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Church and H.O.W. Forums for HOW Sound and AV - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Church and HOW Forums => H.O.W. AV => Topic started by: Peter Kolbe on February 05, 2014, 12:45:35 am

Title: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Peter Kolbe on February 05, 2014, 12:45:35 am
Hi

I would just like some ideas on what your take on this is.

I have programmed a light sequence for praise where :

LED Parcans Fade between Colors about once a second.
LED Strip at foot of stage does likewise.
Parcans facing the stage are on Medium brightness (constant).
Chandeliers hanging on stage are on Dim (constant).
2 Florescent fittings in the seating area on (to allow people to find seats if they arrive late).
The OBY600U Stage Wash fitting (hanging from the center beam above the congregation) scans around the congregation itself (A nice fast pattern, changing color by rotating its color wheel - But not strobing or shuttering).

On 2 occasions During the Praise, i was informed by a steward that the Oby (Which they all seem to call the 'Strobe Light' - Don't ask me why), but he said that it was affecting this specific member that has photosensitive epilepsy.
I did not have any other sequence set, except for one that has all the lighting the same as above, but holds the OBY600 shuttered. So i had to change over to that sequence (to me it is very boring without the movement of the OBY).

Anybody else have issues with Photosensitive Epileptic members / visitors, and how did/would you handle the situation.

Thanks
P
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Cailen Waddell on February 05, 2014, 07:13:20 am
Everyone with photosensitive epilepsy has different triggers.  While there are some generally accepted ranges of sensitivity, there is no guarantee that this member falls in this range.  You could try slowing down or speeding up the color roll, but really, if you make a change it may bother someone else.  So, not to be insensitive,  but tell them if they can't handle a rock n roll style service, perhaps they should look into a traditional service.

~flame suit on~
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: frank kayser on February 05, 2014, 10:45:16 am
Everyone with photosensitive epilepsy has different triggers.  While there are some generally accepted ranges of sensitivity, there is no guarantee that this member falls in this range.  You could try slowing down or speeding up the color roll, but really, if you make a change it may bother someone else.  So, not to be insensitive,  but tell them if they can't handle a rock n roll style service, perhaps they should look into a traditional service.

~flame suit on~
Cailen - I smell an ADA lawsuit.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Cailen Waddell on February 05, 2014, 10:59:08 am
I don't. Respectfully. The ADA requires a reasonable accommodation. If the lighting is part of the service it would not be considered reasonable to not have lights move or change colors. For example, if I use fog or strobe lights, I post that we do so, the patron may then make a decision as to if they want to attend or not. This is different than wheelchair access for example.  It is reasonable to assume that providing wheel chair access would not materially change your artistic content.   What if an artist wanted to do a performance with an artist in a pool?  Would it be reasonable to require them to do it on dry land because someone who can't swim wanted to attend?
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Tom Bourke on February 05, 2014, 01:31:05 pm
Any show I do that has strobes or fast moving lights gets a warning sign at the entrance.  Any visitor has been warned it is going to happen.

In the case of a member with a specific sensitivity I would request to talk to the person.  Find out the specific trigger and compromise if possible.  One such compromise may be an alternative service with little or no flash and glitz.  Working with the individual shows acceptance and is the right thing to do.

Having said that, some people are just complainers and should be asked to leave or ignored if they refuse to compromise.  Does the light really trigger a seizure or do they just not like blinky blinky?
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Ray Aberle on February 05, 2014, 01:36:24 pm
I don't. Respectfully. The ADA requires a reasonable accommodation. If the lighting is part of the service it would not be considered reasonable to not have lights move or change colors. For example, if I use fog or strobe lights, I post that we do so, the patron may then make a decision as to if they want to attend or not. This is different than wheelchair access for example.  It is reasonable to assume that providing wheel chair access would not materially change your artistic content.   What if an artist wanted to do a performance with an artist in a pool?  Would it be reasonable to require them to do it on dry land because someone who can't swim wanted to attend?

Cailen, wherein you are absolutely correct (in my opinion, I am not a lawyer!) in regards to a reasonable accommodation, Frank is also right in that some lawyer somewhere will convince someone that they should pursue legal action. It's a sad world we live in sometimes. :(

For example... http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2014/02/palisades_park_family_sues_bronx_zoo_after_child_swallows_souvenir_penny.html

Specifically
Quote from: nj.com
Ethan's mother, Kelly Yi, said there was no warning about the dangers of swallowing the coins.

