ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: DBX 1231 EQ  (Read 5454 times)

Joe Long

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 18
DBX 1231 EQ
« on: February 22, 2011, 12:10:28 am »

Hey, was just wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of some useful infor regarding EQ and what not.

We just received a DBX 1231 Equalizer for free from a local musician who runs a music store.

Was hoping someone could help in regards to perhaps setting it, understanding an EQ and what it does ect...

Also i've heard that this should probably be done professionally?

thanks
Logged

Arnold B. Krueger

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 167
Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2011, 07:44:46 am »

Hey, was just wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of some useful infor regarding EQ and what not.

We just received a DBX 1231 Equalizer for free from a local musician who runs a music store.

Was hoping someone could help in regards to perhaps setting it, understanding an EQ and what it does ect...

Also i've heard that this should probably be done professionally?

Knowing how to take advantage of an equalizer is an important skill for people working in live sound and recording to have.  In an ideal world we'd run you through no less than a full-day  class with theory and a hands-on lab where you would learn  how to use it.

If you want to use it to improve the over-all performance of your sound system, then the fastest way to obtain that result is to hire a professional to set it up as the main equalizer in your system. Better sound and a reduction in the tendency towards feedback would be expected results.

Of course this leaves you with no new skills.

If you hook the equilizer up between your digital music player and your mixing board, and work with it to make good recordings sound *right* in your room, you would start to get the benefits of the learning.  I googled on "how to use an equalizer" and came up with a number of articles that seemed to be good starting points.

Logged

chuck clark

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 348
Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2011, 01:23:24 pm »

Hi Joe, how about selling it -to ME!? Ha!

Beginners can put a big smile on their EQ to make average speakers sound more like Turbos!
Average users can hack the curve to bits trying to get rid of feedback!
Proficient users after spending hours and hours listening to what the EQ does to many different instruments and
voices can make "tweaks" that can turn average sound into GREAT sound!
Put on some head phones, insert the EQ on your playback channels and PFL them. Commence playing until you have a good idea what the different frequency's sound like. THEN insert the EQ on your mains or monitors and play with the EQ live and be ready to reduce gain incase of feedback if there are any live mics on!
Let the Ear training begin. (OR hire a pro)
Happy sailing!
Chuck
PS: Engineers can also "equalize" a set of speakers placed in an acoustic "space" to have that same "flat" frequency response they measured in an anechoic chamber. (which is what the original Eq's were invented for)
Logged

Brian Ehlers

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 126
  • West Michigan
Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2011, 01:34:53 pm »

I'll add a couple comments:

1/  In general, EQs should be used to cut, not boost, certain frequencies.  Any boost you do use should typically be less than 3 dB.  In particular, don't boost the frequency bands near either end, bass or treble.  If you find yourself wanting to do this, it's probably because your loudspeakers are not capable of producing those frequencies.  Giving them a boost will distort the sound at best, damage equipment at worst.

2/  Using prerecorded music (CD, etc) to dial in the EQ is a good suggestion, but don't fall in love with the settings you end up with.  At the end of the day, your PA system is amplifying live sound from microphones, right?  There will always be interaction between the speakers and the mics.  You may need to further adjust the EQ to make those mics sound natural (though much of this is ideally done using the individual channel EQ on your mixing board).
Logged

Mike Spitzer

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 52
Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2011, 01:41:20 pm »

This is a tough one. Like the others were, saying, it would be a good idea to get a pro in there; especially one who'll show you what he's doing. Other than that, here are a few tips.

1. Some (most?) people use EQ to boost what they like. I use it to cut what I don't, especially feedback-problem areas.

2. If you have a pink noise generator, you can use it to find feedback problems when boosting the EQ. It's probably a good idea to start by finding those areas and pulling them down. Work from there.

3. Get some music you're very familiar with and play that. Get a nice mix of songs with a lot of bass and a lot of high end. That'll help you tweak.

4. In my opinion, concentrate on the vocals. Since this is a church, the focus should be on the worship leader and his/her vocals. This isn't a concert.

Other than that, good luck. This is a tough one to handle through forums. You may also check with other churches in the area with a good media team. I'll often visit other churches and help out a bit if they need it and not charge anything. Some of them have some really good resources that might be willing to offer you a good bit of help.

Edit: What Brian said. =)

-mS
Logged

Joe Long

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 18
Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2011, 07:30:34 pm »

Thanks for the replys. Now I have a little better understanding about what we're getting into. Thanks again.
Logged

Joe Long

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 18
Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2011, 02:33:27 am »

Also, have another question

When you mention "professional" why would they be any different?

are they using tools, or just their ears?  Is it possible for myself to set it?

Logged

Arnold B. Krueger

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 167
Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #7 on: February 23, 2011, 10:48:50 am »

Also, have another question

When you mention "professional" why would they be any different?

are they using tools, or just their ears?  Is it possible for myself to set it?

The line between really good working volunteers and people who ear their living doing live sound is blurred. When skilled  people set up eqs the tools they use vary with the application. I wouldn't (and haven't) hesiated to do measurements while setting up the equalizer for my main speakers. Using an Eq makes far, far less sense when I'm fine tuning the electric bass channel to get *that sound* that the WD wants to hear.

FWIW the equalization of my main speakers at church is a two-stage affair. I use a graphic eq in the amp stack eq to obtain flat, smooth response over a range of seats near the middle of the room, mostly based on measuremnts. I use the parametrics on the output channels to apply the room curve and make other subjective adjustments. 

The primary and most-adjusted means of equalization is via the parametric eqs on the input channels. This is *always* done by ear and gets changed at least a little every service. 

For example, the channel eq for drums and bass changes depending who sits in those chairs  for that service.  A different person playing the same instrument makes that much of a difference.
Logged

g'bye, Dick Rees

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7424
  • Duluth
Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2011, 10:16:15 am »

people who ear their living doing live sound

That's how I do it...... ;D
Logged
Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain...

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: DBX 1231 EQ
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2011, 10:16:15 am »


Pages: [1]   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.035 seconds with 24 queries.