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Title: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mark Cadwallader on December 30, 2013, 10:28:33 pm
It is time for me to buy a better quality DMM to keep with my audio gear.  I expect that my primary use will be metering AC power to make sure that I have what I'm expecting at a venue's power outlets. I'm not a licensed electrician, so I won't be doing tie-ins, but I want to be able to confirm what was done. I'm not an EE, but I'm reasonable competent to do simple diagnostics on simple circuits.  I have several inexpensive DMMs now, but nothing with more than with a CAT II rating, which doesn't seem adequate for my intended use.

Any suggestions on what would be a reasonable combination of features, accuracy, and build quality?  Something like the Fluke 170 series? Something else?  I don't (think) I need anything fancy, but I don't want junk.  I'm open on a budget, but I'm not rich.  I know that good tools are expensive, but cheap tools are damned expensive.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions. Mark C.

Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Nick Enright on December 30, 2013, 11:11:14 pm
It is time for me to buy a better quality DMM to keep with my audio gear.  I expect that my primary use will be metering AC power to make sure that I have what I'm expecting at a venue's power outlets. I'm not a licensed electrician, so I won't be doing tie-ins, but I want to be able to confirm what was done. I'm not an EE, but I'm reasonable competent to do simple diagnostics on simple circuits.  I have several inexpensive DMMs now, but nothing with more than with a CAT II rating, which doesn't seem adequate for my intended use.

Any suggestions on what would be a reasonable combination of features, accuracy, and build quality?  Something like the Fluke 170 series? Something else?  I don't (think) I need anything fancy, but I don't want junk.  I'm open on a budget, but I'm not rich.  I know that good tools are expensive, but cheap tools are damned expensive.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions. Mark C.

Klein CL2000, true RMS, CATIII/CATII, the clamp on can measure DC current also.

Got mine around 150$ at an industrial electrical supply house I use locally.

Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mike Sokol on December 30, 2013, 11:56:02 pm
Any suggestions on what would be a reasonable combination of features, accuracy, and build quality?  Something like the Fluke 170 series? Something else?  I don't (think) I need anything fancy, but I don't want junk.  I'm open on a budget, but I'm not rich.  I know that good tools are expensive, but cheap tools are damned expensive.

The Fluke 170 series is very nice, but you'll get just as rugged of a product with all the functions you need with the Fluke 117 DMM for around $175. Plus the 117 has a non-contact voltage function built-in you can use to quick-check microphones and guitars for a hot-skin voltage. I tell my young sound-tech students that a Fluke meter can outlast their sound career, and indeed one of my current live-sound students now has his dad's Fluke that he used at NPR for 20 years. It's hard to argue with Fluke's reliability. One real danger with cheap meters is that if you tangle with a too-high voltage accidentally, the meter itself can become a bomb and launch exploding parts at you with very bad results. So it's good that you're getting rid of your cheap meters. 
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Craig Hauber on December 31, 2013, 12:20:14 am
For checking hard-used outlets in crappy venues I recommend a wiggy (solenoid) type tester.  The fluke equivalent modernizes the whole concept and adds digital readout.

http://en-us.fluke.com/products/electrical-testers/fluke-t-plus-pro-electrical-tester.html

Another good Fluke meter is the 376 clamp with the flex-loop -gives you AC/DC volts, ohms/continuity beep as well as clamp current and their new flex loop for those tough to reach conductors.  I think it also has inrush recording for turn-on surge measurement

http://en-us.fluke.com/products/clamp-meters/fluke-376-clamp-meter.html

It is time for me to buy a better quality DMM to keep with my audio gear.  I expect that my primary use will be metering AC power to make sure that I have what I'm expecting at a venue's power outlets. I'm not a licensed electrician, so I won't be doing tie-ins, but I want to be able to confirm what was done. I'm not an EE, but I'm reasonable competent to do simple diagnostics on simple circuits.  I have several inexpensive DMMs now, but nothing with more than with a CAT II rating, which doesn't seem adequate for my intended use.

