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 1 
 on: Today at 11:09:33 AM 
Started by Scott Holtzman - Last post by Debbie Dunkley
I am as excited as a little kid.  I have never seen them before.


Going to be exhausted going after dialysis.  Trying to get on the machine early so I can nap.

Ironically I never got to see them Scott (does that make me a traitor??))))..... ENJOY!!!!

 2 
 on: Today at 09:47:40 AM 
Started by George Reiswig - Last post by Scott Holtzman
You should be reading an enjoyable book tomorrow, then...not doing this. But I would really appreciate any help!

Starting with this: how the heck do I even get the config for this? I had to use the UniFi app to set this up, and I just went through and reset the AP to re-create and try to document the process. It's been a month since I initially set it up, but I swear I remember it going a little different at the end, allowing me to name and PW protect the individual frequencies. This time, it landed on "Error joining wifi" at the tail end of the UniFi wizard.

If I plug the AP into a router and join that router, I can see it in the UniFi app on my iPhone, but there's very little info there. (See attached) If I try to just directly access the IP address in a browser, it can't do that, whether I'm connected to the AP or to the router the AP is temporarily connected to.


You are so far off you have to set it up and maintain the config in the cloud.  If you are getting the joining error you have it in mesh mode not AP mode.


You certainly could delegate me as your tech so I can access your account.  You see all your AP's and in one view.  It is powerful yet simple.  We had 20 or so offices in my previous real world life and I had Ubiquity switches and AP's at all locations.  They told me when something is broken.


Works the same way for a single location home network.


I have had Unifi at my house for years.  At the request of a friend I am trying out a new product, Cudy for my house, it is much less expensive and has some interesting features.  I need three AP's to cover my house and I am running fiber out to my new garage it is on the other side of the property.  I will need two AP's for that and I may cover the backyard with outdoor units.  I want to make it clear the form factor and other items make the Cudy unusable for entertainment.


For entertainment, because of form factor (and DHCP server) I am switching to the Microtik Metal.  I need to shim it.  I am using atlas6" mic stand extension.  These things mount on a mic stand making it easy to get them high.  This is a prototype unit I get a config process to Tim that works for him.  That is a reasonable request.  The desktop stand is for demonstration.


So for right now I recommend Unifi on a 90 degree bracket.  I have mine on a Manfrotto stand and the other is on a cheeseboro truss clamp so I can put it up in the ceiling or over the stage.  You can clamp it to a t-bar light stand too.  That is my every day config. 


What do they say, the cobblers kids have no shoes?  I still have a few Apple Airports, the version I personally prefer but those are going away.  My personal wireless in my gig box is a Rukus unit I also got for free.  I loaded their "unleashed" software that does not require a controller.  It's a good enterprise quality AP, I want to add so is the Cisco and Aruba, Extreme, Meraki they are all great products with their own strengths and weakness,  All have varying degrees of complexity.


So here is my current prototype:


This is it on the mic stand


That's not dust on the base, it won't come off!  I know my desk is a pig sty.




This is the Cudy I mentioned, I am just reviewing, it's form factor is entirely unsuited for what we are doing.  It is Wifi6 and very affordable (sub $50),  Cudy has a store on Amazon.










 3 
 on: Today at 09:37:29 AM 
Started by Mark Scrivener - Last post by Debbie Dunkley
There is no phantom power carried on a D Snake, is is provided directly from the stage box.

On a plus note the A&H D Snake lines are not anywhere close to as "picky" as the Berry AES50 lines are to work......and keep working.
I tend to refer to the stage box as a D Snake so I was making the same point as you- that my phantom power comes from my Ďstage boxí - not my console so the ethercon doesnít have to transfer phantom power.

 4 
 on: Today at 02:26:10 AM 
Started by Mark Scrivener - Last post by Chris Hindle
So you're telling me you literally couldn't get through a show reasonably well with say a simple 12 channel analog board and no outboard if your main board failed? Nobody needs all the bells and whistles to make a show go well, it certainly helps and makes it easier, but it's entirely possible to do even a full rock band without that stuff....but I guess some people here seem to measure how good they are by how much money they can spend on equipment.

Not everyone is tasked with doing a "rock show".
Just sayin.
Chris.

 5 
 on: Today at 02:11:56 AM 
Started by Mark Scrivener - Last post by Bob Stone
In my case, I'm being hired in most cases to bring the console that is necessary to perform the functions needed at the gig. For most digital console gigs, a $300 analog console, even in an emergency and especially without any outboard gear -since all "outboard" gear would have been lost with the demise of the single digital console on-hand-- would likely not get me hired again for that gig.

So, for me, yes, I need the $3000 digital console as a spare. And also, for me, even in a worst case the $3000 digital console is a pittance compared to what the former analog console(s) and outboard gear and outboard gear interconnects cost at the time and would cost now (discounting the fact I still have the outboard gear but not in racks which have been repurposed anyway). Even a $2000 analog console by itself would not have the necessary features for a gig without the outboard gear, and why would I take up three or more times as much truck space for a spare analog rig when I could have a spare digital console for only a duplicate of the main console?

