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Title: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Jeremy Oswin on May 30, 2012, 04:40:47 AM
A local church is building an outdoor stage amphitheater on private property outside local town.  (Town population 5000, county 43,000.)  Labor is more plentiful than $$.  Stage dimensions are 50' W x 40' D, with additional 10' x 14' wings for speakers (total 70' W at front, exact stage height to be decided).  Current construction is clay dirt filled tires for front & side wings perimeter with clay dirt backfill.  6" concrete slab with rebar will be poured on top with cement board forms along outside of tire perimeter.  No permanent roof - plan is to raise portable roof with box truss frame (incl. lights & flown speakers) if & when the need arises.  200 Amp service currently installed.  Crowd area 125' D flat ground, then slopes upward 75' or so (to ≈ 30' H).   Concert attendance 125-1200, wishfully up to 10,000 or more in time. 

Stage height?  Currently would be 36" at highest point (incl. 6" slab), could be 44" if another row of tires is added.  (I suspect 44" or 52" would be best, given 48" - 52" standard loading dock heights.)

Loading dock?  The back of the stage is currently sloped dirt (potentially grass).  Would it be advisable to place a "tire wall" somewhere along the back and build a proper loading dock?

Water drainage?  It's been considered to slope the stage for drainage, I'm inclined to suggest flat, any thoughts?

Handicap access?  Is it advisable to construct a ramp aside from the sloped bank at back of stage?

Concrete strip in front of stage?  Idea is that center ground stacked sub woofers would have foundation other than uneven grass.

I have lots of questions but want to cover the essentials at this stage of the growing process.  All insight is appreciated.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Jeremy Oswin on May 30, 2012, 04:57:50 AM
FOH Position
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Jeremy Oswin on May 30, 2012, 05:07:56 AM
Stage Right wing
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Jeremy Oswin on May 30, 2012, 05:22:37 AM
Stage Right stage view
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Brad Weber on May 30, 2012, 09:02:09 AM
I have lots of questions but want to cover the essentials at this stage of the growing process.  All insight is appreciated.  Thanks!
Probably lots of question back and probably starting with what design and construction processes and services are being applied?  Then maybe how any zoning and permitting is being addressed?
 
I apologize in advance if I have misinterpreted the situation but from what I see of the current construction, the comment of 200A service for a venue with an audience of up to 10,000 people, no mention of restroom facilities and plumbing or of life safety, fire protection and medical provisions and so on, it at least appears that this is poorly conceived and way over the heads of the people involved.
 
A facility like that must be properly approved, designed, permitted, constructed, etc. and not having sufficient funding to do so means that it should not be attempted, not that it should be done improperly.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Kyle Leonard on May 30, 2012, 11:45:05 AM
Because of the ability of clay to absorb water and tend to shift, you should be using more of a road mix consisting of 70% gravel 3" diameter and smaller. Compact it then add 4" of 3/4" crushed rock on top. If you don't have a good base, the concrete will crack and fall apart.

You definitely need an ADA ramp. Look up the regulations for specifics, but I think it's supposed to be 1" of rise for 18" of distance.

You should also consult with your county building department. They can help a lot, as well as give you guidance for regulations. If you keep a good relationship with them, it will pay back in dividends.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Charlie Zureki on May 30, 2012, 12:22:52 PM
Because of the ability of clay to absorb water and tend to shift, you should be using more of a road mix consisting of 70% gravel 3" diameter and smaller. Compact it then add 4" of 3/4" crushed rock on top. If you don't have a good base, the concrete will crack and fall apart.

You definitely need an ADA ramp. Look up the regulations for specifics, but I think it's supposed to be 1" of rise for 18" of distance.

You should also consult with your county building department. They can help a lot, as well as give you guidance for regulations. If you keep a good relationship with them, it will pay back in dividends.

  +1 

   The building department will be your best friend in this.  I can foresee a lot of extra costs such as culverts or swails to prevent water retention around the stage area.  Filling tires may seem like a good idea, but as Kyle wrote, it's the wrong way to build a solid structure.  You'll need footings, compacted soil, or if that's not possible, 1/4 & down  crushed limestone or gravel.  You'll need rebar & ties, possibly steel.

   The Electrical panel will need to be in a nema enclosure if not housed and protected from the weather's elements.