Any suggestions on what would be a reasonable combination of features, accuracy, and build quality?  Something like the Fluke 170 series? Something else?  I don't (think) I need anything fancy, but I don't want junk.  I'm open on a budget, but I'm not rich.  I know that good tools are expensive, but cheap tools are damned expensive.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions. Mark C.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Tom Bourke on December 31, 2013, 06:58:21 am
I just got a Fluke 325 and love it.
I also got a Fluke LVD1 my key-ring. 
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Stephen Swaffer on December 31, 2013, 08:50:19 am
The Fluke 170 series is very nice, but you'll get just as rugged of a product with all the functions you need with the Fluke 117 DMM for around $175. Plus the 117 has a non-contact voltage function built-in you can use to quick-check microphones and guitars for a hot-skin voltage. I tell my young sound-tech students that a Fluke meter can outlast their sound career, and indeed one of my current live-sound students now has his dad's Fluke that he used at NPR for 20 years. It's hard to argue with Fluke's reliability. One real danger with cheap meters is that if you tangle with a too-high voltage accidentally, the meter itself can become a bomb and launch exploding parts at you with very bad results. So it's good that you're getting rid of your cheap meters.

+1

If money is an issue keep your eyes open-I have 4 Flukes in vehicles/shop and have yet to pay full price-and 2 were new or like new when I got them.  Picked up an older 70 series at a second hand shop a couple months ago (in box and leads still factory wrapped) for $15 and worth more than many meters priced 5 times that in my opinion and worth being patient to get. I have only ever seen one Fluke that would not work-and that was because somebody tried to measure open circuit volts on a TIG welder with the hi freq start on-not really fair to the meter.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mike Sokol on December 31, 2013, 10:37:38 am
For those of you on a tight budget who don't have the time to cruise the pawn shops for a Fluke, Klein has a new MM500 "Tough Meter" which works well. While it's a very basic meter, it will do all the measurements needed to check power at a gig. Plus it's rated for 10 ft drops to a concrete floor. Klein sent me a review sample a few months ago and I've had a lot of fun throwing it around the classroom to scare students. You can purchase one at Home Depot for $50 which is a great value for an entry-level pro meter. http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/multimeters/auto-ranging-multimeter-0 (ftp://www.kleintools.com/catalog/multimeters/auto-ranging-multimeter-0)

As an aside, I really do like the Klein electrician tools in general. Treat yourself to a good pair of electricians pliers and you'll thumb your nose at the cheap junk.  And everyone please get rid of those free Harbor Freight meters. My dad loves them (because they're FREE) but I refuse to use them.

Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: John Roberts {JR} on December 31, 2013, 10:45:22 am
You guys are giving me meter envy... I'm still using my $20 ratshack DMM until it dies then I'll probably buy another. :-)

JR
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mike Sokol on December 31, 2013, 10:51:30 am
Here's a good article in EC&M Magazine about why cheap voltmeters are dangerous:

http://ecmweb.com/content/does-your-meter-safety-measure (ftp://ecmweb.com/content/does-your-meter-safety-measure)

Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: John Roberts {JR} on December 31, 2013, 11:03:42 am
no love from that link...

JR
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Tommy Peel on December 31, 2013, 11:10:31 am
no love from that link...

JR

It does seem to be broken.

I used to have a Cheapo meter. Now I have a ~$30 Craftsman(still pretty cheap compared to Fluke) that autoranges and works good for what I use it for. I've used it more for automotive stuff than AC though.


EDIT: Here's a good link: http://ecmweb.com/content/does-your-meter-safety-measure (http://ecmweb.com/content/does-your-meter-safety-measure)
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mike Sokol on December 31, 2013, 11:17:15 am
no love from that link...

JR

Hmmmmm.... Try pasting it directly into your browser. I see that it has a problem connecting directly from this page: http://ecmweb.com/content/does-your-meter-safety-measure
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: John Roberts {JR} on December 31, 2013, 11:35:19 am
Hmmmmm.... Try pasting it directly into your browser. I see that it has a problem connecting directly from this page: http://ecmweb.com/content/does-your-meter-safety-measure

OK.. the second link works fine... It appears you clicked on the FTP button instead of URL button when posting the link the first time.

