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Author Topic: rewiring lab drivers in series  (Read 3185 times)

Scott Deeter

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Re: Air influenced impedance
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2007, 05:38:23 pm »

Mac Kerr wrote on Fri, 09 November 2007 17:33

Scott Deeter wrote on Fri, 09 November 2007 17:21

Al Limberg wrote on Fri, 09 November 2007 15:05

Just to make it more fun, the impedance also changes depending on how many Labs you have and how you set them up.  Four of them in a 2x2 array will show a small increase in impedance (per cabinet) compared to a single cab  or two Labs paired due to the larger mouth area of the combined cabs.
Al,
I'm not doubting you, but I just want to make sure I understand what your saying here. Basically your saying the impedance of each individual cabs driver impedance will increase by just putting the "individual cabs" together Confused ...correct?
Yes. when you group multiples together it changes how the horn interacts with the air, the acoustic impedance, which changes how the horn interacts with the driver, which changes the electrical impedance.

Mac



Thanks Mac. Horns are of a different animal of course. Confused
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Take care,
Scott Deeter

Al Limberg

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Re: Air influenced impedance
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2007, 07:08:50 pm »

That old PV cabinet crossed my mind when typing.  I scratched my head for a few days over that one back in the day.

?;o)
Al
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If the automobile had followed the same development cycle as the computer, a Rolls-Royce would today cost $100, get one million miles to the gallon, and explode once a year killing everyone inside - Robert X. Cringely

Ivan Beaver

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Re: Air influenced impedance=Experiment
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2007, 10:14:23 pm »

A fun thing to do is to hook up an impedance meter to a horn driver that is not attached to a horn, and facing up into the air.

Now choose a particular freq within its operating band and move your hands around over the exit.  Form a "horn" with your hands and place your hand over the exit.  

Watch the impedance change.  That gives an idea of how much of an influence the actual horn has over the reflected impedance at the terminals of the driver.

You can also do impedance sweeps  for a full bandwidth idea of what is happening.
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For every complicated question-there is a simple- easy to understand WRONG answer.

Can I have some more talent in the monitors--PLEASE?

Ivan Beaver
dB Audio & Video Inc.
Danley Sound Labs
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