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 1 
 on: Today at 02:04:45 PM 
Started by Pete Bansen - Last post by Pete Bansen
I have only rarely done church sound, but I filled in for the regular guy for a church event the other evening.  I spent most of the (limited) time ahead of the program on the band and when the first presenter stepped to the podium, I was horrified to find that the gooseneck mic at the podium sounded just awful and that I really couldn't give the presenters adequate volume without inducing ringing. The mic was harsh and thin and it was extremely difficult to make a woman's voice sound at all natural, especially because the speakers did the usual thing where when they hear their voice amplified through the speakers, they speak more quietly, fearing that they are "too loud".

I do NOT know what the mic is - never had a chance to see the make and model. The EQ was a little funky, but nothing that would have made a good mic sound THAT bad, so I suspect it's a cheap product that never sounded decent even when new and correctly EQ'ed.

After the program I fielded a bunch of questions from church folks asking how they could improve the sound. The regular guy is a volunteer who sounds a little resistant to change. I'd like to help them and support him in getting a product that will give him an opportunity to do a better job. The first would be some coaching on adjusting and using a podium mic, but I think a gooseneck mic that will sound good without breaking the bank is step 2. What I have come up with so far is a Countryman Isomax 4RF, which has a good form factor, good reputation and is in the price range that I think will be acceptable.

In addition to addressing the human factor, how has the Countryman mic worked for those of you who have used it? Other suggestions?

Thank you in advance!

 2 
 on: Today at 12:51:17 PM 
Started by Ike Zimbel - Last post by Ike Zimbel
Haha. It's not like we all know the answer or anything.....
You always provide great material. The kiddies have no idea what us oldies went through.  Thanks for sharing.
Chris.
I forget Who actually said this, but the kids are alright!  :o
I'm doing a festival out in CA this weekend and I've been very impressed with the young crew, both with the soundco, and the young touring acts that come through. Plenty of old road dawgs too...
Thanks for the kind words. We should connect next time I pass through Montreal...we can share stories of various clubs that burned down!

 3 
 on: Today at 11:58:09 AM 
Started by John Woodfield - Last post by Scott Hofmann
Have a look at bodymics.com

 4 
 on: Today at 11:48:27 AM 
Started by Ike Zimbel - Last post by Steve-White
Part-2, the exciting conclusion, is up in the September edition of Live Sound International. I'll post the PSW link here when it drops in a couple of weeks. I'm sure you've all been losing sleep wondering how it's going to turn out...will I crash and burn, give up, and never touch another fader again? Will I survive and go on to a too long career in audio? Spoiler alert... :o

Eagerly awaiting to read it.  Brings back the old days for sure, just read and chuckle.  Had I known what lay ahead I'm not sure if I would have gone down the road or not.  But, nobody knows so we do and end up here.  :)

Dealing with club owners and promoters, security, dogshit load-in/out conditions, shithole venue's......I could go on.....they really captured the essence of it in the movie The Blues Brothers when they played at "Bob's Country Bunker", chicken wire, beer bottles flying, shithole venue and getting ripped off for a beer tab at the end of the night.  Been there done that many times.

There's only so much an elder can share with the younger guys - much of it they need to learn for themselves as we did.  You don't become a "Gray Beard" by simply blowing out candles on a birthday cake.

 5 
 on: Today at 11:34:30 AM 
Started by Doug Fleenor - Last post by Steve-White
How good are the DSPs in amplifiers? I've used XTAs with great success but my Crown XTI amps have internal DSP. If all I'm doing is high and low pass filters are the internal DSPs adequate or will an external processor sound better?

Yes.

the internal DSP in premium amps are generally adequate.

JR

Agreed.

Depends on the amp and your setup.

I do a lot of loudspeaker specific tuning in amps and system tuning in front end DSPs.

I use this format.

Only difference is I don't use processing in amps.  Outboard processing for the speakers with redundant L&R processors up front, then a single system processor FOH.  This provides for flexibility in setup - just add the pieces to puzzle, layout whatever best fits the specific needs, then setup the FOH processing to serve that end whether if be fills, delays, sub placement, or simple gain and level adjustments.


