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Author Topic: Amplifier supplied power-cords  (Read 4425 times)

Geoff Doane

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Re: Amplifier supplied power-cords
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2011, 09:46:35 am »

This issue is at the BOTTOM of my worries list.  At or near the top of my "non-issue" list.
However I wish I had a dollar for everytime I've had trouble w/ an IEC cord coming loose in the back of a rack. I would like to meet the guy who invented the IEC cord so I can kick him in the butt hard enough to lift his heels a couple inches off the ground for all the extra trouble and headache. GREAT now a regular extension cord won't work AND they come loose alot. Nothing like constant improvement. THANX butthead!
Exactly how these became "de riguer" is a miracle of idiocy I frankly do not understand. (end rant)
Chuck

We've been down this road before on the old forum.  Apparently, in order to meet safety regulations, if the line cord is permanently attached, it has to support the weight of the amp without pulling out, OR you can make it detach without breaking anything, hence the IEC connector.  QSC (and more recently EV) has started using locking IECs on their equipment (I suspect they will part without damage if you apply enough force).

As for wire gauge, get out a resistance chart, and do a comparison.  An 18 inch, 18 ga. IEC cord has less resistance than a 4 ft., 14 ga. cord.  And it's the resistance that counts.  My amps are older, and don't have the locking IECs, so a ty-rap to the rear rack ear keeps the cords secure.

GTD
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George Dougherty

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Re: Amplifier supplied power-cords
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2011, 11:31:31 am »

This issue is at the BOTTOM of my worries list.  At or near the top of my "non-issue" list.
However I wish I had a dollar for everytime I've had trouble w/ an IEC cord coming loose in the back of a rack. I would like to meet the guy who invented the IEC cord so I can kick him in the butt hard enough to lift his heels a couple inches off the ground for all the extra trouble and headache. GREAT now a regular extension cord won't work AND they come loose alot. Nothing like constant improvement. THANX butthead!
Exactly how these became "de riguer" is a miracle of idiocy I frankly do not understand. (end rant)
Chuck

Had the same annoyance so I made mine friction fit.  A narrow section of gaffer's tape just wide enough to cover the length of the IEC connector that fits into the socket and wrapped enough times around that it takes a bit of effort to get the plug into the socket did the trick.  My amp rack now goes anywhere without a need to reseat the cords at each stop.  The friction fit is tight enough to keep it in place, but still allows for removal when necessary.  The tape will compress a bit over time with repeated use so I do need to add another small section to a monitor amp that gets occasionally unracked for small gigs, but that's a quick fix.
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Bob Leonard

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Re: Amplifier supplied power-cords
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2011, 09:08:28 am »

We've been down this road before on the old forum.  Apparently, in order to meet safety regulations, if the line cord is permanently attached, it has to support the weight of the amp without pulling out, OR you can make it detach without breaking anything, hence the IEC connector.  QSC (and more recently EV) has started using locking IECs on their equipment (I suspect they will part without damage if you apply enough force).

As for wire gauge, get out a resistance chart, and do a comparison.  An 18 inch, 18 ga. IEC cord has less resistance than a 4 ft., 14 ga. cord.  And it's the resistance that counts.  My amps are older, and don't have the locking IECs, so a ty-rap to the rear rack ear keeps the cords secure.

GTD

Correct on all counts.
 
If you buy an amp and it comes with the cord it will have to be UL approved in this country. I have never found a need to do anything more than to neatly tuck the access into the rack, out of the way beside the amp. Everything else to me is a waste of my time and money.  ;)
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Re: Amplifier supplied power-cords
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2011, 09:08:28 am »


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