    Ramps are a must, as are railings.  You'll need emergency lighting for the area.   

   You really need to contact a licensed builder and an Architect for drawn plans.

   Most Building departments won't approve anything without drawn plans.

   Good Luck, spend some money and save it on the back-side, or you may just incur the costs of removing everything.

   Hammer

  ps...I suppose I missed Brads post the first time around, but he's TOTALLY correct, do this, but, do it CORRECTLY!
   
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Brad Weber on May 30, 2012, 04:17:42 PM
This may help, http://www.co.stevens.wa.us/landservices/index.php (http://www.co.stevens.wa.us/landservices/index.php).  I just hope somebody contacted them or the relevant parties and that all required zoning, approvals, permitting, etc. issues were identified and addressed before any construction started.  If not then you probably need to do so before doing anything else.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Jeremy Oswin on June 01, 2012, 12:21:19 AM
Very good comments, I know this is an ambitious project and want to do it right.  While we want to lay the ground work for future expansion, the church's current priority is to have summer services for up to 125 people.  Occasional special events of 500 - 1200 are realistic max attendances, 10,000 is of no immediate concern, but it would be nice to be able to grow without re-doing everything.  The budget is small, so we want to direct it toward the essentials for somewhat low key events now, and add as we go.

Zoning and permits are taken care of.  The church has been working with the county building department and following their recommendations.  A structural engineer, a contractor, and concrete specialists are advising each step for local standards.  To the county, this project is classified as "landscaping," just a concrete slab on private property.  The church hopes to avoid permanent rails and ramps etc. until the budget can afford them.

I was wrong about the clay dirt foundation.  It's actually 30% clay, 70% gravel & top soil, compacted.  A layer of structural fill will be added on top of this, also compacted, then 6" slab with rebar and expansion joints.  This, along with the tire retaining wall, is what the building department suggested.  Water flow has been diverted around stage area.  If there is flooding, cracking, what-have-you, so be it.  The church is willing to assume the risk. 

3 plumbed bathrooms with handicap access, kitchen, and green room are built near the stage.  Porta-potties would be used when necessary.  There is a (200A I believe) service in this structure, so we could potentially use it in addition to the stage 200A service.  That should be sufficient for now, events requiring more power can rent generators.  There is 3 phase power several miles up the road if the demand justifies bringing it in.

The stage height will now be 44", seem ok?  How about a raked stage for rain drainage?  Concrete strip in front of stage (for sub woofers at larger events), or grass (softer landing strip for inevitable stage fallers)?  What else should we be considering? 

Thanks
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: John Livings on June 01, 2012, 02:16:27 AM
Hi Jeremy,

Doing more than "Landscaping" may be an issue.

Someone might consider going up to your 44" inches, with the "Slab" or "Patch" of concrete  having a slope of 1/4 inch per foot, anything less than that may allow water to pool.

This will require the Pad to be higher (Than 44 inches) in the rear to allow for drainage.

First slope the dirt surrounding the Pad to about 1/2 inch per foot, then slope the pad, then pour the concrete.

Compact the loose dirt every 2 or so inches, with a large tractor 6" max.

Measure the volume of area you need to fill, then double that for the amount of loose fill you need. (If you need to fill and compact an area (Volume) of 100 cubic yards, you will need 200 cubic yards of fill)

Plant grass, Flowers...

The first thing I would consider is to NOT use the tires.

Get free fill, Compact it and pour the slab.

Good Luck, just my opinions.

Regards,  John
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Andrew Welker on June 01, 2012, 10:53:02 AM
Something I would suggest, and have seen done in my hometown of Gypsum, CO, is to add a pair of large PVC conduits, probably 12" diameter. If there is something out there, I would also suggest drilling holes in it to allow water to drain out so cables don't get wet/muddy. These conduits would run from either side of stage back to the mix position so that you can run multicore and whatever else you might need from the Mix position to stage without running the risk of the audience stepping on them or tripping over them. These just end in a typical underground vault on either side of the stage. Make sure you have a rope or nylon pull string in the conduit so that you can pull cables through easily.