Seems everywhere you turn, people sue for whatever reason.

*clip*
One such compromise may be an alternative service with little or no flash and glitz.  Working with the individual shows acceptance and is the right thing to do.

I think that was what Cailen was thinking-- here's the traditional service, that gets the same message across, without the flash and glitz. Frank commented, though, that to deny access to the flashy service is what might trigger an ADA lawsuit.

-Ray
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Cailen Waddell on February 05, 2014, 01:59:39 pm
Ray - you are correct, someone will always sue.  The guideline that we use in our municipally operated venues is to make every effort to make an accommodation, and document your attempts, up to, but not including altering your program and or content.  For example, if someone requests a sign language interpreter 2 hours before an event, we have to attempt to find one. If we do not that is ok, but we must document the actions taken.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Cailen Waddell on February 05, 2014, 02:00:38 pm
And yes - denying entry is certainly wrong, suggesting you attend another service or 'offering an alternative' is not wrong.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Benjamin Gingerich on February 05, 2014, 02:54:44 pm
Hi

I would just like some ideas on what your take on this is.

I have programmed a light sequence for praise where :

LED Parcans Fade between Colors about once a second.
LED Strip at foot of stage does likewise.
Parcans facing the stage are on Medium brightness (constant).
Chandeliers hanging on stage are on Dim (constant).
2 Florescent fittings in the seating area on (to allow people to find seats if they arrive late).
The OBY600U Stage Wash fitting (hanging from the center beam above the congregation) scans around the congregation itself (A nice fast pattern, changing color by rotating its color wheel - But not strobing or shuttering).

On 2 occasions During the Praise, i was informed by a steward that the Oby (Which they all seem to call the 'Strobe Light' - Don't ask me why), but he said that it was affecting this specific member that has photosensitive epilepsy.
I did not have any other sequence set, except for one that has all the lighting the same as above, but holds the OBY600 shuttered. So i had to change over to that sequence (to me it is very boring without the movement of the OBY).

Anybody else have issues with Photosensitive Epileptic members / visitors, and how did/would you handle the situation.

Thanks
P

My wife has epilepsy thats triggered by lighting sometimes, and being that she is a vocalist on stages for conferences and services of all kinds I took it upon myself to figure out what would work for her but still look how I would want it too.
 
I have found that color changes over a longer duration (1sec+), I use more rotating lights and less flashes, and bringing the house lights up just a little bit really makes a difference. However over the last 6 years I have found this helps most people with similar conditions; it does not work for everyone. In those special cases I do what i can to accommodate them and if it doesn't help, point them to a more traditional service or to somewhere we broadcast the whole service/conference too.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Jason Glass on February 05, 2014, 06:09:49 pm
Hi

I would just like some ideas on what your take on this is.

I have programmed a light sequence for praise where :

LED Parcans Fade between Colors about once a second.
LED Strip at foot of stage does likewise.
Parcans facing the stage are on Medium brightness (constant).
Chandeliers hanging on stage are on Dim (constant).
2 Florescent fittings in the seating area on (to allow people to find seats if they arrive late).
The OBY600U Stage Wash fitting (hanging from the center beam above the congregation) scans around the congregation itself (A nice fast pattern, changing color by rotating its color wheel - But not strobing or shuttering).

On 2 occasions During the Praise, i was informed by a steward that the Oby (Which they all seem to call the 'Strobe Light' - Don't ask me why), but he said that it was affecting this specific member that has photosensitive epilepsy.
I did not have any other sequence set, except for one that has all the lighting the same as above, but holds the OBY600 shuttered. So i had to change over to that sequence (to me it is very boring without the movement of the OBY).

Anybody else have issues with Photosensitive Epileptic members / visitors, and how did/would you handle the situation.