For the rest of your questions/comments, that all depends on how you feel about your work, which can only be answered by you, meaning the reader, and how important it is to have a real spare vs. a "spare" that is completely inadequate to the task.

So you're telling me you literally couldn't get through a show reasonably well with say a simple 12 channel analog board and no outboard if your main board failed? Nobody needs all the bells and whistles to make a show go well, it certainly helps and makes it easier, but it's entirely possible to do even a full rock band without that stuff....but I guess some people here seem to measure how good they are by how much money they can spend on equipment.

 6 
 on: Today at 12:26:11 AM 
Started by Mark Scrivener - Last post by Dan Mortensen
Do you need a $3k spare console or will a $300 analog get you through the gig in an event of a failure?

In my case, I'm being hired in most cases to bring the console that is necessary to perform the functions needed at the gig. For most digital console gigs, a $300 analog console, even in an emergency and especially without any outboard gear -since all "outboard" gear would have been lost with the demise of the single digital console on-hand-- would likely not get me hired again for that gig.

So, for me, yes, I need the $3000 digital console as a spare. And also, for me, even in a worst case the $3000 digital console is a pittance compared to what the former analog console(s) and outboard gear and outboard gear interconnects cost at the time and would cost now (discounting the fact I still have the outboard gear but not in racks which have been repurposed anyway). Even a $2000 analog console by itself would not have the necessary features for a gig without the outboard gear, and why would I take up three or more times as much truck space for a spare analog rig when I could have a spare digital console for only a duplicate of the main console?

For the rest of your questions/comments, that all depends on how you feel about your work, which can only be answered by you, meaning the reader, and how important it is to have a real spare vs. a "spare" that is completely inadequate to the task.

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 10:19:21 PM 
Started by Erik Jerde - Last post by Erik Jerde
Since this is a band-aid solution, every dollar spent on a band-aid is one less dollar spent on the real solution.  It sounds like the end goal is to get the speakers upgraded to something much better and more modern.  Just me personally, I'd keep this as the main focus, and not waste any money at all on a band-aid.

You are correct that itís a band-aid.  However, a permanent fix is best case months away and 1/2 of the HF drivers being blown is causing an immediate problem that needs a near term fix.  Itís far better to repair this than to spend a lot more money on a fast but wrong upgrade.  Itís a 140 year old room that needs proper modeling and system design done to ensure that new system best alleviates the room issues.  Till then, band-aid.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 08:47:43 PM 
Started by Mark Scrivener - Last post by Mike Caldwell
According to the supplier it is shielded - I have not confirmed personally. However they also claim it does NOT carry phantom power but it does so......
edit: I just realized that part could be true because my D Snake actually provides the phantom power so ignore that last part! LOL

There is no phantom power carried on a D Snake, is is provided directly from the stage box.

On a plus note the A&H D Snake lines are not anywhere close to as "picky" as the Berry AES50 lines are to work......and keep working.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 07:38:16 PM 
Started by Mark Scrivener - Last post by Bob Stone
I realized not long after getting my first digital consoles that there were mysterious (to me) forces at work with the consoles and their interconnections that were not at all intuitive to me but which could easily (and mysteriously) sabotage my best efforts at providing the right gear for the gig and having that gig go smoothly from start to finish, and next time, too.

Much longer ago than that, I realized that if those goals were to be met as a system provider I'd have to routinely fork over much more than US$1k at a time to have gear that would do what I needed it to do, and to have equivalent spares available at the gig in case the first choice gear died or malfunctioned in a serious way. And the corollary, a $1k or even a $5k error in deciding what was necessary was not significant in the long term.

Putting those two concepts together made me feel that even though I wouldn't use it daily or weekly, having appropriate test equipment to determine if critical pieces of gear were actually functional or only visually functionsal (two very different things!) would be similarly critical to gig success.

Putting those concepts together made it easy to first spend about $300 (at the time) for the Byte Brothers' piece, and then a few years later when I got tired of spending repeated minutes on tests that the DTX could do in seconds, it was easier to relieve my temporal frustration with a 3x the Byte Brothers (at the time)  and get the Ideal Signaltek II to make the same tests go quicker. It also gives a second opinion, which is also nice, because if they're both in agreement about something REALLY critical it's comforting, since I can't see, hear, touch, taste, or smell the potential problems in that area, or, more relevantly, measure them with an ohmmeter or an FFT that is special-built for audio.

I can't help but be reminded by this thread of a couple of books I've read that have been (hopefully) influential on my thinking: the 1840's(?) "Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds," by Charles Mackay, and the much more recent takeoff on that book called "The Delusions of Crowds: Why People Go Mad in Groups," by William J. Bernstein.