You'll probably also want to come up with a solution to get road cases from the stage/loading dock area out to the mix position without running over the grass, since it is relatively difficult to push road cases through grass.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Hal Bissinger/COMSYSTEC on June 01, 2012, 01:29:13 PM
Quote
Zoning and permits are taken care of.  The church has been working with the county building department and following their recommendations.  A structural engineer, a contractor, and concrete specialists are advising each step for local standards.  To the county, this project is classified as "landscaping," just a concrete slab on private property.  The church hopes to avoid permanent rails and ramps etc. until the budget can afford them.

Those tires are a nice touch. :o 
 
It never ceases to amaze me what churches will come up with and think they should be able to get away with because they are a church and have limited funds. I find it difficult to believe that a structural engineer or a concrete contractor gave this mess their blessing- unless they are  members of the church.
 
Peoples safety and lives are at stake here. Either do it right or don't do it at all.
 
-Hal
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: g'bye, Dick Rees on June 01, 2012, 04:52:58 PM
Something I would suggest, and have seen done in my hometown of Gypsum, CO, is to add a pair of large PVC conduits, probably 12" diameter. If there is something out there, I would also suggest drilling holes in it to allow water to drain out so cables don't get wet/muddy.


Those same drain holes will let the water in.......

If you're going to use PVC or the like for cable conduits, make sure it's run at a pitch so that any water getting in will drain off  to one end or the other.  Then run a T at the low end and put a large barrel or other catch basin at that end.  Seal it up good and then just pump it out as needed.  But if it's done right that's just insurance.  You shouldn't be getting anything other than condensation in there in the first place.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Andrew Welker on June 01, 2012, 06:21:05 PM
Those same drain holes will let the water in.......

If you're going to use PVC or the like for cable conduits, make sure it's run at a pitch so that any water getting in will drain off  to one end or the other.  Then run a T at the low end and put a large barrel or other catch basin at that end.  Seal it up good and then just pump it out as needed.  But if it's done right that's just insurance.  You shouldn't be getting anything other than condensation in there in the first place.

Good points. I just know that the conduits at the venue I mentioned tend to have water in them for some reason.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Brad Weber on June 02, 2012, 07:13:35 AM
Very good comments, I know this is an ambitious project and want to do it right.  While we want to lay the ground work for future expansion, the church's current priority is to have summer services for up to 125 people.  Occasional special events of 500 - 1200 are realistic max attendances, 10,000 is of no immediate concern, but it would be nice to be able to grow without re-doing everything.  The budget is small, so we want to direct it toward the essentials for somewhat low key events now, and add as we go.
I am very glad to hear you have addressed the zoning, code and permitting aspects and have appropriate design professionals involved.  Since you have them, I would leave them to address their areas of expertise and focus on the functionality and use aspects.
 
I think the biggest challenge in offering specific input is not knowing much about the envisioned use or the budget.  I'm not talking just the number of people but things such as the types and number of events and performances, the resources you have to handle them.  For example, what capabilities would you want to have or need to have integrated so that they are there all the time?  Would it make sense to have everything for the summer services more permanently integrated or is it practical to set up and tear down each time for those uses?  What would a summer service be like, would it have a praise band or a choir and if so, what provisions would be required for the technical systems and the general facilities to support them?  Would the church use the facility or allow others to use it or even rent it for events other than services (which could affect whether ADA compliance is required)?
 
It may be possible to have an audio system that can be adjusted to serve a variety of events and audience sizes but it may not be feasible to do so for the full range of events and audience sizes envisioned.  My experience with similar venues is that how often different types of events or audiences have to occur routinely enough to justify the cost associated with systems and provisions that could be configured to handle them.  What range of uses and events would be considered very likely to happen on a fairly regular basis?  How often do you envision the 125 person events, the 500 person events and the 1,200 person events?  Would the associated events be similar other than the audience size or might they vary significantly in their needs?
 
On a detail, beware of industry specific terminology.  For example, many people use the terms 'pipe' and 'conduit' interchangeably in relation to PVC but they are not the same.  For example, there is 12" PVC pipe but not 12" PVC conduit.  And temporary cable may be able to be run in PVC pipe but permanent cable may have to be in PVC conduit.  I would also be very careful about the use of terms such as "stage" as a stage may push you into an entirely different set of considerations than a patio, deck, platform or similar.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Charlie Zureki on June 02, 2012, 11:40:39 AM

Those tires are a nice touch. :o 
 
It never ceases to amaze me what churches will come up with and think they should be able to get away with because they are a church and have limited funds. I find it difficult to believe that a structural engineer or a concrete contractor gave this mess their blessing- unless they are  members of the church.
 
