


(http://www.justicebigler.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/IMG_20181105_151354421-1024x768.jpg)
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Tim Hite on November 06, 2018, 02:26:52 am
https://hubbellcdn.com/ohwassets/HCI/WiringDevice/Catalog/NEMA/NEMA_2017%20Twist-Lock%20Devices.pdf

http://ecatalog.hubbell-wiring.com/press/catalog/B-57.pdf

Looks like the 3Ř prongs bend inward and the 125/250 prongs bend outward. Looks like you've got the 125/250 version, not 3Ř

http://ecatalog.hubbell-wiring.com/productinformation/specsheets/3A/Live/PDF/CS6365C_cart.pdf

Checking the wiring on the inside to make sure it's actually hooked up the way it's supposed to be is another matter. . .

How many Camlocks are there? 4 for 125/250 and 5 for 3Ř would be a good indicator of what's expected. . .

I thought it was 3 phase. It's got the connector with the spike in the middle and the two (of three) blades with the prongs that face outwards. Trying to upload a picture, but it looks like the forum hard drive is full...or something.


Here is the input side of the plug on the truck:


(http://www.justicebigler.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/IMG_20181105_151354421-1024x768.jpg)
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Mike Pyle on November 06, 2018, 09:17:28 am
The "California" 50a is single phase. 2 lines, one neutral, and the ground on the outer shell. The center post is just a guide, not a conductor.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: TJ (Tom) Cornish on November 06, 2018, 09:50:15 am
Is that a 3 phase service? I thought those dryer plugs were single phase.


What's the dryer plug with the angled terminals?
It will probably be pretty difficult for you to get 3-phase power at your house - that requires it being available at your street, new wiring from street to your home, a new meter, and a new breaker panel.  If it's possible at all, it's probably $10,000 worth of work.

That said, as others have pointed out, what most in our industry call a "California" plug is just a nicer version of the NEMA 14-50, which is a single-phase device containing two hots, a neutral, and a ground.

Answering your first question directly - no, it's not particularly easy to feed this with standard house power.  You can make an adapter cable with a 5-15P (standard Edison plug) to a California female where you wire the hot wire from the 5-15P to both hots of the California (would require an enclosure for the Cali female so you can do this in a legal way with wirenuts), but this limits your whole operation to one 20A circuit powering both sides of your distro.  This may be adequate depending on the load you are drawing.  If you're trying to power your air conditioner it's not going to work.  For audio gear, it might be fine as long as your truck didn't come with an ATI Paragon console and isn't filled with tube gear.

A Honda EU7000 generator may be your best bet for remote situations.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Brian Jojade on November 06, 2018, 11:16:27 am
Once you get beyond 20 amp edison plugs, the number of options starts to increase pretty quickly.  Being prepared for everything means a collection of adaptors.

Of you do adapt to a dryer plug, make sure that it is actually wired correctly.  In older installs, dryer plugs were 240 volts only, and did not have a neutral line. The ground line was often under sized as well.  These would typically be 3 blade plugs, which was 2 hots and a ground. Sometimes people swap out that plug with a 4 pin unit and cheat the ground and neutral conductors together.  For a simple dryer that would work, but if you try to pull 110v using the undersized neutral from one leg, you have the potential of overloading the wiring.  Making sure your phases are balanced reduces this risk, but using it in the first place isn't good practice.

Remember that if you lose a neutral line, very bad things can start to happen with your gear.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Riley Casey on November 06, 2018, 11:19:56 am
Justice,  I made a point of setting up both of my trucks back in the day for single phase operation and it paid off repeatedly for instances when we had a client who wanted to record in the comfort of his living room.  The air con draws the most current and even so if you design the truck to shed the electronics heat directly  and only rely on the air con to cool the people that draw can be minimized.  I had no trouble finding trailer sized air con units that worked on single phase since they had to serve a residential building market.  These days with much more efficient electronics the heat generated is even less.  I had to keep two analog 24 tracks , 48 of of dolby and a 40 channel analog console cool in the big truck along with a few racks of analog outboard. 

