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 1 
 on: Today at 12:29:49 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Daniel Levi
Surely the best coffee grinder is a Krups Coffina, as that can do more than just grind coffee  ;)
https://img0.etsystatic.com/055/0/8116695/il_fullxfull.724546996_9ztv.jpg

 2 
 on: Today at 12:23:38 pm 
Started by Douglas R. Allen - Last post by Daniel Levi
I some ways I guess it doesn't matter how good it is as being late to the game it has to have the features/price to be a significantly better buy than what people already have, remember most digital mixers are part of an eco system so a lot of the time it is more than just the cost of the console itself that matter, it's all the accessories (remote control computers, stageboxes, cabling Etc.).

Proven reliability is also an important factor, you know how reliable an X32, for example, as it's been around for a while and so you can be pretty confident of there not being any issues with the console when you buy one.

Plus there is also the support network of experienced users for other consoles out there and if speccing for an install that will be used by visitors it's bst to have a console that most visiting users will not only be familiar with but might already have a show file for it.

While there will probably be a lot of users that will buy this because they currently have Peavey products and want to continue with the brand convincing other users to buy in to it will be a lot more difficult.

 3 
 on: Today at 12:11:53 pm 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by Tim McCulloch
I use a slow speed burr grinder (Capresso). The "whirlybird" blade spinners suck because there's no control of relative grind size, and you can have a coarse French press grind with powdery (think too fine for espresso) residue.  Bah, humbug.

I grind before every brewing - can tell if the beans were ground yesterday but I'm not vacuum packing the grind, so there's that.

 4 
 on: Today at 12:11:07 pm 
Started by Ryan Ashley - Last post by Paul G. OBrien
I have an EV Etx 18sp sub on the way, bought it for its lightweight
  Well.. I guess it's all relative, but at 114lbs and 10.6 cu ft it's a good thing this sub comes with wheels as this box is not a one man lift. That said it is a nice performer that should make you happy and the best match for it would be another EV top to get factory matching DSP processing, for your uses the ETX12p or EKX12p would be good choices IMO but the ETX does have a little smoother topend output.

 5 
 on: Today at 11:58:16 am 
Started by Jeff Bankston - Last post by John L Nobile
Having had the pleasure of a business trip to Venezuela and several times to Europe, I have had some great coffee.  Finally got some decent stuff here stateside a few years ago from a fellow engineer at work.  From there I dove into coffee science a bit.  192 degrees, fresh ground, screen filter brewing or French Press does it.  Paper filters suck the oil out of it.  Grounds only stay fresh for about 5 days if kept in an airtight container.  Store the unused beans sealed in a vacuum bag - pull enough beans for 4 days or so of grounds.  Keep the beans staged for grinding in a sealed container.  For work, I grind on Sunday a 4 day supply and vacuum bag it with a Foodsaver.  Once vacuum bagged, the grounds will last 30 days or more before opening and stay fresh.  Vacuum bagged whole beans have an even longer shelf life.

For drip brewing with a screen filter the cone type works best.  For a grinder, get a real one not one of those high speed blender type.  A burr type that spins slow is the ticket.  Kitchenaid makes a good one.  Watch the date on the bag of beans, the closer to 180 days, the fresher it is.  For Starbucks beans once they're within 90 days or so of the use by date I won't buy them as they are becoming stale.  Got 2 lbs today with Apr 21 date on them that will be good.

Good to see a man that respects his coffee. It's always been my choice to get me through a long day. There was never any shortages of those in this racket.

 6 
 on: Today at 11:15:19 am 
Started by Ryan Ashley - Last post by Matthias McCready
If the OP is currently considering Ev Ekx 15p and DAS Vantec 12a, then these are all a little absurdly out of his price bracket.

So, the genre is DJ playing house/techno.  So, you'll want obscenely loud, vast bottom end, and resilience when you try to get the first two.

Think about more subs, as a single sub is unlikely to fulfil you - though, admittedly, you've not given venue size/capacity.