Thanks
P

Perhaps your church could supply this person with a free pair of dark sunglasses to wear during the service.  It's all supposed to be about receiving the word, anyway, right?
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Brad Weber on February 06, 2014, 04:41:51 pm
I don't. Respectfully. The ADA requires a reasonable accommodation. If the lighting is part of the service it would not be considered reasonable to not have lights move or change colors. For example, if I use fog or strobe lights, I post that we do so, the patron may then make a decision as to if they want to attend or not. This is different than wheelchair access for example.  It is reasonable to assume that providing wheel chair access would not materially change your artistic content.   What if an artist wanted to do a performance with an artist in a pool?  Would it be reasonable to require them to do it on dry land because someone who can't swim wanted to attend?
In terms of ADA I think you are getting into very disparate areas when you address the content versus the venue.  In this case it is apparently not the physical installation that is at issue but rather the use and programming.  That would seem to at the least be addressed by different portions of the ADA, if even covered.
 
As far as it being part of the performance or service, the programming is an artistic choice but the flip side seems to be that it is then indeed a choice and not a required function or element.  I can see having a difficult time justifying including continuing to include an elective programming element once you have been made aware of it negatively impacting participants or audience members.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: frank kayser on February 06, 2014, 05:52:27 pm
In terms of ADA I think you are getting into very disparate areas when you address the content versus the venue.  In this case it is apparently not the physical installation that is at issue but rather the use and programming.  That would seem to at the least be addressed by different portions of the ADA, if even covered.
 
As far as it being part of the performance or service, the programming is an artistic choice but the flip side seems to be that it is then indeed a choice and not a required function or element.  I can see having a difficult time justifying including continuing to include an elective programming element once you have been made aware of it negatively impacting participants or audience members.

+1
Nailed it, Brad.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Cailen Waddell on February 06, 2014, 07:39:04 pm
Respectfully I disagree and I am 90% sure the ADA does as well. Artistic elements, if considered a required function or element in the opinion of the artist, do not have to be changed. 

Lighting is not elective. Just like sound isn't elective.  If someone has tinnitus and the sound is too loud for them, do you turn it down just for them?  Nope, you offer them earplugs or a more traditional lower volume service. 

While I will say that I am not a lawyer or ADA expert, I did give our disability services coordinator a call and she confirmed my understanding of the law and confirmed that our understanding is supported and originates from our legal department.  I will add that our municipality prides itself on our inclusion efforts and we go to great lengths to be as inclusive as possible....

I suppose I am surprised at what you guys consider required and your approach to artistic choice.

Inclusion and the spirit of the ADA means you welcome the person with epilepsy attend, and offer to reserve them a seat on the aisle so that if they are uncomfortable they can easily leave.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Lee Buckalew on February 06, 2014, 10:28:22 pm
Respectfully I disagree and I am 90% sure the ADA does as well. Artistic elements, if considered a required function or element in the opinion of the artist, do not have to be changed. 

Lighting is not elective. Just like sound isn't elective.  If someone has tinnitus and the sound is too loud for them, do you turn it down just for them?  Nope, you offer them earplugs or a more traditional lower volume service. 

While I will say that I am not a lawyer or ADA expert, I did give our disability services coordinator a call and she confirmed my understanding of the law and confirmed that our understanding is supported and originates from our legal department.  I will add that our municipality prides itself on our inclusion efforts and we go to great lengths to be as inclusive as possible....

I suppose I am surprised at what you guys consider required and your approach to artistic choice.

Inclusion and the spirit of the ADA means you welcome the person with epilepsy attend, and offer to reserve them a seat on the aisle so that if they are uncomfortable they can easily leave.

It would seem to me odd that a church would choose to push "artistic content" over chasing someone away because of their disability when the lighting effects (or the sound level) are/is not a requirement of conveying the Gospel.  It would be very simple to vary the programming a bit to avoid the problem.  Having someone leave or not attend because they disagree with what was said is very different than having the same result because of how it was presented.  I don't recall this approach being taken by Jesus in the Bible.  I actually recall him coming to people where they were in their lives and in their infirmities.
If this is a one time, special effect I don't see a problem as long as the congregation is informed but if this is a repetitive issue then I would think that a church would want to accommodate whether or not the ADA said you should.


Lee
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Cailen Waddell on February 06, 2014, 10:29:43 pm
And that Lee, I agree with completely.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: frank kayser on February 06, 2014, 11:20:22 pm
Calien,
It was not my intent to get either of us wrapped around the axle on this.  I'll be the first to say I do not understand lighting as it applies to church services.  But my understanding is irrelevant.

