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Title: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Craig Leerman on December 09, 2011, 08:01:45 pm
Hi all,

Letís do a thread on unusual or different microphone practices and techniques that you may have discovered that work well in certain situations, or that you have adopted as standard. Iím not talking about using an SM58 as a hammer, I means like using a vocal mic on a certain instrument, or micing up an instrument in a weird or strange way that seems to work well.  Iíll go first.

I like to use a gooseneck podium mic for an underside cymbal microphone.  I stumbled upon this by accident years ago on a corporate event when I had to mic up a band with just a limited amount of inventory from an A/V company. During sound-check I noticed that I could barely hear the ride cymbal, and we had depleted the limited stock of instrument mics and microphone stands that the A/V company had on hand. I saw a gooseneck podium microphone that was not being used and decided to see if I could get that to work.  I attached the base of the mic to a cymbal stand with gaff tape and adjusted the gooseneck to place the pickup head about 4Ē under the ride cymbal just under the bell area. This worked well, and allowed me ample room to adjust the position to get the best sound.  As a bonus, it was out of the drummerís way and was well protected from any errant stick hits.

I have used this technique many times since then, but now I clamp the gooseneck mic to a cymbal stand, or use a shorty boom to get the mic into position if the cymbal stand transmits too much vibration into the mic.


Here is the way I do it now, using a drum clamp to hold the mic.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: g'bye, Dick Rees on December 09, 2011, 08:21:43 pm
Hi all,

Letís do a thread on unusual or different microphone practices and techniques that you may have discovered that work well in certain situations, or that you have adopted as standard.

SM91 slipped under the strings of a hammered dulcimer, added a 57 at the top for the highest treble tones.  Finally.......usable level of sound from a difficult instrument.

Placing a mic at just the right distance from the line directly under a center cluster to cancel the standing wave.

Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Jay Barracato on December 09, 2011, 08:51:25 pm
Hi all,

Letís do a thread on unusual or different microphone practices and techniques that you may have discovered that work well in certain situations, or that you have adopted as standard. Iím not talking about using an SM58 as a hammer, I means like using a vocal mic on a certain instrument, or micing up an instrument in a weird or strange way that seems to work well.  Iíll go first.

I like to use a gooseneck podium mic for an underside cymbal microphone.  I stumbled upon this by accident years ago on a corporate event when I had to mic up a band with just a limited amount of inventory from an A/V company. During sound-check I noticed that I could barely hear the ride cymbal, and we had depleted the limited stock of instrument mics and microphone stands that the A/V company had on hand. I saw a gooseneck podium microphone that was not being used and decided to see if I could get that to work.  I attached the base of the mic to a cymbal stand with gaff tape and adjusted the gooseneck to place the pickup head about 4Ē under the ride cymbal just under the bell area. This worked well, and allowed me ample room to adjust the position to get the best sound.  As a bonus, it was out of the drummerís way and was well protected from any errant stick hits.

I have used this technique many times since then, but now I clamp the mic to a cymbal stand, or use a shorty boom to get the mic into position if the cymbal stand transmits too much vibration into the mic.

N/D 468 mounted in the circular hole on the bridge of an upright bass. Turn the swival head up towards the fingerboard to control the amount of slap.

Balancing instruments versus vocals in a one mic setup by tilting the microphone to leave the instruments more off axis.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Curt Sorensen on December 09, 2011, 09:33:52 pm
When I'm faced with a kick drum [sorry] that has no hole in the front head, I drop a Sennheiser MKE2 lavalier in one of the little ports. A lot of people have been quite surprised by the results, assuming the drum is tuned at all well. What else could those little 'ports' be for anyway?
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Scott Helmke on December 09, 2011, 10:41:38 pm
Shure 12" gooseneck (MX412, cardioid) on upright bass.  You know how you can wrap a mic in foam and stuff it in the tailpiece?  I work with a bassist who just uses the Shure gooseneck with the body (the XLR part) taped to the bottom of the tailpiece, and the rest is free to move around so it can be position in the best place.  Best place for a mic on upright bass is under the bridge or a near a soundhole, but pointing across the body instead of into a soundhole.

