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Author Topic: Vocals in separate PA  (Read 31836 times)

Scott MacAuley

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Re: Vocals in separate PA
« Reply #110 on: March 31, 2008, 07:30:34 pm »

n the vocals in a sep PA
I'm still using this setup every weekend. It's a very satisfying feeling to see the look on the competition's faces. Especially after they've spent 20 grand or more on their system and insist mine must be a piece of crap. Whell it is, but finely tuned!.
I have found that when placing the stacks side by side it is better to have the vocals only in their own stack. When stacking the vocal cabs on top (preferred)I can put vocals in both without any issues.
Some of the patrons at one club I work apparently ask if I am there running sound before they pay to get in. Interesting.

On the back wall PA.
For my own band, we use a lot of electronics. I use analog modeling guitar rigs, electric drums, and a modeling bass rig.
We're using side located floor monitors but I've been toying with the idea of a multi feed backline PA and timing the mains to that. The problem is stage depth in small clubs. How would you time A diagonally placed speaker stack to the mains?
Roughly the center of the stack to the front of the mains perhaps?
 
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Grant Conklin

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Re: Vocals in separate PA
« Reply #111 on: March 31, 2008, 10:03:56 pm »

Scott MacAuley wrote on Mon, 31 March 2008 18:30


...the idea of a multi feed backline PA and timing the mains to that. The problem is stage depth in small clubs. How would you time A diagonally placed speaker stack to the mains?
Roughly the center of the stack to the front of the mains perhaps?
 



As with any delay, it's an average for the audience.  Another labster (chime in if you wish) recently told me of a simple way to align subs, and it should work for delays as well:  
Feed a signal tone to both sets of speakers. (in the case of a subwoofer, use the crossover frequency)  Flip the phase on the speaker you wish to delay, and then adjust the delay until the sound is weakest.  Flip the phase back, and you should be good to go, at least time-wise.  You might experiment with different frequencies, or perhaps some noise.  

Thanks,
Grant
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Scott MacAuley

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Re: Vocals in separate PA
« Reply #112 on: April 01, 2008, 08:17:00 am »

Since we're on this subject again, probably for good reason,
Here's a trick I use ALOT!. This is for those walk in gigs where you are using a house system or if you don't have other boxes.
Since you are probably stuck with a standard 3 way PA you don't have aux fed subs or exciters. You certainly don't want to rewire
the house pa, but plenty of guys try! BAD IDEA.

Whip up a little rack with a 2 way or 3way analog crossover and whatever other toys you might need. Usually compressors or your favorite FX. Make sure you have both patch insert cables and regular lines for it.

Patch the crossover into the submaster insert, or the submaster out and re enter it into either a return or spare input. Cut the lows around 100 or so for normal mortals. That is now your vocal master channel. You can cut the highs as well (with a 3 way) to solve some 8k and up issues. This way you do not have to kill the lows with limited eq and you can even toss a compressor for safety and smoothness after the crossover.  Send all the vocals to that submaster, not the mains and then send the processed vocals to the mains. In really bad limited cases you can at least insert the crossover/comp into the lead vocal channel. That's where a stereo crossover is handy as you could handle two vocals if you have to. Works like a champ. Allows those crazy singers that like to cruise the audience (like me), freedom, and you sanity. If you are really really limited the behringer 4 ch active DI has balanced inputs and could probably be used as a
mic pre that would not be noiser than most cheap boards today.
You could then send up to 4 vocal mics to your handirack from the snake and then into a house mixer that doesn't have submasters or inserts. A 4 ch mic pre would be better.
You might get too much walk in work though. Smile

I hope this helps somebody else's headaches too.
Cheers
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