======

OK yes, know your test equipment.. my cheapo ratshack has printed right on the front that - lead is 500V max, + lead is 600V max, and the current lead is 10A unfused. No problem for me, but if you plan to meter 600V lines get the appropriate meter for the gig.

I still miss my old Simpson 260, that wasn't really mine, or I'd still have it.

Always use common sense with any meter.. if the reading doesn't make sense, maybe it's wrong... triangulate and understand that the result is plausible. Kind of like the old days when we designed circuits with slide rules we had to do the ballpark math in our head, and then use the slide rule for the final value precision. with digital calculators and digital meters we have a tendency to trust the results, more than is deserved.

JR
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mike Sokol on December 31, 2013, 12:36:45 pm
Always use common sense with any meter.. if the reading doesn't make sense, maybe it's wrong... triangulate and understand that the result is plausible.

That's great advice. I make my basic electronics class students predict what a meter reading should be BEFORE they go poking the leads into the circuit. We also discuss what strange meter readings can mean. For instance, some of the cheap meters require a second button push to get into AC voltage mode, rather than the default DC voltage mode. Some will read 0 volts DC when testing 120-volts AC, while others will read 170 volts (the peak value of 120 volts RMS). That's a great teaching moment when I can reinforce that you should never rely on one reading to assure you a circuit is OFF. I will check to see if a circuit is off several ways first before trusting it at all, and then I always brush the wire with a knuckle first to triple check it's off. Even then its still hard for me to put two hands in a panel since I was trained to keep my unused hand in my back pocket. The one time I came close to dying was when I had one hand on the chassis and the other hand on a screwdriver. I slipped with the screwdriver and took 600 Volts DC from hand-to-hand, which is basically what a defibrillator does. Knocked me out and afterwards it felt like I'd been kicked down a flight of stairs.  I don't like getting shocked any more. It generally means I was doing something stupid.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Frank DeWitt on December 31, 2013, 12:52:37 pm
Years ago I figured out the hard way that there are two problems with cheep tools.  First, you own a cheep tool that doesn't work as well as a quality tool.  Second you own that tool so it is hard to justify replacing it with a good one.

I now buy quality even if I have to buy old used quality rather then new cheep.  There are working Fluke DMM on Ebay starting at $30
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Lyle Williams on December 31, 2013, 01:49:10 pm
The 170-series looked great until I looked up the price.  I wouldn't spend that kind of money on a DMM.  Buy something good, but buy something cheaper.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Stephen Swaffer on December 31, 2013, 06:40:13 pm
I don't like getting shocked any more. It generally means I was doing something stupid.

Hate that feeling.  Lecturing yourself isn't nearly as fun as lecturing students, is it?

If I were going to spring for a 170 Series, I'd be tempted to look really hard at the 233.  That removable display would almost be as like being in two places at once at times..
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Jonathan Johnson on January 02, 2014, 01:32:46 am
The trouble with too many meters is that you need three hands: one to hold the red lead, one to hold the black lead, and one to hold the meter.

Consider a meter that has a clip to hold at least one lead, so you can do two things with one hand.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mike Sokol on January 02, 2014, 07:32:57 am
The trouble with too many meters is that you need three hands: one to hold the red lead, one to hold the black lead, and one to hold the meter.

Consider a meter that has a clip to hold at least one lead, so you can do two things with one hand.

At least a few of my meters have a clip on the back for both meter leads spaced exactly to fit an Edison outlet's Hot and Neutral slots. So you can poke the meter at the receptacle with one hand to measure the voltage. Also, you can get hanging magnet clips for the Fluke meters that lets you hang the meter to any metal panel. 
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Steve M Smith on January 02, 2014, 08:36:43 am
That's great advice. I make my basic electronics class students predict what a meter reading should be BEFORE they go poking the leads into the circuit.