 6 
 on: Today at 11:17:25 AM 
Started by Doug Fleenor - Last post by John Schalk
The Xti models have relatively simple DSP inside, on line with the dbx Drive Rack PA/PA2.  Original ITech amps were dbx DR4800 inside, and the ITech HD are BSS London Blu technology.  Depending on your loudspeaker processing needs, Doug, the Xti may be fine or "not enough".  For most basic loudspeakers, the Xti are sufficient.
There are some nice DSP features in the XTi series, but you can't access many of them unless you install Harman's software and "talk" to an amp.  I use the legacy System Architect program because I'm not managing an installation, just talking to a few amps.  I find the program easy to navigate and you can make live changes, which is not something I can do with my much more expensive Powersoft K series amps and Armonia.  One limitation that cheaper DriveRacks have is no ability to invert the polarity on the outputs and I can't recall if that's also a limitation in the XTi series or not, so that's something to watch out for.  I think the XTI xxx2 series amps have a better limiter in their DSP, but don't quote me on that.

https://audioarchitect.harmanpro.com/en-US/audio-architect-system_architect

Edit to add: The cheaper DriveRack's also have pretty limited PEQ features.  For instance, I tried to implement the bi-amp settings from EAW for their JFX260 speaker using a DR PA+ or 2, and discovered that it just didn't have the necessary range of adjustments.  And I wouldn't say that the recommended DSP settings from EAW were all that complicated, so consider what you want to do with the amp's DSP and then make sure it has the features that you need.

 7 
 on: Today at 10:59:28 AM 
Started by John Woodfield - Last post by John Woodfield
Is it still worth the money for the Countryman e6 or for using something weekly in a church environment could I buy a Samson SE50 or SE60 instead and not have too many complaints. Or is there another alternative to look at? Rode, Shure? I'm using a Shure UHFR system so TA4F out of the box without a stupid adapter like Samson or even the smaller version that Rode uses, I would prefer to avoid.

 8 
 on: Today at 10:51:38 AM 
Started by Ike Zimbel - Last post by Chris Hindle
Part-2, the exciting conclusion, is up in the September edition of Live Sound International. I'll post the PSW link here when it drops in a couple of weeks. I'm sure you've all been losing sleep wondering how it's going to turn out...will I crash and burn, give up, and never touch another fader again? Will I survive and go on to a too long career in audio? Spoiler alert... :o

Haha. It's not like we all know the answer or anything.....
You always provide great material. The kiddies have no idea what us oldies went through.  Thanks for sharing.
Chris.

 9 
 on: Today at 08:29:06 AM 
Started by Doug Fleenor - Last post by John Roberts {JR}
almost..........is right.
The problem with active speaker built-in protection is that some users put that "protection" to the test with varied results. 
A novice may not notice a clip indicator on a cab but that person may notice the same clip signal on their external DSP (if they didn't already notice it on their mixer first provided that the rig is set up properly).

Maybe it's just me, but, it seems that users of external amps/passive cabs are more cognisant of clipping than active cab users....
but
everyone seems to be an expert these days..

By definition the customer is always right, even when wrong.

Peavey had a great deal of success with their DDT clip limiter a fast attack/fast release clip limiter that protects gear while sounding less nasty than hard clipping****.

JR

**** in listening tests some listeners actually preferred hard clipping, which is louder. 

 10 
 on: Today at 08:17:25 AM 
Started by Doug Fleenor - Last post by Mike Monte
In my judgement powered speakers are even better.... the speaker engineer gets to design the protection algorithm.
We can make powered speakers almost "customer proof".  ;)
JR
almost..........is right.
The problem with active speaker built-in protection is that some users put that "protection" to the test with varied results. 
A novice may not notice a clip indicator on a cab but that person may notice the same clip signal on their external DSP (if they didn't already notice it on their mixer first provided that the rig is set up properly).

Maybe it's just me, but, it seems that users of external amps/passive cabs are more cognisant of clipping than active cab users....
but
everyone seems to be an expert these days..


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