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Sound Reinforcement - Forums for Live Sound Professionals - Your Displayed Name Must Be Your Real Full Name To Post In The Live Sound Forums => The Basement => Topic started by: Riley Casey on May 11, 2021, 05:44:54 pm

Title: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Riley Casey on May 11, 2021, 05:44:54 pm
I came across this from a forum more focused on hifi and studio gear but it has some interesting FREE software.

https://tradefair.audio/tools/
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Keith Broughton on May 12, 2021, 06:25:43 am
Lots of interesting stuff there!
Thanks for posting :)
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Mal Brown on May 12, 2021, 01:43:32 pm
Ditto the Thanks!   Looks to be some useful stuff in there
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Andrew Broughton on May 12, 2021, 01:46:09 pm
Wow! A lot of stuff I hadn't seen before. Thanks, Riley!
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Bob Faulkner on May 12, 2021, 06:40:19 pm
I came across this from a forum more focused on hifi and studio gear but it has some interesting FREE software.

https://tradefair.audio/tools/
Nice!!

Good to see some options available for Linux.
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: raymondsoly on May 12, 2021, 07:01:23 pm
I came across this from a forum more focused on hifi and studio gear but it has some interesting FREE software.

https://tradefair.audio/tools/

Some really interesting stuff Riley,

Thks for posting

Ray
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Scott Helmke on May 13, 2021, 08:32:36 am
Nice!!

Good to see some options available for Linux.

Indeed!   8)

I spent a few minutes last night fooling around with the "Open Sound Meter" one that looks like SMAART.  Seems very promising, though it has some rough edges.
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Russell Ault on May 13, 2021, 05:08:42 pm
{...} I spent a few minutes last night fooling around with the "Open Sound Meter" one that looks like SMAART.  Seems very promising, though it has some rough edges.

OSM's been talked about a bit over on the "Audio Measurement and Testing" forum (https://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,173468.0.html). I haven't tried it yet myself, but the general consensus is like you say: it's a good way for someone to get their feet wet and it's waaay better than nothing, but it's not going to replace Smaart anytime soon (although it probably makes Smaart DI a much harder sell).

-Russ
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Scott Helmke on May 13, 2021, 05:59:22 pm
Indeed!   8)

I spent a few minutes last night fooling around with the "Open Sound Meter" one that looks like SMAART.  Seems very promising, though it has some rough edges.

Followup - works pretty good in Linux, couldn't get it to work without crashing in Windows.
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Bob Faulkner on May 13, 2021, 10:42:19 pm
Followup - works pretty good in Linux, couldn't get it to work without crashing in Windows.
Nice.

What OS are you using?  I'm on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.  Have yet to install Open Sound Meter.

Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Scott Helmke on May 13, 2021, 11:08:01 pm
Nice.

What OS are you using?  I'm on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.  Have yet to install Open Sound Meter.

Same as you, Ubuntu 20.04.  The only weird thing is that with my Roland Rubix-44 interface inputs 1 and 2 are showing up in Open Sound Meter as 3 and 4.  Otherwise it seems to work fine and give the same results as SMAART.
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Russell Ault on May 13, 2021, 11:11:44 pm
Same as you, Ubuntu 20.04.  The only weird thing is that with my Roland Rubix-44 interface inputs 1 and 2 are showing up in Open Sound Meter as 3 and 4.  Otherwise it seems to work fine and give the same results as SMAART.

Is Ubuntu still a decent distro? I was using it a lot up until about a decade ago (when I switched back to vanilla Debian after I got sick of the Ubuntu upgrade process). I think I even still have some small foil Ubuntu case stickers somewhere.

-Russ
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Scott Holtzman on May 14, 2021, 12:38:37 am
Is Ubuntu still a decent distro? I was using it a lot up until about a decade ago (when I switched back to vanilla Debian after I got sick of the Ubuntu upgrade process). I think I even still have some small foil Ubuntu case stickers somewhere.

-Russ


I am a RedHat guy and run Fedora on my Laptop (Thinkpad Carbon) though I am not thrilled with the 4k desktop scaling.  My desktop is a home built wreck off FVM2. 


With CentOS no longer supported I may be making the Debian swing this year.  The earth may stop rotating if Skyking runs from Redhat (you have to know some of the history of our FreePBX/Asterisk project for that to make sense).



Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Riley Casey on May 14, 2021, 07:49:06 am
Nothing after "Thinkpad Carbon" made sense  ::)


I am a RedHat guy and run Fedora on my Laptop (Thinkpad Carbon) though I am not thrilled with the 4k desktop scaling.  My desktop is a home built wreck off FVM2. 


