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Sound Reinforcement - Forums for Live Sound Professionals - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Live Sound Forums => LAB Lounge => Topic started by: Kasey Linsberg on June 09, 2011, 01:10:45 pm

Title: Simple Hearing Assist.
Post by: Kasey Linsberg on June 09, 2011, 01:10:45 pm
One of our spaces is currently without hearing assist of any kind. As there is very little call for it in this space, I was wondering if decent fm transmitter and a smattering of radios might do the trick, in lieu of a higher cost, admittedly more professional, stable system.
Title: Re: Simple Hearing Assist.
Post by: Brad Weber on June 09, 2011, 01:28:49 pm
One of our spaces is currently without hearing assist of any kind. As there is very little call for it in this space, I was wondering if decent fm transmitter and a smattering of radios might do the trick, in lieu of a higher cost, admittedly more professional, stable system.
Probably not if the goal is ADA compliance or if you don't want people listening to the game or music instead of the event.
 
One of the related issues would likely be the ADA requirement to support hearing aids with T-coils, which pretty much means either using an inductive loop system or having IL neckloops that work with RF or IR receivers.  Another potential factor is that the 2010 version of the ADA has specific sound pressure level, signal-to-noise and peak clipping performance requirements for ALS systems which would have to be verified are being met.
Title: Re: Simple Hearing Assist.
Post by: Kasey Linsberg on June 09, 2011, 03:12:30 pm
Im not sure if we can accomodate T-coils, but it appears all that needs is a different cable that plugs into the pack.

Thankfully it turns out we have an extra transmitter in a rack, that I thought was NFG.

Probably not if the goal is ADA compliance or if you don't want people listening to the game or music instead of the event.
 
One of the related issues would likely be the ADA requirement to support hearing aids with T-coils, which pretty much means either using an inductive loop system or having IL neckloops that work with RF or IR receivers.  Another potential factor is that the 2010 version of the ADA has specific sound pressure level, signal-to-noise and peak clipping performance requirements for ALS systems which would have to be verified are being met.
Title: Re: Simple Hearing Assist.
Post by: Jonathan Johnson on June 09, 2011, 08:42:02 pm
Another thing to consider is what is actually legal: unlicensed FM transmitters are FCC limited to broadcast no further than some distance (or maybe it's your property lines -- I don't remember which). In any case, even if you are within the boundaries, you can be issued a cease and desist order if your transmission interferes with a licensed user's signal.

Hearing assistance systems that are marketed as such broadcast in a frequency range that has been allocated solely for unlicensed use of hearing assistance systems.

That said, the FCC tends to be complaint-driven: the FCC typically only sends cease & desist letters when someone complains, and often they do not issue fines unless you keep broadcasting. However, they do have the power to issue fines & prosecute without first giving notice, so I can't advise you to violate FCC rules.
Title: Re: Simple Hearing Assist.
Post by: Tim McCulloch on June 10, 2011, 12:26:20 am
Another thing to consider is what is actually legal: unlicensed FM transmitters are FCC limited to broadcast no further than some distance (or maybe it's your property lines -- I don't remember which). In any case, even if you are within the boundaries, you can be issued a cease and desist order if your transmission interferes with a licensed user's signal.

Hearing assistance systems that are marketed as such broadcast in a frequency range that has been allocated solely for unlicensed use of hearing assistance systems.

That said, the FCC tends to be complaint-driven: the FCC typically only sends cease & desist letters when someone complains, and often they do not issue fines unless you keep broadcasting. However, they do have the power to issue fines & prosecute without first giving notice, so I can't advise you to violate FCC rules.

And more to Brad Webber's point: doing so does NOT comply with ADA requirements, so why do something illegal that doesn't address the problem to start with?