Vibraphone or similar mallet instrument - single figure-8 mic from above.  Works best without a low ceiling, of course.  Gets a surprisingly good sound because there's no weirdness in the spot between the usual pair of mics, and the side lobes of the figure-8 reject a *lot* of the surrounding sources.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Hayden J. Nebus on December 10, 2011, 12:10:10 pm
Awesome thread, Craig!

dancing tuba player? tie a 50' xlr to his belt loop and drop a 58 with clown nose about 8" into the bell. it wont go anywhere and needs
next to no gain.

For piano, a 421really tight under the soundboard (sheet of paper close) adds a warm body to the instrument. This is similar but not identical to a 57+ hand towel in the #2 hole. Most lid and over string micing can be a little thin with an unpleasant attack, IMO. Sticking a good dynamic underneath rounds out the timbre anda adds some low end. I try to make it reject the pedal action unless that means pointing it at a drum kit.

For tapdance, you can use that barcus berry that is collecting dust to supplement PCCs, at least if there's a sprung hardwood floor.

Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Nick Pires on December 10, 2011, 01:18:36 pm
2 Beta 98D/S in somewhat traditional high/low locations onto piano. Great for more contemporary styles. Right now I'm using a small diaphragm omni in the 4th sound hole of a 9' Steinway for a symphony Christmas pops show. Takes a little eq, but offers a nice fat sound and plenty of GBF.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Doug Fowler on December 10, 2011, 05:00:13 pm
PZM 30-D on a shortened lanyard, around the neck of a percussionist when having limited inputs. The mic is pointed wherever the percussionist turns to play.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Mac Kerr on December 10, 2011, 05:10:12 pm
PZM 30-D on a shortened lanyard, around the neck of a percussionist when having limited inputs. The mic is pointed wherever the percussionist turns to play.

I've also done lavs on the chest of percussionists, as well as on the wrists of a Marimba player.

PZM on the floor, directly under the foot of a harp. Who knew they are open on the bottom? Works great.

Mac
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: g'bye, Dick Rees on December 10, 2011, 05:23:19 pm
Wireless lavs clipped to the collar behind the head of a "human mic stand" for theater or chorus.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Doug Fowler on December 10, 2011, 05:57:15 pm
I've also done lavs on the chest of percussionists, as well as on the wrists of a Marimba player.

PZM on the floor, directly under the foot of a harp. Who knew they are open on the bottom? Works great.

Mac

I stuck a Crown GLM inside the last harp I encountered.   Didn't think of using the PZM on the floor, good one.

PZM is also great for a digeridoo.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Cameron Stuckey on December 10, 2011, 06:19:57 pm
Lavs on a halo rig for a moving violin, flute and tambourine players(minstrel band).

I've put a lav at the center bust line of a woman's dress when placing it anywhere along her hairline was not possible. It was barely noticeable with a black dress as just the element stuck out above the fabric.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Mac Kerr on December 10, 2011, 09:14:01 pm
I've put a lav at the center bust line of a woman's dress when placing it anywhere along her hairline was not possible. It was barely noticeable with a black dress as just the element stuck out above the fabric.

That's where I put it on Jane Fonda's leather vest.

Mac
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Jay Barracato on December 11, 2011, 07:12:07 am
That's where I put it on Jane Fonda's leather vest.

Mac

Thats odd, I tried to put a SM58 in the same place and got smacked.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Keith Broughton on December 11, 2011, 07:44:32 am
Old 58 wrapped in a cloth and taped to the stage for "kick drum" sound for guitar player/singer.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Sebastiaan Meijer on December 11, 2011, 08:16:48 am
DPA 4061 Into Sousaphone 8" into the horn, connected to Sennheiser beltpack.
Countryman E6i on kickdrum and on alt sax

All with these guys, quite a challenge to still make it sound like a marching band @105dB:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHhrAIroz0Q&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHhrAIroz0Q&feature=related)
That sometimes ends up in punk-like fests:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fjetM_7vZQ&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fjetM_7vZQ&feature=related)

2 PCC 160 on the floor around the drum kit + kick mic in theater setting where stands where deemed evil by the director.

Sennheiser E865 on snare top: really a favourite!