I also split the power as soon as it arrived at the truck with direct connections to the air handler and thru a transformer with taps for boosting voltage if needed.  I think we changed taps twice in more than ten years of operation so a one to one with a center tapped secondary for audio power would be fine.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Mark Cadwallader on November 06, 2018, 01:50:42 pm
Besides an adapter to a NEMA 14-50P (range plug), I suggest another adapter for a NEMA 14-30P (dryer plug). It is often easier to access the dryer's electrical connection than moving the range in somebody's home.  Same comments as above re: 3 wire vs 4 wire connectors.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jonathan Johnson on November 06, 2018, 03:59:58 pm
Besides an adapter to a NEMA 14-50P (range plug), I suggest another adapter for a NEMA 14-30P (dryer plug). It is often easier to access the dryer's electrical connection than moving the range in somebody's home.  Same comments as above re: 3 wire vs 4 wire connectors.

There are two different "range plugs" and two different "dryer plugs" in common use.

More common in newer installations is the NEMA 14-50 (125/250V 50A single phase "range plug") and NEMA 14-30 (125/250V 30A single phase "dryer plug") with two hots, neutral, and ground (four pins).

Common in older installations is the NEMA 10-50 (125/250V 50A single phase "range plug") and NEMA 10-30 (125/250V 30A single phase "dryer plug") with two hots and a neutral (three pins).

A note about the NEMA 10- series: when used in dryers and ranges, the chassis of the appliance is generally bonded to the neutral terminal, creating a "bootleg ground." This practice was deprecated with the 1999 National Electrical Code, which required the equipment ground conductor be separate from the neutral conductor, effectively prohibiting new installations using the NEMA 10-series. The cordsets connecting appliances to NEMA 14- series receptacles are usually black in color with a round cord profile. The cordsets connecting appliances to NEMA 10- series receptacles are usually grey in color with a flat cord profile. In many NEMA 10- installations, the neutral wire is undersized due to the idea at the time that the neutral load would be far less than the hot load.

I recommend NEVER tapping into a NEMA 10- series receptacle for audio or lighting loads, since it may not be safe (or good for the audio) to rely on a bootleg ground, and the neutral may be undersized.

HINT: some homes built or remodeled in the 1990s or later may have NEMA 10- series receptacles, but the in-wall wiring will actually have separate neutral and ground conductors (the ground conductor is not connected to the receptacle). If in conduit, the conduit may serve as the ground IF the "neutral" wire is continuous and insulated AND the conduit is continuous all the way back to the service panel. If this is the case, qualified personnel could replace the receptacle and the cordset to the appliance with NEMA 14- series devices. When converting an appliance from a NEMA 10- series cordset to NEMA 14- series, be sure to remove the jumper between the chassis and the neutral terminal.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Mike Sokol on November 06, 2018, 07:33:32 pm
I suspect the most common receptacle for 50A service is the NEMA 14-50. It's the one used for electric ovens and dryers in residential applications as well as some electric car chargers.

This is also what's used for every RV that uses a 50-amp, 120/240-volt shore power connection. 
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Kevin Conlon on November 06, 2018, 08:08:15 pm
Can you adapt the 50amp California plug to something that is usually available in a regular household service?

The recording truck that I am about to buy includes 50amp service for the studio area with 2 isolated 20 amp circuits for audio and a 20 amp circuit for HVAC and lighting.

I'm going to get new service and a new meter installed at my house from the electric coop, and an electrician friend will wire in a disconnect and 50amp plug for me. But I'm looking for a way to power it when I take it somewhere else to record that isn't a production venue.

Is there any easy way to make it happen?

It comes with cabling with both the California plug and Camlocks.
Provided you have split phase and not three, get all 14-50 ends. Find them in most any ones house. The ends will come with stove and dryer pins, so easy to swap. Most peoples wives are going to have a problem moving the stove. Maybe consider the welder in the garage for ac? You can not carry everything so a genny for air could be in the cards? Everyone else is right about older 240. 3# wires= no, 4 wires old= look first, 4 wires newish= plug and play. Enjoy your rig!  By the way, is the ac 120 or 240?
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Justice C. Bigler on November 06, 2018, 10:34:54 pm
Thanks everyone. It sounds like an adapter to the Nema 14-50 or should do the trick most of the time. I should be making the final deal for the truck tomorrow. Already have the insurance for it, just need pay and get the keys. I will know alot more after tomorrow.

