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 1 
 on: Yesterday at 11:23:47 PM 
Started by Dustin Campbell - Last post by Tim McCulloch
Doctor of wattage? Is that a service center?


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No, it's a euphemism for "it needs a tech."

Audio Labs of Georgia might be able to help.  They service a lot of Harman/Crown/JBL products.

I recall my old shop had an SRX828 not want to power up, IIRC it was the IEC power cable failing inside the molded part.  You might try a different power cord if you've not done so already.  If it's still in warranty, call JBL.  If it's out, call Audio Labs of GA.

 2 
 on: Yesterday at 08:22:53 PM 
Started by Dustin Campbell - Last post by Dustin Campbell
If it doesn't power up in the shop/at home, the amp bucket needs to see the Doctor of Wattage...
Doctor of wattage? Is that a service center?


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 3 
 on: Yesterday at 08:22:34 PM 
Started by Dustin Campbell - Last post by Dustin Campbell
If it doesn't power up in the shop/at home, the amp bucket needs to see the Doctor of Wattage...
Doctor of wattage? Is that a service center?


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 4 
 on: Yesterday at 08:16:36 PM 
Started by Dustin Campbell - Last post by Tim McCulloch
Thanks Brian - point taken - any known fixes or things I can check in the meantime time?


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If it doesn't power up in the shop/at home, the amp bucket needs to see the Doctor of Wattage...

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 08:08:56 PM 
Started by Dustin Campbell - Last post by Dustin Campbell
Long cable runs = voltage drop.  If voltage gets too low, the speaker won't run. But if you end up right at the very edge, it can put extra strain on the power supply that's trying to compensate.  Sometimes you'll blow a fuse, but sometimes you blow the power supply before the fuse. (rare, but I've seen it happen)

If you have the option to run on 240v, that's a much better solution, as the working range of the amp is 100-240v. Not only do you draw less current on the extension cord, any voltage drop will keep you well within a safe range of the power supply.
Thanks Brian - point taken - any known fixes or things I can check in the meantime time?


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 6 
 on: Yesterday at 08:04:34 PM 
Started by Jeremy Young - Last post by Jeremy Young
OK but can't you get just regular instrument belt packs? It would simplify matters
 Balanced doesn't matter when there is only a 12" cable between devices, but every reciever I have ever seen has 1/4" TS or TRS outputs so I'm not sure why this would be necessary.
 This is why I suggested using a regular mono instrument body pack. everything common on the + and - of a balanced input gets cancelled.. that applies to a dual mono signal. So regardless what kind of output the transmitter produces it should get an unbalanced mono input.
 Yes... but leave it disconnected at both ends or IOW.. use an unbalanced cable.

Wait... what? Oh no... you can't put a wireless reciever and a transmitter right next to one another.. that is an instant feedback loop. And that doesn't even get into the latency and signal degradation you will be introducing by daisy chaining multiple wireless system one after the other. This is not going to work.


I think you have it backwards in your head. 


See my other reply, I'm using IEM's not wireless microphones.  The battery powered belt pack will be the audio source for the speaker.  I have no intent to put RX and TX anywhere near each other, I'm just replacing 80-90' of XLR cable with this as it crosses a street, then going back to balanced cables down that street (250 to 400 feet of distance depending which street) before another TX shows up to jump over another street. 

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 08:01:07 PM 
Started by Jeremy Young - Last post by Jeremy Young
You need signal across pin 2 and 3 for a balanced signal. Optionally, you can tie pin 3 to ground.  If you use pin 1 and 2, you'll get a lower level.

You can pick just left or just right and it would be fine if you're sending a mono signal.  No need to mess with summing them.

Alternatively, get a 1/8 to dual 1/4 inch connector and run the thing through a DI. No need to mess around creating custom adaptors then.

6 wireless hops may start to get noisy by the end of the line, but if you pay attention to your gain structure, it'll probably be just fine.


For clarification, I won't have a balanced signal coming out of the beltpack. 


The signal source for the powered speaker or amplifier will be a stereo 1/8" TRS connector on the receiver (belt pack) of a Sennheiser IEM kit. 