Greetz!
Sebas
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Scott Helmke on December 11, 2011, 09:36:12 am
Lavs on a halo rig for a moving violin, flute and tambourine players(minstrel band)

Countryman E6 or DPA 4066 for fiddle player - put it on the left ear, and move the boom for best sound from the instrument.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Tim Padrick on December 11, 2011, 03:52:27 pm
Bluegrass band.  Their chosen mic arrangement was an AT?? LDC on a boom about chin high, along with an (unknown brand) LDC mic about belly high and a few inches farther back.

The upper mic was fine on vocals and fiddle, and rather weak on banjo and mandolin.  It was very boomy on guitar even when the guitarist backed off, and this could not be fixed with EQ without wrecking the tone of the vocals.

The lower mic was fine on banjo and mandolin, very boomy on guitar, and picked up (effectively) no vocals (no combing, anyway).

Bringing in the bottom mic to boost the banjo or mandolin worked great (no combing with the vocal mic), but the guitar boom became horrendous.

Solution:  Reverse polarity on the lower mic.  This cancelled the boom on the guitar, and with a little EQ tweaking the banjo and mandolin sounded fine.  A little fader riding on the lower mic gave me what I needed at any given time.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Dan Richardson on December 11, 2011, 05:16:33 pm
Rode NT4 stereo mic everywhere they try to cluster around an LDC.
The pattern is wider and more even than a single LDC,
and the ability to bring one side of the group up or down
has saved my butt more times than I can count.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Bob Leonard on December 11, 2011, 06:26:08 pm
Whatever your favorite mic is for guitar just inside the back of an open back combo amp.

Two mics inside the upper section of a Leslie that catches the horn coming and going.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: kristianjohnsen on December 12, 2011, 04:58:18 am
Two mics inside the upper section of a Leslie that catches the horn coming and going.

I always wondered about Leslies:  If we do the usual "2 mics on the horn" approach won't that equate to the horn running at twice the speed?  I mean, if I stand next to the cabinet I'll hear the horn every time it's poiting at me.  If I mic the cabinet on both sides and I listen to the mics in a headset I'll hear the horn every time it's pointing at a mic, which is twice as often.  Or am I confusing myself?
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Bob Leonard on December 12, 2011, 07:15:00 am
The horn spins to fast. Using two mics seperated by the width of the cabinet has always given me a more natural sounding effect without chopping the sound. The rotary effect remains intact without doubling.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: kristianjohnsen on December 12, 2011, 07:20:29 am
The horn spins to fast. Using two mics seperated by the width of the cabinet has always given me a more natural sounding effect without chopping the sound. The rotary effect remains intact without doubling.

As I'm thinking more about this it would probably make sense to use a mic with a fairly wide pick-up-pattern as to avoid the chopping and get more of the "coming-and-going" effect that we hear from a distance.

I'm still confused as to why two mics sound better than one, based on my observations from before, but agree that most people seem to have best results when using two mics.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Scott Middleton on December 12, 2011, 10:49:52 am
I use 2 mics (in a DIN stereo arrangement, not on opposite sides) on the top because I pan them slightly.  If it's mono rig, then just one on each rotor.  I also like them off axis of the top rotor, makes for less chop.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Dan Richardson on December 12, 2011, 12:37:31 pm
As I'm thinking more about this it would probably make sense to use a mic with a fairly wide pick-up-pattern as to avoid the chopping and get more of the "coming-and-going" effect that we hear from a distance.

I'm still confused as to why two mics sound better than one, based on my observations from before, but agree that most people seem to have best results when using two mics.

Whatever single mic you use is still way too close to the source.
The difference between "horn 2 inches from mic" and "horn pointed away from mic"
is many times larger than the difference you hear from 10 feet away.
Dual mics hard panned make an interesting effect, and convey motion.

Even dual micing pales next to the experience of listening to the Leslie itself in an appropriate room.
Sound reinforcement is compromise. The best sound system is no sound system.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Glen Kelley on December 12, 2011, 01:12:05 pm
SM91 slipped under the strings of a hammered dulcimer, added a 57 at the top for the highest treble tones.  Finally.......usable level of sound from a difficult instrument.