Though I've heard neither then EV nor the DAS units you're looking at, they're in similar price ballparks.  Note that the EV is approx 50% heavier than the DAS.  The EV has the higher on paper output, but you'll never known until you compare them if that's a reliable figure.

Some of those are absolutely out of his price bracket; however sometimes you can find them in good condition on the used market or you can find a deal. I know Martin is definitely in budget for him.

This does come back to SPL though you are right.

Agreed on the subs.

 7 
 on: Today at 11:13:21 am 
Started by Ryan Ashley - Last post by Matthias McCready
I appreciate this honest feedback. I am very much a newbie when it comes to sound and because I am a mobile DJ doing small pop-up classes/parties powered makes more sense at the moment. In the future, I would prefer to have a Passive system and a proper amp and i will try to cross that bridge of knowledge when I get there, but for now, I am mostly curious if it's that big of a deal if I don't match the tops (brand wise) with the sub and how that will play out.

I will say there is nothing wrong with powered, it is my personal preference even for larger systems. I just wanted to state that passive was a viable option, and to hammer home to make sure you never purchase a passive system without the manufacturer specced amp/processor.  :)

Something I forgot to ask, is what type of dB (volume level) are you shooting for? The levels you are trying to achieve should help to guide your choice of speakers. Two caveats here:
1) dB specs for speakers, especially on the cheaper end of the market can be BS (that spec might have been achieved by blowing up the drivers for example)
2) Loud does not equate sound quality, however speakers which are more capable should give you more head room.

I am going to go through some quick and dirty basics here, if you already understand these things great, but they are worth going over. I am sure someone will chime in that explain better and more in depth.

If you are in search of dynamic music, this is where volume matters. You want a loudspeaker system to be linear, ie what you put into it is what you get out of it. At some point every speaker is no longer linear, because you have reached its capacity.

So this means:
1) Good source material (high quality samples, files etc: rather than low quality MP3)
2) Not clipping or adding additional compression (limiters)
3) Have enough "rig for gig"

If you are pushing a system too hard it will start to limit; either because the processing is limiting to protect the drivers or because the driver is working as hard as it capable of.

Clipping (those pesky red lights) should be avoided as:
1) It is not going to make your system louder (a good system is clean)
2) You will be adding distortion, which on the output stage (rather than input) will not sound pleasant and will make the spectral balance harsher.
3) Clipping adds in higher frequencies. Think of this in terms of subs, if you are clipping a sub amp you are now sending lots of high frequency to a large driver, which may destroy the driver.

--

When you are driving a system into limiting things will sound less exciting because it is unable to handle the impact of the loud transients. When this occurs audio engineers and DJ's  often respond by "turning things up," to try to bring back the excitement. This does make it a little louder, but it makes the system limit and compress further (you will miss your transients even more now). You often end up with a very loud mix that is not exciting. Keep in mind your ears play a role in this and if expose them too much volume they will begin to dampen things; again this may lead you to turn your system up. This is a cycle to be aware of; know what your system is capable, and take care of your ears; your audience will appreciate it.

Think of your system like a car, if a car is capable of going 120mph does not mean it is intended to be driven at that speed all day every day.

---

As to subs and tops and mixing and matching there is no exact answer:

In short keeping to the same brand and sometimes speaker series will get you closer to the top and sub working together well, however there are ways you can do this yourself.

There are two main factors for a sub and top working well together (note the second one you can probably ignore):
1. Crossover: This is the frequency where your top box is no longer working and your sub takes over. In addition to making sure the frequencies crossover, the phase of the signal at the crossover point needs line up. If you achieve this it will be a natural transition from top to sub.
2. Time alignment: this is having the arrival time of the top and sub be at the same time; note this matters more for larger venues, and you can only choose one spot for this to be perfect. Additionally this is getting into measurement, which is above your current scope.

---

When it comes to crossovers you have two:
1) Processing: This is the crossover frequency your DSP or powered speaker is set to, for example "65hz."
2)Acoustical: This is where your subwoofer acoustically takes over from your top.