I remember when the impact and rules of ADA compliance first hit.  It impacted website and design down to its roots.  Individual managers (in a couple hundred thousand workforce) were personally on the hook if their sites did not meet criteria.  That type of "strong-arm" tactic had never been used before nor since. Quite a chilling effect on development.

The other thing is I live in a litigious prone area.

Granted, the example is probably more than a bit off point, and I've become hyper-sensitive to even approaching the legality line. 

You've done due diligence consulting with your legal team.  I'm not a litigator.  Listen to them. 
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Brad Weber on February 08, 2014, 11:13:49 am
Respectfully I disagree and I am 90% sure the ADA does as well.
One important thing is to understand that there are multiple components to ADA and it is Title III and the ADA Standards for Accessible Design that are usually referenced when discussing public accommodations and actual facilities owned by private entities.  Title I relates to employment and Title II to State and Local Governments.
 
My point is that while Title III does specifically address direct facility and construction related aspects, I do not believe it addresses areas such as audio reinforcement systems or performance lighting systems or their use except in terms of specific requirements such as accessibility and Assistive Listening Systems.  The issues of audio and lighting system performance, programming, content, etc. seem to be outside the purview of ADA except possibly as related to employees and aspects directly related to their employment.
 
Lighting is not elective. Just like sound isn't elective.  If someone has tinnitus and the sound is too loud for them, do you turn it down just for them?  Nope, you offer them earplugs or a more traditional lower volume service.
I'm not sure I understand your point.  Performance lighting and sound are elective in terms of both the systems and the especially the systems' operation and related content.  I think the whole point here is that other than the few specific ADA requirements which do not even apply to many churches,  your lighting and sound systems and how you use them are completely discretionary.  You may choose to use certain design elements or operate the systems a certain way but those are all discretionary choices.
 
Given that, while I fully embrace the importance of artistic vision, I personally do not understand an 'artist' for a church feeling their 'artistic vision' is more important than the chuch members' safety and comfort.  I believe that determining whether a lighting programming cue or the audio levels that cause physical problems for some church members are appropriate is a matter to be decided by church leadership rather than by just the 'artist' or system operator.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Jonathan Johnson on April 16, 2014, 03:12:35 pm
Please bear with me a moment... putting flame suit on... zipping it up (whew, it's hot in here already!)...


I am having difficulty figuring out how the artistic choices of lighting has anything at all to do with the mission of the Church, which is to spread the Gospel of forgiveness of sins through Jesus Christ.

Oh, I see that you are trying to make church attractive. Attractive to the flesh? The flesh isn't what you're preaching to, and the spirit cares nothing about appearances.

Might be time to critically evaluate how you are delivering your message. It seems to me you are concerned more about yourself and what you find pleasing than about the souls of your congregation.


Ducking out... quickly.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Lee Douglas on April 16, 2014, 07:24:53 pm

Oh, I see that you are trying to make church attractive. Attractive to the flesh? The flesh isn't what you're preaching to, and the spirit cares nothing about appearances.


Try telling that to the Mega Churches.   ::)

And to add a little to the discussion; I remember reading this and thinking that not all churches are for all people.  What if instead of the use of a strobe light, we were talking about a church that preferred Christian rap music instead of something more main stream?  You would probably go off looking for a church that better suited your preferences.  Put up some signs and let them make the choice.  That said, exactly how important can a strobe light be to this service?   
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Jeff Carter on April 16, 2014, 08:34:04 pm
Please bear with me a moment... putting flame suit on... zipping it up (whew, it's hot in here already!)...


I am having difficulty figuring out how the artistic choices of lighting has anything at all to do with the mission of the Church, which is to spread the Gospel of forgiveness of sins through Jesus Christ.

Oh, I see that you are trying to make church attractive. Attractive to the flesh? The flesh isn't what you're preaching to, and the spirit cares nothing about appearances.

Might be time to critically evaluate how you are delivering your message. It seems to me you are concerned more about yourself and what you find pleasing than about the souls of your congregation.


Ducking out... quickly.

I don't entirely disagree... but what's your basis for putting lighting in a different category from the other forms of visual art we embrace in our church buildings (stained glass, paintings, banners, or statues, for example)?