Peoples safety and lives are at stake here. Either do it right or don't do it at all.
 
-Hal

  +1

  I find it difficult to believe that any inspectors or building officials would allow tires to be used either.  In fact,  since they are compressable or compactable, it makes their use illegal as a filler, or as a concrete form.   I think someone is either misrepresenting this project to the City or County inspectors or, there is no permits being sought.

   There are so many things wrong with this,...for example, there has been no mention of perk tests, or soil run off studies.    The electrical panel was not installed to code. Any flat surface above 36" of grade must have guard rails....at least detatchable guard rails... staircases, ramps for the disabled.   And, there's no mention of runoff drainage.

   This whole project doesn't make sense.    If one were serious in having an outdoor event, but, did not want to incurr the high costs, they might consider temporary staging such as "Stage-right" and set it up and then remove it after every event.  But, permitting would probably also required in regards to safety and runoff drainage.

   Hammer
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Jay Barracato on June 02, 2012, 12:09:37 PM
Anywhere east of the Mississippi all that pile of tires represents is someone shifting the burden for hazardous waste removal to the church.

Even if all they are is a retaining wall, it still wouldn't fly in any area I have worked in.

I also know that here in Md any slab big enough to support any type of structure requires footers.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: David Schulz on June 02, 2012, 10:47:55 PM
Hello all. I am directly involved with this project.

In response to your negative comments about the RETAINING WALL ( as in to make dirt square and hold it) the County Building Department are the originators of this idea. We were first looking at building a traditional concrete retaining wall, they suggested the tires, and said it was a good idea. Apparently, this is done a lot in this area with success.

We have been building structure's (Homes, Commercial..etc) for over 20 years as licensed general contractors, and EVERYTHING we have built is to code and structurally sound. There is no structure being built on this "platform".

"The electrical panel was not installed to code" I'm sorry what? That panel was installed by a certified electrician and passed inspection. Not only that, what you see is not the finished product.

Perk and soil test have been done and passed. We are Commercially Zoned. There is much more going on with this project then what Jeremy has communicated. This "platform" is a side project.

Most likely there will be four to five church services this summer with a very simple sound system.

I will also be one of the main users of this "platform", endangering my life with that 3.5 foot drop off.

Some of you guys are really dramatic. 
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: John Livings on June 03, 2012, 12:45:46 AM
[Anywhere east of the Mississippi all that pile of tires represents is someone shifting the burden for hazardous waste removal to the church.]

+1

Or West.

Is this project in the United States?

If it is, the information I stated above (Gentle Sloping) would still require Soil Engineering and a "Grading Permit"

Hiring Professionals sounds like a plan at this point.

Regards,  John


Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Tim McCulloch on June 03, 2012, 11:03:30 AM
Hello all. I am directly involved with this project.

In response to your negative comments about the RETAINING WALL ( as in to make dirt square and hold it) the County Building Department are the originators of this idea. We were first looking at building a traditional concrete retaining wall, they suggested the tires, and said it was a good idea. Apparently, this is done a lot in this area with success.

We have been building structure's (Homes, Commercial..etc) for over 20 years as licensed general contractors, and EVERYTHING we have built is to code and structurally sound. There is no structure being built on this "platform".

"The electrical panel was not installed to code" I'm sorry what? That panel was installed by a certified electrician and passed inspection. Not only that, what you see is not the finished product.

Perk and soil test have been done and passed. We are Commercially Zoned. There is much more going on with this project then what Jeremy has communicated. This "platform" is a side project.

Most likely there will be four to five church services this summer with a very simple sound system.

I will also be one of the main users of this "platform", endangering my life with that 3.5 foot drop off.

Some of you guys are really dramatic.

Hi David-

I'll address your last comment first.  Drama?  Only because some of us have experienced the comedy of having to remove completed work when our clients hadn't met local codes for the underlying work that was done prior to our install.  You and Jeremy don't say where this project is located (and that's okay), but I think either your local codes or zoning are much less stringent than what the contrarians have encountered, or your local authority having jurisdiction is not defining the project in the way many of us are accustomed to seeing.