I'll have my electrician buddy look over the wiring to make sure it's all in good shape and make up a few adapters for me. But this was a working truck for a number of years and has been owned by a friend's production company who is very safe about their electrical connections.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jonathan Johnson on November 06, 2018, 11:58:01 pm
(NEMA 14-50) is also what's used for every RV that uses a 50-amp, 120/240-volt shore power connection.

Not all campgrounds have converted to NEMA 14-50, but almost all will supply a TT-30 receptacle, which provides 120V 30A: one hot, one neutral, one ground (in addition to NEMA 5-15 120V 15A).
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Justice C. Bigler on December 06, 2018, 12:34:32 am
Coming back to this....

It turns out that I have an exterior accessible  NEMA 14-50 outlet at our place that I didn't know about.

Is a NEMA 14-50 to California plug adapter the kind of thing I can pick up at a local electrical supply house? or will I need to order one online?
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Tim Hite on December 06, 2018, 02:13:36 am
You local electrical wholesale place should sell Hubbell devices or you can order the connectors from OA Windsor. Get the cable locally and avoid shipping. I just went through it with 12/3 SOOW for extension corsets and it was 30% cheaper to drive somewhere. The Orange Store sucks for SOOW cable. You will need 6/4 to be 50A compliant.

You can get Leviton connectors on Amazon for el cheap, but Hubble Wiring Devices is where it's at.



Coming back to this....

It turns out that I have an exterior accessible  NEMA 14-50 outlet at our place that I didn't know about.

Is a NEMA 14-50 to California plug adapter the kind of thing I can pick up at a local electrical supply house? or will I need to order one online?
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Justice C. Bigler on December 06, 2018, 03:19:24 am
You local electrical wholesale place should sell Hubbell devices or you can order the connectors from OA Windsor. Get the cable locally and avoid shipping. I just went through it with 12/3 SOOW for extension corsets and it was 30% cheaper to drive somewhere. The Orange Store sucks for SOOW cable. You will need 6/4 to be 50A compliant.

You can get Leviton connectors on Amazon for el cheap, but Hubble Wiring Devices is where it's at.
I've got 300' of the 6/4 50 amp cable with the california plugs, there's 3 different 100' runs. I just need a 1 foot adapter cable.


...or maybe I should just buy one of the NEMA 14-50 connectors and put it on one end of my California cable.... Then again, I'd hate to lose a whole length of it just for one adapter...
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Tim Hite on December 06, 2018, 12:59:34 pm
You're probably going to want the adapter to be long enough to rest the CS50 connectors on the ground. I certainly wouldn't want them tugging on my outlet all day long.

I've got 300' of the 6/4 50 amp cable with the california plugs, there's 3 different 100' runs. I just need a 1 foot adapter cable.


...or maybe I should just buy one of the NEMA 14-50 connectors and put it on one end of my California cable.... Then again, I'd hate to lose a whole length of it just for one adapter...
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Tracy Garner on December 06, 2018, 01:41:38 pm
Can you adapt the 50amp California plug to something that is usually available in a regular household service?

The recording truck that I am about to buy includes 50amp service for the studio area with 2 isolated 20 amp circuits for audio and a 20 amp circuit for HVAC and lighting.

I'm going to get new service and a new meter installed at my house from the electric coop, and an electrician friend will wire in a disconnect and 50amp plug for me. But I'm looking for a way to power it when I take it somewhere else to record that isn't a production venue.

Is there any easy way to make it happen?

It comes with cabling with both the California plug and Camlocks.

Go to your local RV dealer and they will have what you are looking for. One company even has a kit combination of 50, 30, 20AMP plugs to convert from the CA 50.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jay Barracato on December 06, 2018, 03:17:58 pm
I've got 300' of the 6/4 50 amp cable with the california plugs, there's 3 different 100' runs. I just need a 1 foot adapter cable.