Both books tell you how people get fixated on something that is objectively crazy, like the astronomical value of tulips or some other mundane commodity or object, or the exceptional worth of an obvious swindler and con-man or some other hero of the day, and are able to discount or ignore any contrary evidence that would make them think twice or three times about getting swept up in the mania that is only too obvious later.

This thread is a much lesser version of that, except to point out that there's just no arguing with some people.

That also became clear when the cheap digital consoles (Behringer) came out, which negated the need for outboard racks that approached or exceeded the cost of the previous consoles, and people argued against the need to have a spare digital console on hand at gigs because of the excessive cost.

In my experience, when the digital console stops working, for whatever reason, the gig is over. IMO the gig should not be over due to 1 piece of gear dying, since all gear dies eventually and who knows in advance if today is the death day.

Other people fundamentally and strongly feel differently, and there's no point in arguing that another $3k will save you and your reputation in that situation. I'll add that I've never found that NOT spending $3k actually made the gig better, although there have been situations when that particular $3k would have been better spent on something else. But it still got spent, along with many other $3k's and most cases have been for the better.

I think that's about all I'm going to have to say about this subject in this context.

Do you need a $3k spare console or will a $300 analog get you through the gig in an event of a failure?

What would be better to have, a $1000 tester and one proven cable....or a $100 tester and a primary, secondary, and backup cable and a backup for the backup and a few hundred bucks still in your pocket? Budgets aren't unlimited and there is diminishing returns the more you spend. If you're providing sound for Taylor Swift it's one thing, but for us lounge guys we need to be strategic about how we build a reliable rig. Given the likely failure modes of a cable are WAY more likely to be a physical problem than a data problem, I'll spend my money on having a backup cable or two long before I buy a tester. Not having lab level test gear can be mitigated by buying reputable brand name products that are surely to meet spec and being able to determine physical issues quickly.

I think some people here are losing sight of what is practical and what is completely overkill and a bad ROI.

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 05:05:56 PM 
Started by Mark Scrivener - Last post by Dan Mortensen
I realized not long after getting my first digital consoles that there were mysterious (to me) forces at work with the consoles and their interconnections that were not at all intuitive to me but which could easily (and mysteriously) sabotage my best efforts at providing the right gear for the gig and having that gig go smoothly from start to finish, and next time, too.

Much longer ago than that, I realized that if those goals were to be met as a system provider I'd have to routinely fork over much more than US$1k at a time to have gear that would do what I needed it to do, and to have equivalent spares available at the gig in case the first choice gear died or malfunctioned in a serious way. And the corollary, a $1k or even a $5k error in deciding what was necessary was not significant in the long term.

Putting those two concepts together made me feel that even though I wouldn't use it daily or weekly, having appropriate test equipment to determine if critical pieces of gear were actually functional or only visually functionsal (two very different things!) would be similarly critical to gig success.

Putting those concepts together made it easy to first spend about $300 (at the time) for the Byte Brothers' piece, and then a few years later when I got tired of spending repeated minutes on tests that the DTX could do in seconds, it was easier to relieve my temporal frustration with a 3x the Byte Brothers (at the time)  and get the Ideal Signaltek II to make the same tests go quicker. It also gives a second opinion, which is also nice, because if they're both in agreement about something REALLY critical it's comforting, since I can't see, hear, touch, taste, or smell the potential problems in that area, or, more relevantly, measure them with an ohmmeter or an FFT that is special-built for audio.

I can't help but be reminded by this thread of a couple of books I've read that have been (hopefully) influential on my thinking: the 1840's(?) "Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds," by Charles Mackay, and the much more recent takeoff on that book called "The Delusions of Crowds: Why People Go Mad in Groups," by William J. Bernstein.

Both books tell you how people get fixated on something that is objectively crazy, like the astronomical value of tulips or some other mundane commodity or object, or the exceptional worth of an obvious swindler and con-man or some other hero of the day, and are able to discount or ignore any contrary evidence that would make them think twice or three times about getting swept up in the mania that is only too obvious later.

This thread is a much lesser version of that, except to point out that there's just no arguing with some people.

That also became clear when the cheap digital consoles (Behringer) came out, which negated the need for outboard racks that approached or exceeded the cost of the previous consoles, and people argued against the need to have a spare digital console on hand at gigs because of the excessive cost.

In my experience, when the digital console stops working, for whatever reason, the gig is over. IMO the gig should not be over due to 1 piece of gear dying, since all gear dies eventually and who knows in advance if today is the death day.

Other people fundamentally and strongly feel differently, and there's no point in arguing that another $3k will save you and your reputation in that situation. I'll add that I've never found that NOT spending $3k actually made the gig better, although there have been situations when that particular $3k would have been better spent on something else. But it still got spent, along with many other $3k's and most cases have been for the better.

I think that's about all I'm going to have to say about this subject in this context.

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