Or even better, what it could be.

At least a few of my meters have a clip on the back for both meter leads spaced exactly to fit an Edison outlet's Hot and Neutral slots

No covers over the slots?  Our sockets have covers over live and neutral which are moved out of the way by the insertion of earth pin.


Steve.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: John Roberts {JR} on January 02, 2014, 09:42:02 am
Years ago I figured out the hard way that there are two problems with cheep tools.  First, you own a cheep tool that doesn't work as well as a quality tool.  Second you own that tool so it is hard to justify replacing it with a good one.

I now buy quality even if I have to buy old used quality rather then new cheep.  There are working Fluke DMM on Ebay starting at $30
I probably have a somewhat different perspective on this after spending 15 years designing "value" sound gear. There is often confusion between low quality and a reduced feature set. Being intimately familiar with what is going on under the hood, there is often a significant price premium in name brands that in my judgement is more about the name and not justified by the internal content. 

There is nothing wrong with buying premium gear if it makes you feel good. You can find quality gear across the full range of prices and feature sets. Of course these days you can also find tools and gear that are too cheap to work... This is true of the components that go inside gear too. I rejected as many new component vendors as I approved while working at Peavey.

YMMV

JR
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mike Sokol on January 02, 2014, 11:51:00 am
No covers over the slots?  Our sockets have covers over live and neutral which are moved out of the way by the insertion of earth pin.

Covers on the slots??? You must be kidding. Here in AMERICA we give everyone the same right to easy electrocution.

Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Jonathan Johnson on January 02, 2014, 12:39:52 pm
Covers on the slots??? You must be kidding. Here in AMERICA we give everyone the same right to easy electrocution.

Here in North America we now have available "tamper-resistant" receptacles (http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/SectionDisplay.jsp?section=37692), which have shutters over the current-carrying (120V hot and 0V neutral) slots. These shutters are designed to block entry into a single slot; both prongs must enter simultaneously in order for the shutters to open.

Because NA standards allow for ungrounded, two-wire devices, it's not feasible to create a receptacle which requires insertion of the ground pin to release the shutters.

Apparently, the 2008 NEC requires tamper-resistant receptacles in all new residential housing. I wouldn't be surprised if it soon expanded to include commercial applications. I've actually started replacing the receptacles in my church with TR, as we've got a lot of little kids running around there.




Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Mark Cadwallader on January 02, 2014, 10:53:44 pm
Thanks to all for the suggestions and thoughts. My cheap multimeters are the $25 ones from Sears or RatShack; more suited to motorcycle and automotive use (which was their original purpose).

I think that I will be looking for a Fluke 117. As noted, the 177 looks great, but seemed to me to be rather pricey. I'm glad to hear that I don't need to spend that much for a reasonable quality tool.  The dedicated power meters look nice, but I think that a DMM is a better place to build from. Mark C.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Guy Holt on May 27, 2015, 11:24:37 am
Always use common sense with any meter.. if the reading doesn't make sense, maybe it's wrong... triangulate and understand that the result is plausible.

That's great advice. I make my basic electronics class students predict what a meter reading should be BEFORE they go poking the leads into the circuit. We also discuss what strange meter readings can mean.

In the IATSE Local 481 Power Quality Workshop I developed we do an exercise where the students meter the voltage and current on a putt-putt generator (non-inverter type) while running a non-pfc 2.5kW HMI light.   Since, invariably, the meters brought by the students range in quality, the readings they get range from being 84% over to 40% under what they should be. We then so the same exercise with tungsten lights dimmed on a Strand pack and find the results range from 13% over and 16% under. The discrepancy in the results is a good jumping off point for a discussion about how meters work and that they can be mislead by distorted waveforms. To see why use this link: http://www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/emailnewsletter_generators.html#anchorMeters  (http://www.screenlightandgrip.com/html/emailnewsletter_generators.html#anchorMeters)

Guy Holt, Gaffer
ScreenLight & Grip
www.screenlightandgrip.com
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Frank DeWitt on December 11, 2017, 02:58:40 pm
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Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: John Roberts {JR} on December 11, 2017, 03:14:52 pm
Since I just bought a low/mid range Fluke (107), and a low end chinese wonder I looked at the specs for a chuckle.

