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Author Topic: DRUM SOLUTIONS  (Read 2686 times)

Wade Davis

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DRUM SOLUTIONS
« on: December 25, 2004, 03:59:45 PM »

OTHER THAN PLEXI SHIELDS AND ISO-PANELS WHAT HELPS TAME DRUMS?WILL PLACING THE KIT ON A RISER HELP? WHO IS USING COMPS & GATES OR ARE THEY A WASTE OF MONEY UNLESS THEY ARE IN THE KILO BUCK CLASS? SHOULD I MIC EVERY SURFACE IF I INTEND TO RECORD THE PRAISE TEAM FOR A LOCAL CABLE TV(WE INTEND TO NLE)?I KNOW THESE ARE ALOT OF QUESTIONS BUT I'M FIGURING BUDGETS! THANX A MILLION!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Tom Young

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Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2004, 11:27:43 AM »

You have 2 methods available to "tame" loud drummers:

1)  acoustic barriers, which really only work well when they absorb as much or more than they reflect acoustic energy.  This entails having lower barriers designed to absorb, carpet below the kit and absorption behind the kit..... plus plexi where needed.  The more you break up the plexi panels (while filling the openings that these create) the more the sound is broken up into "smaller" reflections.

2) get the drummer to play softer or switch him to special "low noise" sticks.  

I won't include electronic drums because this entails a whole other set of problems, as well as a potential to succeed, but it seldom works as a long term solution.

My experience is that if the drummer is a volume problem, in most cases no matter what you do will not work.  It IS attitude more than anything else.

Perhaps in your case (where you are recording) he will cooperate more than usual and the gobo thing will work.
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Mike Sveda

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Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2004, 12:07:21 PM »

We use a custom made shield consisting of aluminum frames with plexi panels. Clearsonics absorption panels along the bottom and clearsonics roof panels.  Our floor is carpet over concrete. wWe found that a riser created resonances inside the drum cage that bothered the drummer.  Muche better on the floor. we have the roof open on the front to let it breathe in there.
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Bennett Prescott

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Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2004, 12:44:08 PM »

mediawade wrote on Sat, 25 December 2004 15:59

OTHER THAN PLEXI SHIELDS AND ISO-PANELS WHAT HELPS TAME DRUMS?WILL PLACING THE KIT ON A RISER HELP? WHO IS USING COMPS & GATES OR ARE THEY A WASTE OF MONEY UNLESS THEY ARE IN THE KILO BUCK CLASS? SHOULD I MIC EVERY SURFACE IF I INTEND TO RECORD THE PRAISE TEAM FOR A LOCAL CABLE TV(WE INTEND TO NLE)?I KNOW THESE ARE ALOT OF QUESTIONS BUT I'M FIGURING BUDGETS! THANX A MILLION!!!!!!!!!!!!!



Since you're a newbie, I'll assume you don't know. Typing in all caps is like yelling. Screaming at the forum and asking for replies is a little agressive. Just how the 'net works. Furthermore, it makes your post a little overwhelming and difficult to read, reducing the likelihood that you'll get as many useful responses as you otherwise might.
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-- Bennett Prescott
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Bennett Prescott

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Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2004, 12:46:44 PM »

Comps and gates, of course, have everything to do with FOH sound and nothing to do with reducing drum volumes on stage.

For media feeds, I'd keep it to a pair of overheads and maybe kick & snare mics. Listen to it on headphones.
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-- Bennett Prescott
Campus PA
148 9th Street
Troy, NY 12180
(518) 488-7190
http://www.campuspa.com

Wade Davis

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Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2004, 09:06:41 PM »

Thanks for the info. I will sit down with our drummer and show him all of these responses. Sorry about the caps.... I'm the media rah rah guy but no one likes yelling. Please forgive the oversight.
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Mark Allen

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Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2004, 02:27:47 PM »

I know you've received several well qualified and informative replies here, but I came accross a solution, quite by accident, a while back that may help.

When you really break it down, I think you'll find that the entire drum kit really isn't the problem.  For the most part, the kick and snare are really the 'culprits'.  This is simply because of their place in the music mix - they're hit the most!  When my church switched back to real drums from the V-Drums we had been using we used a nice 4' plexi surround with the lower 2' being lined with 4" foam rubber. In our situation, there's a bannister directly in front of the drum kit - so that the plexi fits between the kit and the bannister.  When I mic'd up the kick, I found a spot where it sounded good, then we shoved the front head hard up against the foam rubber next to the plexi!  The results are VERY good!  The acoustic energy of the kick is substantiallyreduced in the room = very controllable!  However, the drummer still has plenty of energy coming back to him, so he's satisfied.  Of course, this requires that the foam rubber is physically stabilized enough to support the pressure against it - and plexi surrounds aren't normally very stable on their own.  In our case, the bannister gives us the physical stability we need.

If you can make it work though, it very effective! (still looking for a way to deal with the snare though,,,,,)
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"Those who hear not the music think the dancer is mad." - anonymous

James Lawford

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Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2004, 12:21:32 PM »

As you will see from my post below, We've just installed some clearsonic panels at our church. We have the seven panel 5.5ft high set, and they work very well. Gives us a lot more control FOH for our mixers. They do need absorption below (carpet) and behind (we have a curtain) as the panels only reflect, they do not absorp.

James Lawford
Birmingham Christian Centre UK
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James Lawford -Birmingham England

Rob Warren

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Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2004, 10:54:27 PM »

Nothing will work as good as convincing the drummer to play softer.  This usually does not go over real well.  But sometimes you get lucky.  Once you have dealt with drummers that play any beat any speed and dynamically can turn their volume up and down like a radio then I no longer buy this malarky about how it can't be done.  It's just a lack of effort on the drummers part to learn how to play steady and soft as well as steady and loud.  Also as has been said a smaller stick helps.  But like I said, it doesn't go over well very much.  

You were asking about drum micing.

One thing is the type of drum sound you wish to achieve.  
If you are after the in your face rock-n-roll processed drum sound then you will need to close mic the drums individually and use comps/gates plus reverb.  
  If you are after a more natural drum sound then I like a mic on the kick a mic on the snare and 2 overheads.  I can hear everything they do and the balance is nice.  Obviously budget is usually an issue but depending on the style you don't want to buy stuff you don't need.  
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Rob

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: DRUM SOLUTIONS
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2004, 10:54:27 PM »


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