Placing a mic at just the right distance from the line directly under a center cluster to cancel the standing wave.

Dick, have you found a reliable way to mic a lap (mountain) dulcimer? This instrument seems to be almost impossible to amplify if the player does not have a pickup installed. Any ideas?
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: g'bye, Dick Rees on December 12, 2011, 01:35:31 pm


Even dual micing pales next to the experience of listening to the Leslie itself in an appropriate room.

Dan....

How about using a reverb with very short tail and playing with the pre-delay to try to emulate some room reflections?  Adjust depth and FX onset time to taste.......

Quote
Sound reinforcement is compromise. The best sound system is no sound system.

See my tag line......
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Scott Helmke on December 12, 2011, 03:53:11 pm
I always wondered about Leslies:  If we do the usual "2 mics on the horn" approach won't that equate to the horn running at twice the speed?  I mean, if I stand next to the cabinet I'll hear the horn every time it's poiting at me.  If I mic the cabinet on both sides and I listen to the mics in a headset I'll hear the horn every time it's pointing at a mic, which is twice as often.  Or am I confusing myself?

Only one of the two horns actually passes sound.  The other one is just for physical balance.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Bob Leonard on December 12, 2011, 05:17:35 pm
Only one of the two horns actually passes sound.  The other one is just for physical balance.

Correct, and that's one reason a pair of mics sounds best IMO. The horn spins past a single mic and there is no additional rise in sound for a full rotation. With the pair set inside the cabinet properly on either side you have a full 90 degrees of sound which conveys a much more natural up and down / far and near volume/sound effect.
 
I had used 57s for this in the past because not a whole lot of choices existed at the time and back in the late 60's using some silver colored Shure mic which I don't remember the name of. Now I use PR-22s and the sound is as good as I can get it.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: kristianjohnsen on December 12, 2011, 05:23:16 pm
Only one of the two horns actually passes sound.  The other one is just for physical balance.

I realize this, but how does that contribute to the discussion?  When you stand next to a Leslie cab listening to it, you're in one location and for every revolution of the horn it passes you once.  Mic it on both sides and for every revolution the horn passes two mics and each one conveys the sound of the passing of the horn to the listeners.  This seems to be twice as often as when you are standing in one location listening, no?
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Sebastiaan Meijer on December 12, 2011, 05:32:22 pm
Dick, have you found a reliable way to mic a lap (mountain) dulcimer? This instrument seems to be almost impossible to amplify if the player does not have a pickup installed. Any ideas?

While I'm not Dick, I;ve had good success with DPA4061 either single or in a pair gaffered on the sides under the strings. The omni pattern mounted on the board actually has very little proximity effect, while giving fairly decent GBF. High-pass at 200 Hz.

Sebas
Title: Re: Different or unusual Leslie mic practices
Post by: Mac Kerr on December 12, 2011, 05:40:34 pm
I realize this, but how does that contribute to the discussion?  When you stand next to a Leslie cab listening to it, you're in one location and for every revolution of the horn it passes you once.  Mic it on both sides and for every revolution the horn passes two mics and each one conveys the sound of the passing of the horn to the listeners.  This seems to be twice as often as when you are standing in one location listening, no?

Yes. We spent quite a bit of time playing with this on Passing Strange, and I didn't find that much difference in different mic'ing methods. The horn spins fast enough to really mask any doppler effect. We ended up with 2 mics on the same side panned stereo. If you are going to use 2 mics they should both be on the same side of the cabinet or you are just doubling the already pretty fast rotation.

We had no onstage amps for Passing Strange, so we were lucky that we could put the Leslie in a basement by itself, and use ambient mics as well. All that for about a minute of gospel music.

Mac
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: g'bye, Dick Rees on December 12, 2011, 05:44:34 pm
Dick, have you found a reliable way to mic a lap (mountain) dulcimer? This instrument seems to be almost impossible to amplify if the player does not have a pickup installed. Any ideas?

Sebas has given a good suggestion.  I use a much simpler and cheaper method:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Pro70

One of these dropped inside the body of the instrument.  If it was a solo performer I'd do what Sebas suggests.  But the only ones I encounter commonly (attempt to) play in an ensemble.