Carrying the same argument a little further you could easily arrive at the conclusion (as many of my own Amish ancestors did) that having a church building at all is not a necessary part of Christian community-building. Wonder what they'd think of their pony-tailed great-great-grandson pushing up the kick drum fader on the digital console in a 700-seat auditorium on Sunday morning...

I think there's a place for lighting done well, in a manner that helps to create an inviting environment in the auditorium and tell the Gospel story alongside the preaching, lyrics, music, and whatever other art you might find in a church service. But it's got to mesh with everything else that's going on and not call attention to itself and be distracting. Less is usually more.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: TJ (Tom) Cornish on April 22, 2014, 10:50:01 pm
Please bear with me a moment... putting flame suit on... zipping it up (whew, it's hot in here already!)...


I am having difficulty figuring out how the artistic choices of lighting has anything at all to do with the mission of the Church, which is to spread the Gospel of forgiveness of sins through Jesus Christ.

Oh, I see that you are trying to make church attractive. Attractive to the flesh? The flesh isn't what you're preaching to, and the spirit cares nothing about appearances.

Might be time to critically evaluate how you are delivering your message. It seems to me you are concerned more about yourself and what you find pleasing than about the souls of your congregation.


Ducking out... quickly.
1 Corinthians 9:19-23 - it is the church's job to be as attractive as possible to the culture, while staying true to their message.  It is completely reasonable for churches pursuing younger people who have grown up with MTV and high production to have a high production service. 

This is a treacherous area, and I find myself a little torn.  Obviously it's not anyone's desire to intentionally exclude someone because they have a disability, and if the church's vision can be accomplished while accommodating this person, it seems like an obvious win to me.  That being said, if the concessions to the look of the program start to affect the church's ability to be attractive to their target audience (and I'm not making a judgement about this particular situation), there may have to be a value judgement.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Jon McElvain on April 24, 2014, 03:02:07 pm
You made me go look up 1 Corinthians 9:19-23!  I would view those verses more as a call to go serve people (like Jesus did), living among them, being friends with them, but not changing the way I live or giving up my own convictions.  Set the example.  I see this more as a call to "go" than anything else.

As for the specific issue, it seems that moderate changes could be done to see if it helped, but I don't think it's reasonable for any one person to force an entire service to change things.

My church is far more simple and conservative and I've had people ask me if I could turn the organ down when he had a new young person playing hyms with gusto.  I told them that all I could do was to turn up the singers!  This isn't exactly the same since it wasn't a medical condition, but I think reasonable accomodation goes both ways.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: TJ (Tom) Cornish on April 24, 2014, 04:11:53 pm
You made me go look up 1 Corinthians 9:19-23!  I would view those verses more as a call to go serve people (like Jesus did), living among them, being friends with them, but not changing the way I live or giving up my own convictions.  Set the example.  I see this more as a call to "go" than anything else.
Acts chapter 17 - Paul goes to Mars Hill in Athens.  He studies their culture, and shares his message using their culture and theology.

Hudson Taylor was effective in reaching Asia because he learned their language, wore their clothes, and joined the culture.

Successful evangelism of people different than oneself always begins with learning their culture and adapting to that as much as possible - language, dress, norms, music types, food, zeitgeist, etc., to remove barriers.  This frequently does require changing the way that the evangelist lives.

There are obviously some things core to the message that can't be compromised, but if we extend Christianity such that not only do you need to believe and do what the Bible says, but you have to join my culture too, we will never reach people different than us.

I have lived both sides of this issue personally, and have watched a number of churches in my city die because they were unwilling to stylistically adapt to a younger demographic.  I find that very unfortunate, and quite frankly short sighted and selfish on the part of certain older folks who stuck their stake in the ground and said that drums and guitars and any music written after 1950 had no place in church.  They missed out on the blessing of being able to lend their spiritual maturity and financial resources to reach the next generation.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Jonathan Johnson on April 24, 2014, 07:30:29 pm
I would discuss this with your leadership team. Let them make the decision as to how to proceed. Always be in a spirit of prayer about this issue.

It may be that the best solution is to recommend another house of worship in your area that has a worship service that provides a better experience for that member and is still faithful to the message. Of course, there are many other factors to consider with such a move: the member may have family or friends that like attending your house of worship, and that factor could make the move difficult.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Jon McElvain on April 25, 2014, 11:46:12 pm
Acts chapter 17 - Paul goes to Mars Hill in Athens.  He studies their culture, and shares his message using their culture and theology.