...or maybe I should just buy one of the NEMA 14-50 connectors and put it on one end of my California cable.... Then again, I'd hate to lose a whole length of it just for one adapter...
The cable end female is marinco 6364crn. I would get one of those and put it on the end of a standard 50 amp molded nema plug + cable.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jonathan Johnson on December 06, 2018, 03:58:55 pm
The cable end female is marinco 6364crn. I would get one of those and put it on the end of a standard 50 amp molded nema plug + cable.

Keep in mind that the molded cordsets sold for use on kitchen ranges typically aren't designed with flexibility or heavy use in mind. The manufacturers expect them to be plugged in once then left alone for the next 30 years behind the range.

Using SOOW and a Hubbell plug would likely yield better long-term results for your application.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jay Barracato on December 06, 2018, 04:13:36 pm
Keep in mind that the molded cordsets sold for use on kitchen ranges typically aren't designed with flexibility or heavy use in mind. The manufacturers expect them to be plugged in once then left alone for the next 30 years behind the range.

Using SOOW and a Hubbell plug would likely yield better long-term results for your application.
For 5ft to an adapter, I don't see that as a problem. The major run is still SOOW, including any that is on the ground. The molded range plug is easily available locally, and reasonably cheap. Any damage and it is replaced.

If I really thought is was a problem, I would remove the extra connection from the system and put the nema plug on one end of the longer runs.

Most venues I seem to just drop straight from the plug to the spider box. Even with a Honda generator, I have generally been close enough that the extra distance wasn't needed. (A eu7500 directly behind a sl150 cannot be heard at all). Any larger generator and I am thinking tails to cams.

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Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jay Barracato on December 06, 2018, 04:53:30 pm
For 5ft to an adapter, I don't see that as a problem. The major run is still SOOW, including any that is on the ground. The molded range plug is easily available locally, and reasonably cheap. Any damage and it is replaced.

If I really thought is was a problem, I would remove the extra connection from the system and put the nema plug on one end of the longer runs.

Most venues I seem to just drop straight from the plug to the spider box. Even with a Honda generator, I have generally been close enough that the extra distance wasn't needed. (A eu7500 directly behind a sl150 cannot be heard at all). Any larger generator and I am thinking tails to cams.

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I believe to be totally nec compliant, you should add the 7715 and 7717 waterproof covers if the connection is on the ground (or exposed wet location).

What I can't remember or find online ( I am not where my paper copy of the nec is) is that there is a limit to the number of connectors a feeder can have. I think I remember it being 2 but I am not sure. Using one of them for a short adapter would limit your overall length.

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Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Tim McCulloch on December 06, 2018, 05:01:54 pm
Jay, I think Jonathan is hinting that the molded 14-50 cordset isn't Listed for the use you propose.

I'd be inclined to build my own.

I believe to be totally nec compliant, you should add the 7715 and 7717 waterproof covers if the connection is on the ground (or exposed wet location).

What I can't remember or find online ( I am not where my paper copy of the nec is) is that there is a limit to the number of connectors a feeder can have. I think I remember it being 2 but I am not sure. Using one of them for a short adapter would limit your overall length.

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You're allowed 2 "interconnections" IIRC.  In a "tails and Cams" situation the lug-to-female CamLok is usually treated as 1 interconnection (at the Cams), so a 100' run that terminates at your distro would have 1 interconnection; add a 50' because you're on a half-house show and that's 2.  Obviously it's up to the local AHJ regarding treating the adapter as a "tail" or an interconnect but my guess is they'd not have an issue with it.  If this is being used at a private facility or residence I doubt there would be any inspection since it's plug and play.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jay Barracato on December 06, 2018, 05:17:23 pm
Jay, I think Jonathan is hinting that the molded 14-50 cordset isn't Listed for the use you propose.

I'd be inclined to build my own.

You're allowed 2 "interconnections" IIRC.  In a "tails and Cams" situation the lug-to-female CamLok is usually treated as 1 interconnection (at the Cams), so a 100' run that terminates at your distro would have 1 interconnection; add a 50' because you're on a half-house show and that's 2.  Obviously it's up to the local AHJ regarding treating the adapter as a "tail" or an interconnect but my guess is they'd not have an issue with it.  If this is being used at a private facility or residence I doubt there would be any inspection since it's plug and play.
I think you could argue that the 14-50 receptacle is not listed for that service either.