For example if you have your subs +18dB over your tops (which is a valid decision for House music) and your processor has a crossover at 65hz, your system might now have an actual crossover point of 110-120hz.

So before you can make a good crossover decision you need to know how much your subs are doing.

---

Keep in mind your top boxes probably don't need to go low as you think (most powered boxes have a DSP option for running with a sub)
1) They can get in the way of your subs
2) Your subs will be better at producing lower frequency's and having your speakers ignore the lower stuff will mean more headroom for the frequencies they can do).

---

In general adding more top boxes for the same area will not make things louder; it will make things sound worse and cause comb filtering (making the sound very uneven for your audience).

In general subs (same make, model, processing) are additive; this has to do with wavelength of the frequencies they reproducing. Depending how bass heavy your music you may use 2 subs to 1 top or 10 subs to 1 top etc. If you have more than one sub a quick and free way to get more volume is to put your subs together, this causes the sound to couple.


 8 
 on: Today at 11:09:55 am 
Started by Ryan Ashley - Last post by Alec Spence
Sorry to give this advice (I didn't like it when I was in your shoes) but it really comes down to price range here.

Some other brands for your consideration (keep in mind some of these brands are not powered)

D&B
Danley
Fulcrum
L-Acoustics
Martin
Meyer
If the OP is currently considering Ev Ekx 15p and DAS Vantec 12a, then these are all a little absurdly out of his price bracket.

So, the genre is DJ playing house/techno.  So, you'll want obscenely loud, vast bottom end, and resilience when you try to get the first two.

Think about more subs, as a single sub is unlikely to fulfil you - though, admittedly, you've not given venue size/capacity.

Though I've heard neither then EV nor the DAS units you're looking at, they're in similar price ballparks.  Note that the EV is approx 50% heavier than the DAS.  The EV has the higher on paper output, but you'll never known until you compare them if that's a reliable figure.

 9 
 on: Today at 10:02:49 am 
Started by Ryan Ashley - Last post by Ryan Ashley
Sorry to give this advice (I didn't like it when I was in your shoes) but it really comes down to price range here.

In general you will find a certain category of product is often in a certain price range. For example if you spend $500 for top, there are some brands that are slightly better but you will not find anything that feels amazing. If you are spending $2,000 you are getting a different category box. Same if you spend $4,000. More expensive usually means it will be more true to the source (what you put in is what you get out) and capable of more SPL.

In my opinion that has slightly less to do with where it is made. Even if something is not made in China its electronic parts are. Thereby the quality of the end product has more to do with the design and rigor of the building process. For example some companies are quite stringent on measuring drivers (the woofer or tweeter) to ensure they fall within a certain spec before they place it in a speaker.

Personally I am a fan of powered for your application as it locks in the box processing; if you have purchased "Passive Box X" but have not purchased the correct amp/processor for Box X, you are not listening to Box X.

As to DAS, I have not heard the box you speak of, however the few products I have used of theirs I have liked.

Some other brands for your consideration (keep in mind some of these brands are not powered)

D&B
Danley
Fulcrum
L-Acoustics
Martin
Meyer

I appreciate this honest feedback. I am very much a newbie when it comes to sound and because I am a mobile DJ doing small pop-up classes/parties powered makes more sense at the moment. In the future, I would prefer to have a Passive system and a proper amp and i will try to cross that bridge of knowledge when I get there, but for now, I am mostly curious if it's that big of a deal if I don't match the tops (brand wise) with the sub and how that will play out.

 10 
 on: Today at 09:37:45 am 
Started by Bob Faulkner - Last post by Daniel Levi
I looked around this morning and didn't see any X32's with the card installed. At least from places like Sweetwater etc. The X-Live card has a reasonable price though.

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/XLIVE--behringer-by-live-x32-expansion-card-for-32-channel-sd-sdhc-card-and-usb-recording?

Douglas R. Allen

AFAIK only the M32 Live variants come with the SD recorder as standard, all the X32 models just come with the standard X-USB(?) card.

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