The transmitter (typically rack mounted) will be receiving a balancing signal from a mixer, but only mono. 


I'm trying to ensure that the cable I make will take the mono signal from the TRS jack and give me an unbalanced mono input to the input of the powered speaker or amplifier, while retaining the benefit of the "antenna" function of the cable itself for better RF performance.


I don't want to sum anything, no need to.  I probably confused matters with explaining what I know I don't want to do. 


1/8" connector to dual 1/4" patched into a DI with an XLR from teh DI to the speaker sounds like the mess I'm trying to avoid hanging in view on a tripod.  I want the belt pack on top of the speaker with a battery inside it, and a single cable from the headphone jack to the input on the speaker, which should be entirely possible.


Noise... yeah that's the goal.  The volume expectations are low at the furthest section of street from the performance area and there's lots of road noise / wind noise / ocean traffic noise at that point anyway.  Check my other thread mid August for the reality check update from me after the event.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 07:56:36 PM 
Started by Debbie Dunkley - Last post by Tim McCulloch
Hey Brian, I have Crown Itech HDs and have never had an issue using them with my spider box's GFCI outlets, but I was also made of this issue years ago. I read this thread awhile back to confirm and learn more: https://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,172049.10.html

Now that Crown is aware, I see that you said they suggested doing a ground lift. How did/do you actually accomplish that? And how is this done safely? Any insight here would be greatly appreciated.

With the little plastic "grounded outlet adapter" that used to sell for 99 cents each.

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 07:51:19 PM 
Started by Spenser Hamilton - Last post by Tim McCulloch
B&H has them in stock.

I didn't check Beards and Hats the other day, but the other usual suspects didn't have them listed yet.  Apparently the product went live the next day.

Getting mixed reviews from the Yoo Toob recording people.

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 07:44:02 PM 
Started by Jeremy Young - Last post by Paul G. OBrien
I'm using Sennheiser IEM G4 wireless packs to avoid cable runs across streets
OK but can't you get just regular instrument belt packs? It would simplify matters

I intend to make up some cables with 1/8" TRS jacks at one end and XLRM on the other so I can connect the IEM receiver directly to a power amp or powered speaker.  I know it won't be balanced and that's fine.
Balanced doesn't matter when there is only a 12" cable between devices, but every reciever I have ever seen has 1/4" TS or TRS outputs so I'm not sure why this would be necessary.

I'll take a line level, mono balanced audio signal from a mixer and send it to the transmitter.  I'll set the mode to "mono" on the transmitter and per the manual, set the receiver to "focus" mode which should then give me just a mono signal, but presumably the same polarity to each "ear" unlike a conventional balanced mono connector where one is out of polarity. 


On the pin-out diagram for the belt pack, it shows the 1/8" TRS jack being:
Tip: L
Ring: R
Sleeve: Ground


XLR balanced connectors are typically:
1: Common
2: Signal +
3: Signal -


If the source wasn't stereo, I know I'd make a balanced connector from TRS to XLR with Pin 1 (ground/common) going to the sleeve, Pin 2 (signal +) going to tip, Pin 3 (Signal -) going to the ring, but again that's not what I'm trying to make.  In this case, Stereo probably isn't the correct terminology since the content is mono but I mean having identical signals, rather than a polarity inversion.
This is why I suggested using a regular mono instrument body pack. everything common on the + and - of a balanced input gets cancelled.. that applies to a dual mono signal. So regardless what kind of output the transmitter produces it should get an unbalanced mono input.

Here's my guess:
Pin 1 to Sleeve
Pin 2 to Tip
Pin 3 not connected to anything, 
Yes... but leave it disconnected at both ends or IOW.. use an unbalanced cable.


Bonus answer for any tips on mounting of IEM transmitters on top of powered speakers.
Wait... what? Oh no... you can't put a wireless reciever and a transmitter right next to one another.. that is an instant feedback loop. And that doesn't even get into the latency and signal degradation you will be introducing by daisy chaining multiple wireless system one after the other. This is not going to work.

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