I think we are in that same ill defined region as using sj in non traffic areas. At some point it becomes easier to make everything SOOW so there is no doubt.

As I said, I would be more inclined for a longer run to swap a California for the nema on a long cable as I switch back and forth between generator and provided range plug (shore power).

But for a short run, I trust the typical range plug that is easy to inspect and replace more than I trust many of the Marine/rv kludge cables I see for sale.

A five foot length of sj that is not over current has to be safer than a 100 ft coil of so in a pile. At least that's what I go with until an ahj tells me different. (How many shows limited to a 50 amp range plug ever see an ahj? )

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Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Justice C. Bigler on December 06, 2018, 06:55:04 pm
I bought a NEMA 14-50 plug to put on the end of one of my runs. I should be good to go. Just have to meter the power before I connect it.


All of my cable is 6/4 SOOW.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jeremy Young on December 06, 2018, 07:33:45 pm
Not to derail this thread, but since Justice seems to have the answer he was seeking, can I ask a clarifying question? 

Firstly I've never needed more than my NEMA14-50 distro and I've never seen an AHJ at one of my gigs.

I have an adapter that's 1' long with a 50A cali connector on one end and a 14-50R on the other for one particular venue I find myself in frequently that just has a cali connector in the ballroom.  My main feeder is a 50' long 6/4 SOOW Carol cable with NEMA14-50R/14-50P at the ends.  Sometimes I need longer than 50' and borrow from another local guy when needed, but I had been considering picking up another 50' length with the same connections so I could simply connect the two when needed.  I don't love the idea of a connection somewhere halfway between the stage and the shore-power, but perhaps the 50a twistlock connectors would at least be low-profile enough that they would be less of a tripping hazard to deal with than a right-angle 14-50 plug and receptacle.

The comments above regarding two interconnections maximum makes me thing that I'd be treading in deep water if I went ahead with that plan.  Even without using the short cali adapter cable, I'd have two 50' 6/4 cables in series then my Peavey Distro plugged into the second one, giving me three connection points (receptacle, feeder coupler, peavey plug).  Feeder and coupler may not be the right terminology here but hopefully you guys are picking up what I'm putting down.

I suppose the better answer is a dedicated 100' cable for when I need something longer?  Has anything I've said thus far made anyone cringe?  Always looking for the safest most compliant way to get things done, but I also appreciate utilizing existing inventory as much as possible.  Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Tim Hite on December 06, 2018, 07:55:08 pm
I didn't even realize there was such a thing as a 14-50 distro. I would be nervous about using non-locking connectors on any portable feeder cable, whether or not it was code compliant.

If it were me, I would have CS50 distro and feeder and an adapter from 14-50 to CS50. There are a several advantages to this

1) Difficult to have your feeder become unplugged due to locking connectors

2) Ability to pull power off a generator with CS50

3) Less trip and break hazard than with 14-50 right angle plugs

4) You can rent more feeder if you need to because this is what everyone carries

5) You can pull power from spider boxes if necessary

As for length, you can get 300' on CS50s using your two connections and 100' pieces of cable. You'll end up with about 12% voltage drop using 6/4.

I don't believe the starting and ending receptacles count as connection points.

Not to derail this thread, but since Justice seems to have the answer he was seeking, can I ask a clarifying question? 

Firstly I've never needed more than my NEMA14-50 distro and I've never seen an AHJ at one of my gigs.

I have an adapter that's 1' long with a 50A cali connector on one end and a 14-50R on the other for one particular venue I find myself in frequently that just has a cali connector in the ballroom.  My main feeder is a 50' long 6/4 SOOW Carol cable with NEMA14-50R/14-50P at the ends.  Sometimes I need longer than 50' and borrow from another local guy when needed, but I had been considering picking up another 50' length with the same connections so I could simply connect the two when needed.  I don't love the idea of a connection somewhere halfway between the stage and the shore-power, but perhaps the 50a twistlock connectors would at least be low-profile enough that they would be less of a tripping hazard to deal with than a right-angle 14-50 plug and receptacle.

