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Church and H.O.W. Forums for HOW Sound and AV - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Church and HOW Forums => Church Sound => Topic started by: Lee Fontaine on March 08, 2020, 10:06:06 am

Title: Any X32 Compact Experts in Southern Massachusetts ?
Post by: Lee Fontaine on March 08, 2020, 10:06:06 am
Hello:    Our church just got the x32 Compact, and I am tasked with getting it set up for each of our groups and maintaining it going forward.  This is my first foray into digital, and I was just wondering if there are any x32 compact Users in Southern MA or Northern RI that are familiar enough with the board and willing  to assist me a bit,  bringing me up to speed and helping set up for the first time.   Id be willing to compensate you for your time as well.   Our needs are pretty basic compared to some, but I'm just trying to speed up my learning curve a bit.  Thanks very much  :)
Title: Re: Any X32 Compact Experts in Southern Massachusetts ?
Post by: Caleb Dueck on March 10, 2020, 12:38:01 pm
Hello:    Our church just got the x32 Compact, and I am tasked with getting it set up for each of our groups and maintaining it going forward.  This is my first foray into digital, and I was just wondering if there are any x32 compact Users in Southern MA or Northern RI that are familiar enough with the board and willing  to assist me a bit,  bringing me up to speed and helping set up for the first time.   Id be willing to compensate you for your time as well.   Our needs are pretty basic compared to some, but I'm just trying to speed up my learning curve a bit.  Thanks very much  :)

How proficient are you with an analog mixer?  Assuming you're comfortable with, say, EQ - you simply need to learn the 'knob-ology' difference between this mixer and other mixers you've used.  YouTube has a ton of X32 videos to help with this. 

The best way I've learned new mixers, other than the most complex ones - is simply to spend a few hours with the console.  The more you experiment and look and try every single parameter of every single menu - the faster our brain links 'this capability requires pressing this, this, and then this button'.  Maybe make a cheat sheet, with a list of capabilities needed, with blank spaces.  For example - routing buses to physical outputs.  In the blank space, write out the buttons and menus.  Even if you don't ever go back and read it again - the process of pushing the buttons, learning how to get what you need done, then physically writing/typing it - helps cement it. 

Ultimately you need to know for yourself exactly how to get to everything; watching someone else isn't the same as doing it yourself.  It's like changing from Windows to Mac or vice versa - you have to spend time testing/repeating everything to 'program' your brain the new processes. 

After you know your way around the mixer - that's where the YouTube videos come in handy, as you're looking more for things you've missed, best practices, seeing others' workflows (good and bad...).

The absolute best way to learn?  Schedule a time to train someone else, preferably someone very 'green'.  It forces you to not only know every detail inside and out, but also how to communicate every detail in a very concise manner - often 2-3 times from a slightly different angle. 

Lastly - tie each function to real-world use.  It's easy to think in terms of, "routing mix busses to physical outputs is found in ___ menu."   2+2=4, so what, it's too abstract.  Rather, think in terms of, "I have signal coming into the physical inputs, how do I route those signals to input channels?  Ah, here we go!  Now how do I route from each channel to each mix bus? Ah, here we go!  Now how do I route signal from each mix bus to each physical output?  Ah, here!  Signals from input channels to FX units?  Here we go!  From FX units back to channels?  Ah, here!"