I would take the comments about hand rails as an example.  They really *are* needed from both a OSHA and general liability perspective.  One of my stagehand brothers took a header off a 4' stage and is now permanently disabled.  He's covered by workman's comp, but a non-employee on your stage who had a similar incident would represent 100% liability to the church and its insurer.  And I would think that not taking common safety measures would represent "bad stewardship" of funds and of the 'safety trust' placed by the congregation in its leadership.

The electrical panel is another obvious issue.  It appears to be a indoor-rated panel that is installed outdoors and exposed to the elements.  Does it never rain there?  That your local AHJ overlooked this obvious (and in my experience, never-waived requirement) makes me think the inspectors are either incompetent, have an agenda that benefits the churches finances or that the Code as adopted locally is fundamentally lax in a way that endangers people.  Even here in Kansas, that wouldn't fly.

I don't doubt your personal integrity or honesty, David, but what we've seen and been told about this project would not pass preliminary muster in the locales most of us work in.  Nothing more and nothing less.  Some have learned the hard and expensive way and the comments posted here seem to have been offered to prevent this church from having that experience.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Charlie Zureki on June 03, 2012, 11:25:11 AM
Hello all. I am directly involved with this project.

In response to your negative comments about the RETAINING WALL ( as in to make dirt square and hold it) the County Building Department are the originators of this idea. We were first looking at building a traditional concrete retaining wall, they suggested the tires, and said it was a good idea. Apparently, this is done a lot in this area with success.

We have been building structure's (Homes, Commercial..etc) for over 20 years as licensed general contractors, and EVERYTHING we have built is to code and structurally sound. There is no structure being built on this "platform".

"The electrical panel was not installed to code" I'm sorry what? That panel was installed by a certified electrician and passed inspection. Not only that, what you see is not the finished product.


I will also be one of the main users of this "platform", endangering my life with that 3.5 foot drop off.

Some of you guys are really dramatic.


  Hello,

 Well, if what you say is true, then, you and Jeremy need to get your stories straight....   What is it, a retaining wall or a platform for the stage?   I think you guys are trying to B.S. your way through this... and, if you're out in the middle of nowhere, with some ignorant inspectors and other reasons why the inspectors might look the other way...you'll probably get're  done.

  Tires can be used in the U.S. for constructing a "retaining wall" filled with compacted soil of gravel.  But, without MODIFICATION tires cannot be used in constructing a platform topped with concrete, or a  building wall.   See the National Building Codes.

  The Electrical panel, as Mr. McCulloch wrote, is for indoor usage only.  It is not a weather tight Nema enclosure.  By having electrical service cables terminating into the box, it has violated Code. If there is another planned enclosure or housing meant to cover this service panel, it should have been installed before the service cables were terminated.

  Hmmm... Misrepresenting the intended use of a structure is a crime in most areas... A "retaining wall" is quite different than a wall supporting a platform or structure.

  Topping that heap of dirt and gravel with Concrete makes it a structure.

  Lastly, you cannot get around National Safety Codes, whether the project is for a church or not.  You need a guard rail.   

   Good Luck, I'm done...remember, that people that skirt Building Laws can be sued...Church or not....so follow the building Codes

 Hammer   
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: David Schulz on June 03, 2012, 06:40:54 PM
Guardrails will be installed on the sides of the stage.

I was told that box was outdoor rated, we have several on the property. All installed by an electrical company and inspected by the County. I guess we should double check that.

A part of the problem here is that this project is just getting started and you seem to be assuming that we are not doing a lot of things. Such as handrails, and that is frustrating. Jeremy is a sound engineer who is a friend and is not a part of this project.

Are you aware that homes are being built (in the US) with load-bearing walls made out of tires? Built to code and properly inspected, not illegal!
   
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Brad Weber on June 03, 2012, 07:05:20 PM
A part of the problem here is that this project is just getting started and you seem to be assuming that we are not doing a lot of things. Such as handrails, and that is frustrating. Jeremy is a sound engineer who is a friend and is not a part of this project.
I think there may be some misunderstandings regarding the scope of the project and I think a lot of that may stem from the references of audiences of 500 to 1,000 or even 10,000.  That probably suggests certain things to most here that it appears may not be true.  It also makes me wonder if that intent has been expressed to the appropriate design professional and authorities.  It may be that planning for such audiences and the related events is not really an element of what is being planned or supported by the current construction.  Perhaps we can make sure we're all on the same page as to the general intent being used as the basis for the current construction.