Edit:

Actually, mine are the older Pro 7a's which went for less than $80/each.  But they're battery only.  The 70's will take phantom.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Jay Barracato on December 12, 2011, 05:57:16 pm
Dick, have you found a reliable way to mic a lap (mountain) dulcimer? This instrument seems to be almost impossible to amplify if the player does not have a pickup installed. Any ideas?

Small pencil condenser pointed across the strings just above where it is strummed (about the center of the instrument). You actually need a little distance from the instrument to let the tone "bloom".
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Glen Kelley on December 12, 2011, 07:21:07 pm
Small pencil condenser pointed across the strings just above where it is strummed (about the center of the instrument). You actually need a little distance from the instrument to let the tone "bloom".

I can see how this would be the case. It's always been a struggle for me to balance the relatively loud "drone" and the melody strings. I guess it depends a lot on the instrument (and the OTHER instruments), as usual. Will try all of the above!

My contribution to the conversation at hand:

Close mic (1/2" or less) a tuned-down tambourine or pandeira underneath, flip polarity. Player strikes with a metal or nylon brush, instant kick drum! SM-57 works fine. If the player is using a snare drum as well, the combination of bleed from the 57 and an overhead makes for a warm, big snare-drum sound too.
Title: Re: Different or unusual Leslie mic practices
Post by: Bob Leonard on December 13, 2011, 01:45:51 am
Yes. We spent quite a bit of time playing with this on Passing Strange, and I didn't find that much difference in different mic'ing methods. The horn spins fast enough to really mask any doppler effect. We ended up with 2 mics on the same side panned stereo. If you are going to use 2 mics they should both be on the same side of the cabinet or you are just doubling the already pretty fast rotation.

We had no onstage amps for Passing Strange, so we were lucky that we could put the Leslie in a basement by itself, and use ambient mics as well. All that for about a minute of gospel music.

Mac

To me this is two (2) mics on the same side. This is not a picture from one of my jobs, but this is how I have always mic'd a Leslie. I feel this method conveys the best sense of motion.
 
 
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Dan Richardson on December 13, 2011, 01:35:25 pm
When you stand next to a Leslie cab listening to it, you're in one location and for every revolution of the horn it passes you once. 

This is one part of the sound of a Leslie. The rest is bounce, which you don't get from close micing.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Marcus Wilson on December 13, 2011, 10:04:16 pm
Whatever single mic you use is still way too close to the source.
The difference between "horn 2 inches from mic" and "horn pointed away from mic"
is many times larger than the difference you hear from 10 feet away.
Dual mics hard panned make an interesting effect, and convey motion.

Even dual micing pales next to the experience of listening to the Leslie itself in an appropriate room.
Sound reinforcement is compromise. The best sound system is no sound system.

I like to get the Leslie off the stage (in the back of the truck is good) and get 2 mics on the horn at about 140 degrees.  They can now be far enough away to eliminate the chop.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Tim Weaver on December 14, 2011, 01:32:25 am
Whenever the right band comes around, I like to mic the drum kit with a pair of overheads and something in the kick, but the real secret sauce is using an omni dynamic (EV 635a for me) right over the batter side hoop of the kick drum kinda close to the drummers knee. Comp the hell out of this mic and blend it with the overheads. Really makes a great "whole kit" sound. The omni picks up all the body from the shells and really gives the overhead sound a lot of weight.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Jay Barracato on December 14, 2011, 06:26:34 am
Whenever the right band comes around, I like to mic the drum kit with a pair of overheads and something in the kick, but the real secret sauce is using an omni dynamic (EV 635a for me) right over the batter side hoop of the kick drum kinda close to the drummers knee. Comp the hell out of this mic and blend it with the overheads. Really makes a great "whole kit" sound. The omni picks up all the body from the shells and really gives the overhead sound a lot of weight.

That is interesting. I have never tried going omni, but I know one drummer who will play the hardware and shells as well as the heads, and do open handed stuff with his fingers on both the drums and his body. That should compliment the overheads nicely.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: kristianjohnsen on December 14, 2011, 08:27:08 am
That is interesting. I have never tried going omni, but I know one drummer who will play the hardware and shells as well as the heads, and do open handed stuff with his fingers on both the drums and his body. That should compliment the overheads nicely.