With CentOS no longer supported I may be making the Debian swing this year.  The earth may stop rotating if Skyking runs from Redhat (you have to know some of the history of our FreePBX/Asterisk project for that to make sense).
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Scott Helmke on May 14, 2021, 09:02:36 am
Is Ubuntu still a decent distro? I was using it a lot up until about a decade ago (when I switched back to vanilla Debian after I got sick of the Ubuntu upgrade process). I think I even still have some small foil Ubuntu case stickers somewhere.

It's a very friendly distro, if you're an old-school hacker type you might find it a bit too packaged.  But it's very reliable compared to Windows, and did I mention it's friendly?  I've had my now 91 years old Dad running it for a few years, and I get very few tech support calls from him about that.
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Randy Pence on May 14, 2021, 09:23:13 am
Is Ubuntu still a decent distro? I was using it a lot up until about a decade ago (when I switched back to vanilla Debian after I got sick of the Ubuntu upgrade process). I think I even still have some small foil Ubuntu case stickers somewhere.

-Russ

It makes for some headaches, but I like it. I started out with ubuntu with 12.04 or so. Have tried out a few other distros, and even experimented with opensuse, but kept coming back to ubuntu because it is easier to get things working in it. There are so many more ubuntu users, so troubleshooting is more comprehensive, which I unfortunately still need here and there. My personal computer is a 9 year old ivy-bridge 8gb laptop, which runs absolutely fine, although could benefit from a solid state hard drive.

It wasn't until I upgraded to 20.04 that I was able to use open sound meter, as the previous long term support release simply didn't have the all the support packages up to date. I'm not a fan of the between lts release and would like it if ubuntu could be more up to date without bleeding edge instability. My next personal computer purchase might be one of the new mac books, who knows. I don't like windows, but that's what I use for work.
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Bob Faulkner on May 14, 2021, 10:07:16 am
Same as you, Ubuntu 20.04.  The only weird thing is that with my Roland Rubix-44 interface inputs 1 and 2 are showing up in Open Sound Meter as 3 and 4.  Otherwise it seems to work fine and give the same results as SMAART.
Interesting... good to know.

Is Ubuntu still a decent distro? I was using it a lot up until about a decade ago (when I switched back to vanilla Debian after I got sick of the Ubuntu upgrade process). I think I even still have some small foil Ubuntu case stickers somewhere.

-Russ
As mentioned before, yes it's a very decent distro.  It has come a long way from many years ago.  It's strength is in its GUI, very powerful, great display, multi-desktops, multi-user.  It's an easy replacement for Windows (especially for those who have only used Windows).  Big difference is the level of security with Linux.

I'm a UNIX person (now retired from the industry) and observed RedHat and CentOS to follow many of the industry standards of the *NIX world.  Ubuntu doesn't follow the same standards, but is still a manageable OS (from an engineering perspective).

Many years ago, Meyer had MAPP XT for Linux, which I used religiously, but then (many years ago as well), they stopped producing the software for Linux (it was a sad day).  It's good to see other alternatives for Linux.
Title: Re: List of not the usual suspects in audio analysis software
Post by: Russell Ault on May 15, 2021, 01:18:45 am
{...} With CentOS no longer supported I may be making the Debian swing this year.  The earth may stop rotating if Skyking runs from Redhat (you have to know some of the history of our FreePBX/Asterisk project for that to make sense).

Come on in, the water's fine. :D I played around with CentOS a bit for hosting some OpenVZ containers; it was just different enough from Debian to be annoying, but I muddled through. There's probably even less of a difference today now that systemd has taken over basically everything. The biggest selling point of Debian for me is the major-version upgrade process (vs. Ubuntu, anyway; never got far enough with CentOS to need to), which typically involves little more than changing one text file and then running the usual software upgrade commands. Then again, all of my machines (virtual or otherwise) are definitely in the "pets" camp, so my opinion might not be as valuable to you.

{...} Many years ago, Meyer had MAPP XT for Linux, which I used religiously, but then (many years ago as well), they stopped producing the software for Linux (it was a sad day).  It's good to see other alternatives for Linux.

Isn't MAPP XT just a Java applet with a wrapper? I always assumed that getting the Mac release unpackaged and running on a Linux machine wouldn't be too too difficult (although admittedly I've never tried it; my production laptop runs Windows because of Smaart).

-Russ