The Fluke specs something like +/- 0.5% with no other qualification besides a 0.1% tempco.

The cheap meter spec'd a similar +/- 0.5-0.8% basic accuracy in DC range but with a remarkable +2 or +3 (%?) If it 3% high the 0.5% basic accuracy doesn't much matter.

AC is worse with +/-2% + 10 (%?)

So on paper still better than Guy's experience. I suspect most of his students errors are due to squirrely rectification and frequency response, but you would hope even cheap meters target response to be correct for 50-60 Hz.

JR
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: TJ (Tom) Cornish on December 11, 2017, 03:16:10 pm
A old topic but I think worth bringing back for a nice meter find.  Eventek ET820 Digital Clamp Multimeter $25.69 on Amazon.  What sold me is the 2 amp full scale clamp on range.  Nice for finding ground loops.  It also has a built in NCVD and a lighted readout and a flashlight.

I still love my Fluke multimeter but this cheep meter will be the one in my Gig bag.

https://www.amazon.com/Eventek-Auto-ranging-Multimeter-Non-contact-Capacitance/dp/B06Y5W19F9/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1513021787&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=eventex+amp+meter (https://www.amazon.com/Eventek-Auto-ranging-Multimeter-Non-contact-Capacitance/dp/B06Y5W19F9/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1513021787&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=eventex+amp+meter)
This meter claims no safety ratings (at least on the Amazon page).  Maybe I'm cynical, but $25 doesn't seem enough money for the safety features I want if I'm metering line voltage - especially a high-current source.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Frank DeWitt on December 11, 2017, 04:48:34 pm
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Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Frank DeWitt on December 12, 2017, 08:12:12 am
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Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Matt Errend on December 13, 2017, 04:37:22 pm
Molded into the back of the meter above
Conforms to
IEE 61010-1
IEC 61010-2-032
600V CAT.3
CE

Unfortunately, it's easy for Chinese OEMs to burn in the certification markings into their DMMs, but never actually have them certified. There are numerous videos online of DMMs with CAT/UL/CE/IEC ratings failing to meet their ratings. Dave Jones of EEVblog has a bunch of great multimeter review videos, and has some excellent explanations as to why some meters are worth it, and why some aren't. For example, this "CAT IV" rated meter has $.01 glass fuses on it's inputs, and would never hold up to certification. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2Tkm21dI1g

If you're playing with low voltage electronics, buy whatever, maybe it will work well, maybe it wont. But if you're probing on and around 200V+ circuits, buy something worth owning and learn how to use it, safely.

Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Tim McCulloch on December 13, 2017, 08:43:45 pm
Unfortunately, it's easy for Chinese OEMs to burn in the certification markings into their DMMs, but never actually have them certified. There are numerous videos online of DMMs with CAT/UL/CE/IEC ratings failing to meet their ratings. Dave Jones of EEVblog has a bunch of great multimeter review videos, and has some excellent explanations as to why some meters are worth it, and why some aren't. For example, this "CAT IV" rated meter has $.01 glass fuses on it's inputs, and would never hold up to certification. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2Tkm21dI1g

If you're playing with low voltage electronics, buy whatever, maybe it will work well, maybe it wont. But if you're probing on and around 200V+ circuits, buy something worth owning and learn how to use it, safely.

I do not doubt there are fraudulently labeled products but there is no way of knowing, 100%, that any given product in our hands has been engineered, tested and certified to a particular standard - all we have is the manufacturer's declaration of conformity.

Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Stephen Swaffer on December 13, 2017, 09:05:57 pm
I do not doubt there are fraudulently labeled products but there is no way of knowing, 100%, that any given product in our hands has been engineered, tested and certified to a particular standard - all we have is the manufacturer's declaration of conformity.