The comments above regarding two interconnections maximum makes me thing that I'd be treading in deep water if I went ahead with that plan.  Even without using the short cali adapter cable, I'd have two 50' 6/4 cables in series then my Peavey Distro plugged into the second one, giving me three connection points (receptacle, feeder coupler, peavey plug).  Feeder and coupler may not be the right terminology here but hopefully you guys are picking up what I'm putting down.

I suppose the better answer is a dedicated 100' cable for when I need something longer?  Has anything I've said thus far made anyone cringe?  Always looking for the safest most compliant way to get things done, but I also appreciate utilizing existing inventory as much as possible.  Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jeremy Young on December 07, 2018, 01:00:40 pm
Thanks Tim that's good advice.  Peavey made a 2RU rackmounted distro for while, ETL listed and such, with a 9' NEMA14-50P on the end and 6 20A breakered 115v circuits. 

I run into NEMA14-50R a lot in venues in my area, perhaps it's a Canadian thing.  I don't do much with generators at this time, but my company is still in its early stages so I haven't seen it all yet.

I certainly like the idea of locking connectors whenever possible, so the idea of changing the ends on my 6/4 extension to CS50s is appealing.  Unless I drop some money on a new distro, I'd still be using the short adapter cable on that end, but for venues with 14-50 receptacles I'd need adapters at both ends of that cable which is what concerns me with this talk of a maximum of two interconnects. 

If that is defined as a plug into a receptacle, that hypothetical run I just described would have an interconnect at the first adapter, one at the distro end, and then the distro tail itself plugging into the adapter.... let alone if I were to add more lengths of 6/4 with connections in between... 


I guess that's really what I was hoping for clarification on.  What is defined as an interconnect? 
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Tim Hite on December 07, 2018, 03:25:33 pm
Without seeing your distro, I would assume it is easy enough to open it up and swap out the NEMA14-50 for a CS50 inlet. I want to say they have the same form factor and will go in the same hole. Probably best to have an electrician do it for you.

I have CS50s all over my little valley, but then again, I live in California. . .maybe that's just our style.

Thanks Tim that's good advice.  Peavey made a 2RU rackmounted distro for while, ETL listed and such, with a 9' NEMA14-50P on the end and 6 20A breakered 115v circuits. 

I run into NEMA14-50R a lot in venues in my area, perhaps it's a Canadian thing.  I don't do much with generators at this time, but my company is still in its early stages so I haven't seen it all yet.

I certainly like the idea of locking connectors whenever possible, so the idea of changing the ends on my 6/4 extension to CS50s is appealing.  Unless I drop some money on a new distro, I'd still be using the short adapter cable on that end, but for venues with 14-50 receptacles I'd need adapters at both ends of that cable which is what concerns me with this talk of a maximum of two interconnects. 

If that is defined as a plug into a receptacle, that hypothetical run I just described would have an interconnect at the first adapter, one at the distro end, and then the distro tail itself plugging into the adapter.... let alone if I were to add more lengths of 6/4 with connections in between... 


I guess that's really what I was hoping for clarification on.  What is defined as an interconnect?
Title: Re: Adapting 50A California plug to something household
Post by: Jeremy Young on December 07, 2018, 03:47:46 pm
Well they do call it a California connector...  The back of the Peavey rackmount distro has a cable coming out of the back panel with a strain relief, the NEMA14-50P is at the end of that cable.  I think removing the cable and adding a CS50 inlet would involve more modification than I would be comfortable with, but I see where you're going with that, in that it would cut down at least one connection point.  I see every plug/receptacle connection point as one more place where oxidation can occur and give me issues.  The 9' cord on the back of the distro is rarely long enough to connect to the source of power anyway, versus where I want my amp/stagebox rack to be located. 

Perhaps a dedicated motion labs or similar unit would be a better way to go for when I have CS50 connectors, or my Peavey if it's 14-50 and within 50' so I could use the single feeder I already own.

If anyone following along has a copy of the code book and can settle the interconnect terminology for me that would be appreciated, but in the meantime I thank you Tim for your ideas.