I was house tech at a gig with a well-known Norwegian artist that had a single mic (possibly a Sennheiser e609) placed similarly to what Tim described.  This mic was connected to a guitar amp (seem to recall it was a Marshall 4x12") and that cab was in turn mic'es with a SM57.  It was used as an effect on one song as far as I know.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Dan Richardson on December 14, 2011, 10:28:51 am
Whenever the right band comes around, I like to mic the drum kit with a pair of overheads and something in the kick, but the real secret sauce is using an omni dynamic (EV 635a for me) right over the batter side hoop of the kick drum kinda close to the drummers knee.

Toured for a while with a very quiet band whose kit was kick snare hat rack. No cymbals.
Crown GLM omni peeking over the back side of the snare and M88 in the kick.
Two channels. Sounded gorgeous.

In some situations I still go for a single overhead, as close to the drummer's head as I can get away with.
Listen from where they're listening, and let them "mix" it. Add kick to taste. Sorted.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: g'bye, Dick Rees on December 14, 2011, 01:08:25 pm
Whenever the right band comes around, I like to mic the drum kit with a pair of overheads and something in the kick, but the real secret sauce is using an omni dynamic (EV 635a for me) right over the batter side hoop of the kick drum kinda close to the drummers knee. Comp the hell out of this mic and blend it with the overheads. Really makes a great "whole kit" sound. The omni picks up all the body from the shells and really gives the overhead sound a lot of weight.

I've been doing this occasionally for live broadcast.....if the drummer could live with it.  Some can, some can't.  I believe this technique has been attributed to an East Coast studio doing jazz, possibly Capitol Records.  Anyone know? 
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Tim Weaver on December 14, 2011, 01:53:41 pm
I've been doing this occasionally for live broadcast.....if the drummer could live with it.  Some can, some can't.  I believe this technique has been attributed to an East Coast studio doing jazz, possibly Capitol Records.  Anyone know?

I learned about it from a studio guy. That's all I know about the technique.

As far as the drummer living with it or not, it depends on how much they want in the monitor, and how tight the kit is set up. It's much easier to do if there is only 1 rack tom.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: g'bye, Dick Rees on December 14, 2011, 01:58:33 pm

As far as the drummer living with it or not, it depends on how much they want in the monitor, and how tight the kit is set up. It's much easier to do if there is only 1 rack tom.

I was referring to whether or not they could deal with the physical presence of the mic.  Some just need the space free and don't want anything in there. 

And I've never had to use that technique and do monitors.........fortunately.  I wouldn't want to try it.  Broadcast and recording only, thanks.
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Craig Leerman on December 16, 2011, 03:47:55 pm
Hi everybody

The editors Live Sound International magazine are thinking this topic would make a great article for the Jan issue and were wondering if you guys had any pictures showing the techniques talked about.  If you do, the bigger the pic the better as they need to be a certain size to be able to translate to print well.  You can post em here, or PM me with a larger one, and post a smaller one here on the forum so everybody can see what you are talking about.

Thanks
Craig
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Stu McDoniel on December 16, 2011, 07:53:39 pm
Sebas has given a good suggestion.  I use a much simpler and cheaper method:

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/Pro70

One of these dropped inside the body of the instrument.  If it was a solo performer I'd do what Sebas suggests.  But the only ones I encounter commonly (attempt to) play in an ensemble.

Edit:

Actually, mine are the older Pro 7a's which went for less than $80/each.  But they're battery only.  The 70's will take phantom.
I use an EV mic identical to this setup and clip it to the F hole of stand up bass/es at a large Bluegrass Fest I do every year.  The user clips
the other part to there pants/belt.  Works great!   
Title: Re: Different or unusual mic practices
Post by: Patrick Tracy on December 17, 2011, 01:16:15 am
PZM in the back of a combo amp, resting on the lower back panel at approximately 30į from vertical (matching the cone angle?). I was short on time and mics and stands so I just stuck them in both amps and it sounded better than I'd hoped. Made for a clean looking stage as well.