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 21 
 on: Today at 08:41:12 am 
Started by Doug Fowler - Last post by William Schnake
Why use the area use the area stage left/right of the stage for subs when you can block the singer...Come on guys/gals we all know what is more important singer or More Sub in the Middle!!!  It's all about the equipment.  Yes! Yes!! Yes!!!

Enough fun for one day for me.  I've probably done dumber things in life.

Bill

 22 
 on: Today at 08:34:31 am 
Started by Kurt Hutchison - Last post by William Schnake
Planning a new system for our small church.

Deep hall, low ceiling, three rows of 2 speakers on the ceiling, mid bass speaker up front.
We discussed this setup earlier, but now I want to discuss pros and cons of powered speakers vs passive.

What I can think of so far is:

Powered pros:
- speakers self-protect, built-in DSP guarantees no overloads.
- small subtleties like time aligned horn and woofer is something passives can't do.
- no amps, so simplified program wiring.

Powered cons:
- have to run power as well as program, trades off against not having to wire amps.

Curious if there is any accepted lore on this subject.

Kurt, I am going to agree with Mike and Riley.  We just did a full system replacement in a local church eight speakers and a sub.  One of the reasons that we went non-powered was the ability to time align components so that we could reduce the natural reverb of the room and make speaking more intelligible.  By being able to time delay the components in the cabinets individually we were able to increase volume and decrease echo.  IMHO passive with good active crossovers and something like SMAART Di to tune the room is the way to go.

Bill 

 23 
 on: Today at 07:12:51 am 
Started by Kurt Hutchison - Last post by Riley Casey
Passive three way speakers have as little as three and as many as perhaps 20 items that might fail and require service twenty feet in the air. Active speakers around 200.  For a permanent install there is no compelling argumentment for the minimal benefits of powered boxes in your application.

 24 
 on: Today at 06:48:47 am 
Started by TomBoisseau - Last post by TomBoisseau
I have a need for quick access to an aux send master from my digital console.  Currently I am using a rotary “inline” volume control on the output of that aux send and taping it to the side of the console.  I would prefer a real fader, and it dawned on me that I still have a Mackie Remote Master fader from their old “Mixer Mixer” system.   

My question is, what is the pin configuration on the connector and is it possible to use it as a “balanced” inline fader by itself?  It appears to just use a standard 5 pin midi connection, but I don’t know if this line ever actually ever carried audio, or if it was more like a VCA.

If anyone has any info regarding this idea, I’d be grateful.

Thanks,
Tom

 25 
 on: Today at 06:43:15 am 
Started by Kurt Hutchison - Last post by Mike Caldwell


What I can think of so far is:

Powered pros:
- speakers self-protect, built-in DSP guarantees no overloads.
- small subtleties like time aligned horn and woofer is something passives can't do.
- no amps, so simplified program wiring.

Powered cons:
- have to run power as well as program, trades off against not having to wire amps.


Answers to your bullet points

1  - No guarantees
2  - Bi-amped passive cabinets can be time aligned, well desgned
      passive full range speakers are very good.
3  - It's a trade off

For you powered cons:
In addition to running power to speaker locations also think about
turning the speakers on and off. A system master power sequencer is a good thing for a multi user church type system, that will require remote power modules at each speaker or some where in power circuit and those will require another cable to run.

Also if you have an amp issue it's easier to re-patch an amp in a rack and get the system back and running.

 26 
 on: Today at 06:06:29 am 
Started by Timothy Malone - Last post by Chris Grimshaw
FWIW, I carry an iRig to pretty much every gig. It's a convenient line out from the desk for throw-and-go recording on to phones - some acts like to be able to review their performances that way.

It gives you a mono line in. Combine with a lightning to 1/8" jack adapter, and the input will show as the headset input. That ought to work for any app you can think of.

Chris

 27 
 on: Today at 06:02:53 am 
Started by Luke Geis - Last post by Chris Grimshaw
I say getting boned because as most of us know, Alto is not exactly the screaming example of audio perfection and performance.

Not sure I see the issue here.

The guitar amp is part of the musical instrument. If the people using the speakers are happy with the sound (just like all the people using 30w 12" drivers with stamped frames mounted in chipboard cabinets), what's the problem?

Chris

 28 
 on: Today at 05:08:01 am 
Started by Justice C. Bigler - Last post by Keith Broughton
Nothing to see here..as I apparently can't read properly ::)

 29 
 on: Today at 04:44:37 am 
Started by Justice C. Bigler - Last post by Helge A Bentsen

I mean c'mon. 142dB? Does anyone believe that that measurement was taken anywhere in the audience? And if so, was it from just the PA? The pryo? or the 100,000 screaming fans?


142db would have done permanent hearing damage and likely broken people's ear drums 15dB ago.

A few years ago, one of the major national news papers over here ran the headline: «Band plays 142dB at the Quart festival».

Turns out the reporter had a radio shack dBmeter and was standing between the barricades and the PA pointing the dB-meter straight at it....

 30 
 on: Today at 04:42:03 am 
Started by Ike Zimbel - Last post by Ike Zimbel
Thanks for following up - this is going in my pinouts file.

Y'all have a pinouts file, don't you?
Yep, I looked there first. No joy. :-[

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