Are you aware that homes are being built (in the US) with load-bearing walls made out of tires? Built to code and properly inspected, not illegal!
Yes, I'm also aware that there are significant differences between what a property owner can do in regards to residential construction on their property and what can be done for commercial construction of public assembly areas, so that is not necessarily relevant.  That's an example of why it is probably important to know what we are discussing before getting into any details.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: David Schulz on June 03, 2012, 08:28:28 PM
The electrical panel is another obvious issue.  It appears to be a indoor-rated panel that is installed outdoors and exposed to the elements.  Does it never rain there?  That your local AHJ overlooked this obvious (and in my experience, never-waived requirement) makes me think the inspectors are either incompetent, have an agenda that benefits the churches finances or that the Code as adopted locally is fundamentally lax in a way that endangers people.  Even here in Kansas, that wouldn't fly.

The panels are Siemens w3040b1200cu NEMA Type 3R Outdoor Load Centers.

I think there may be some misunderstandings regarding the scope of the project and I think a lot of that may stem from the references of audiences of 500 to 1,000 or even 10,000.  That probably suggests certain things to most here that it appears may not be true.  It also makes me wonder if that intent has been expressed to the appropriate design professional and authorities.

We do not expect more then 200 people to be attending. This church has a building that only holds 120 people and normal attendance is in the 60-80 range.

The intentions of this project have been fully disclosed to the County Building Department, I feel like I keep saying this.

I guess this is going to take awhile,you keep telling us everything is wrong with this project and we have to second guess even what the building department is telling us?!?!?!

So now that we have established that these are NEMA panels, whats next?

I don't have time for all this armchair general nonsense!
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Mac Kerr on June 03, 2012, 08:54:46 PM
I don't have time for all this armchair general nonsense!

Let us not forget that no one on these forums sought you out:

A local church is building an outdoor stage amphitheater on private property outside local town.  (Town population 5000, county 43,000.)  Labor is more plentiful than $$.  Stage dimensions are 50' W x 40' D, with additional 10' x 14' wings for speakers (total 70' W at front, exact stage height to be decided).  Current construction is clay dirt filled tires for front & side wings perimeter with clay dirt backfill.  6" concrete slab with rebar will be poured on top with cement board forms along outside of tire perimeter.  No permanent roof - plan is to raise portable roof with box truss frame (incl. lights & flown speakers) if & when the need arises.  200 Amp service currently installed.  Crowd area 125' D flat ground, then slopes upward 75' or so (to ≈ 30' H).   Concert attendance 125-1200, wishfully up to 10,000 or more in time. 

Stage height?  Currently would be 36" at highest point (incl. 6" slab), could be 44" if another row of tires is added.  (I suspect 44" or 52" would be best, given 48" - 52" standard loading dock heights.)

Loading dock?  The back of the stage is currently sloped dirt (potentially grass).  Would it be advisable to place a "tire wall" somewhere along the back and build a proper loading dock?

Water drainage?  It's been considered to slope the stage for drainage, I'm inclined to suggest flat, any thoughts?

Handicap access?  Is it advisable to construct a ramp aside from the sloped bank at back of stage?

Concrete strip in front of stage?  Idea is that center ground stacked sub woofers would have foundation other than uneven grass.

I have lots of questions but want to cover the essentials at this stage of the growing process.  All insight is appreciated.  Thanks!

The members here, many of whom have considerable experience in system design and installation as well as general construction issues, have offered their advice, without charge, based on the information given to them. If you do not have time, or any interest in this free help, please feel free to not participate.

Mac
admin
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: David Schulz on June 03, 2012, 09:07:35 PM
You are absolutely right. Those involved with this project also did not seek out this forum.

I want this topic to be deleted. I will ask Jeremy ( who has been busy with a gig) or an admin to please remove it.
Title: Re: Advice Building Outdoor Stage
Post by: Mac Kerr on June 03, 2012, 09:11:17 PM
You are absolutely right. Those involved with this project also did not seek out this forum.

I want this topic to be deleted. I will ask Jeremy ( who has been busy with a gig) or an admin to please remove it.

It certainly didn't look like those involved did not seek advice here to the members.

I will lock this thread. We do not delete threads.

Mac