So the real question is "Do you trust the manufacturer (and that assumes you know who manufactures it)?  That is where using a name brand that has built it's business on providing quality tools does in fact pay off.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Chris Hindle on December 14, 2017, 08:23:26 am
I do not doubt there are fraudulently labeled products but there is no way of knowing, 100%, that any given product in our hands has been engineered, tested and certified to a particular standard - all we have is the manufacturer's declaration of conformity.
Tim, that'll mean a lot to my widow, as she chases down some Chinese supplier for an explanation on how I got zapped.
Just get a Fluke.
End of discussion.
Chris.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Tim McCulloch on December 14, 2017, 02:07:15 pm
Steve, Chris, I'm pointing out that all we have is the manufacturer's *statement*.  That Fluke or Amprobe or Triplette or HP.... have track records of meeting their declarations and specs is a good thing and not one I'm dismissing.

I'm only saying that absent personal experience or anecdotal evidence of failure of a specific product, we *really* don't know, do we?

And no, I don't own cheap knock-off meters... 8) 
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Matt Errend on December 14, 2017, 04:23:04 pm
I do not doubt there are fraudulently labeled products but there is no way of knowing, 100%, that any given product in our hands has been engineered, tested and certified to a particular standard - all we have is the manufacturer's declaration of conformity.

There are import rules designed to keep products that have fraudulent certifications off of the domestic market, but unfortunately customs has a hard time keeping up with all the junk hitting our shores. Consumers can do the legwork themselves and contact the issuing group to see if a particular model/ make of equipment has actually been tested and certified, or if product markings are just lies.

Buying a name brand with a trusted reputation is a good idea, but there are a number of good "value" meters available that shouldn't blow up in your hand if you accidentally put it to 220V while you had it set to measure resistance, but it's always a good idea to do some research before buying a piece of equipment you're going to trust your life to.

IMO if you're doing regular venue tie-ins, or dealing with portable generators in the 50kW+ range, buy yourself a good CAT III 600V or better meter from a trusted brand and keep it and especially the probes in good condition.

Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Chris Hindle on December 14, 2017, 04:49:26 pm
Steve, Chris, I'm pointing out that all we have is the manufacturer's *statement*.  That Fluke or Amprobe or Triplette or HP.... have track records of meeting their declarations and specs is a good thing and not one I'm dismissing.

I'm only saying that absent personal experience or anecdotal evidence of failure of a specific product, we *really* don't know, do we?

And no, I don't own cheap knock-off meters... 8)
All I was getting at was when your life can so easily be put in danger, what use is that "pretty good for 30 bucks" meter, when you can pony up some more for a meter that is trusted daily by so many working electricians.
Bunch of years ago, someone gave me a bargain basement DMM. Back at the shop, I put it through the Chop Saw, and tossed it. One of the Shop Lackies said he would have been happy to take it. I told him "I would never trust my life to it. Why would I want to give it to you?" I told him I'd go halvsies when he wanted a Fluke. Couple of months later, he got a REAL meter.
Chris.
Title: Re: DMM suggestions?
Post by: Tim McCulloch on December 14, 2017, 05:55:50 pm
All I was getting at was when your life can so easily be put in danger, what use is that "pretty good for 30 bucks" meter, when you can pony up some more for a meter that is trusted daily by so many working electricians.
Bunch of years ago, someone gave me a bargain basement DMM. Back at the shop, I put it through the Chop Saw, and tossed it. One of the Shop Lackies said he would have been happy to take it. I told him "I would never trust my life to it. Why would I want to give it to you?" I told him I'd go halvsies when he wanted a Fluke. Couple of months later, he got a REAL meter.
Chris.

Steve, Chris, I'm pointing out that all we have is the manufacturer's *statement*.  That Fluke or Amprobe or Triplette or HP.... have track records of meeting their declarations and specs is a good thing and not one I'm dismissing.


And no, I don't own cheap knock-off meters... 8)