Hudson Taylor was effective in reaching Asia because he learned their language, wore their clothes, and joined the culture.

Successful evangelism of people different than oneself always begins with learning their culture and adapting to that as much as possible - language, dress, norms, music types, food, zeitgeist, etc., to remove barriers.  This frequently does require changing the way that the evangelist lives.

There are obviously some things core to the message that can't be compromised, but if we extend Christianity such that not only do you need to believe and do what the Bible says, but you have to join my culture too, we will never reach people different than us.

I have lived both sides of this issue personally, and have watched a number of churches in my city die because they were unwilling to stylistically adapt to a younger demographic.  I find that very unfortunate, and quite frankly short sighted and selfish on the part of certain older folks who stuck their stake in the ground and said that drums and guitars and any music written after 1950 had no place in church.  They missed out on the blessing of being able to lend their spiritual maturity and financial resources to reach the next generation.

I don't disagree that churches need to be willing to adapt to make a connection with the younger generation.  I do, however, think that a lot of churches have lost the message in the "show" that their service has become.  Entertainment isn't the reason we should be at church.  Finding the right balance can be a challenge.  I suspect we would agree on this subject in a personal conversation and it's the forum interface that makes it appear otherwise.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Arnold B. Krueger on May 11, 2014, 11:10:13 am
I would just like some ideas on what your take on this is.

I have programmed a light sequence for praise where :

LED Parcans Fade between Colors about once a second.
LED Strip at foot of stage does likewise.
Parcans facing the stage are on Medium brightness (constant).
Chandeliers hanging on stage are on Dim (constant).
2 Florescent fittings in the seating area on (to allow people to find seats if they arrive late).
The OBY600U Stage Wash fitting (hanging from the center beam above the congregation) scans around the congregation itself (A nice fast pattern, changing color by rotating its color wheel - But not strobing or shuttering).

On 2 occasions During the Praise, i was informed by a steward that the Oby (Which they all seem to call the 'Strobe Light' - Don't ask me why), but he said that it was affecting this specific member that has photosensitive epilepsy.
I did not have any other sequence set, except for one that has all the lighting the same as above, but holds the OBY600 shuttered. So i had to change over to that sequence (to me it is very boring without the movement of the OBY).

Anybody else have issues with Photosensitive Epileptic members / visitors, and how did/would you handle the situation.

Seems like a very intense lighting scheme for a church service, but maybe that is just me. 

My training in worship design and execution says that worship elements that distract from the core message of Christ are out of place.

I've also seen that sort of language used to force personal preferences down an audience's throat.

One difference between a worship service and multimedia presentations in general is that in worship the message is Christ and therefore the medium can't distract from that message.  The goal is to open people to engagement by The Spirit through the use of media, and to not engage them in the media itself.
Title: Re: How would you handle services with Photosentitive Epileptic in Audience
Post by: Ryan M. Fluharty on May 12, 2014, 11:06:49 am
Seems like a very intense lighting scheme for a church service, but maybe that is just me. 

My training in worship design and execution says that worship elements that distract from the core message of Christ are out of place.

I've also seen that sort of language used to force personal preferences down an audience's throat.

One difference between a worship service and multimedia presentations in general is that in worship the message is Christ and therefore the medium can't distract from that message.  The goal is to open people to engagement by The Spirit through the use of media, and to not engage them in the media itself.

It always helps to know your venue you are serving, in regards to technology and the people of your congregation. Whenever I receive a complaint or request, I always ask where the person is sitting.  For example, a comment about too much bass would weigh less from someone sitting in the power alley than someone sitting further from the subs.  Same goes with lighting.  It sometimes amazes me how many people don't grasp the concept that the closer you are stage, typically the louder and brighter your experience will be.

I'm a little unorthodox in that I don't necessarily mind variances in SPL or illumination, within reason.  My reasoning for this is that those who like it loud and bright can find their happy place and those that prefer moderate levels can be happy as well, as long as they understand the aforementioned concept.

I do typically tend to be conservative with lighting, trying to keep direct beams off the congregation as much as possible.  I side with those that would see this as a distraction during worship (not to mention those with a medical condition).  I can't say I've ever had anyone complain that their wasn't enough beaming light during worship ;).