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Author Topic: Your favorite warning labels  (Read 10039 times)

ThomasDameron

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #40 on: February 23, 2007, 12:08:01 pm »

And the big picture:

index.php/fa/8092/0/
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Scott Raymond

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #41 on: February 23, 2007, 12:39:19 pm »

Yes, nice floating guard on the PTO but no guards on the u-joints and open shafts, flat belts and the tire, let alone the saw.  Lots of things to catch loose clothing or hair.  Of course it's safe if everyone has the sense to stay well away from the moving parts when in operation.  OSHA would have a hay-day however!

Is this a small commericial or personal mill or a working museum?  Slick job of adapting to the old flat belt main drive!

P.S.  I know a guy here that has numerous vintage engines that could power that mill.
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Eric Snodgrass

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #42 on: February 23, 2007, 12:50:42 pm »

Scott Raymond (Scott R) wrote on Fri, 23 February 2007 09:39

Yes, nice floating guard on the PTO but no guards on the u-joints and open shafts, flat belts and the tire, let alone the saw.  Lots of things to catch loose clothing or hair.  Of course it's safe if everyone has the sense to stay well away from the moving parts when in operation.  OSHA would have a hay-day however!

Is this a small commericial or personal mill or a working museum?  Slick job of adapting to the old flat belt main drive!

P.S.  I know a guy here that has numerous vintage engines that could power that mill.
pssst... Scott, your farmer is showing.
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Eric Snodgrass
No, really, I do this for a living.

Scott Raymond

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #43 on: February 24, 2007, 08:16:01 am »


Oops, Wrong hat.  Actually, there can be a lot of noise involved in both of them.  Evil or Very Mad   And I have tried micing a musical saw, just not one that big.  Shocked  Right now working on taxes for both I really wish the "Paperwork Reduction Act" actually meant something.   Rolling Eyes
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Mike Butler (media)

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #44 on: February 24, 2007, 04:14:32 pm »

Scott Raymond (Scott R) wrote on Fri, 23 February 2007 12:39

Yes, nice floating guard on the PTO but no guards on the u-joints and open shafts, flat belts and the tire, let alone the saw.  Lots of things to catch loose clothing or hair.  Of course it's safe if everyone has the sense to stay well away from the moving parts when in operation.  OSHA would have a hay-day however! ....

Is Connecticut far enough away?  Very Happy

We sometimes run across "guard-free" configs like this in the countryside of New England. My first instinct is to RUN LIKE HELL! Shocked
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<a href="http://www.mikebutlermedia.com" target="_blank">http://www.mikebutlermedia.com</a>

Mike Butler Media * AV/video production * corporate event production * presentation services * marketing support * creative research * graphic design * photography

ThomasDameron

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #45 on: February 24, 2007, 09:07:05 pm »

Scott,

I don't know much about it really.  It's a museum piece, but just sitting around at an Rv campground where I did a festival.  There were a couple of other pieces that I don't remember well.  They seemed to be out of operation completely, but the fresh sawdust on this one made it seem like still got some use.  All I know is the term "fearfully respectful" comes to mind.

thomas d.
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Tom Danley

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #46 on: February 24, 2007, 10:32:28 pm »

Oh yeah “"fearfully respectful", that’s good,  that old time stuff was before osha haha.
Safe as long as you never take your mind or eyes off what your doing.

Those flat belts had a nasty habit in that the cleats that held the sections together would often fail an leave something like the end of a big staple, shaped like a hook, whizzing along the belts travel. These could snag your shirt or you if you weren’t careful..
I’ve got  a big old engine that powered flat belts once and is full of safety features too, kind of like a big open knife switch. (below)

It’s a dainty 6600 Lbs for the engine, 48 inch dia 7 inch wide flywheels, an 8 by 12 bore and stroke and a whopping 15 HP at 350 RPM.
Having been made in 1919, Its slightly hard to start by “modern terms” but you can do it (just like moving it around I suppose).
It starts by filling the injection pump reservoir with kerosene to make starting easier than on diesel and filling the blow torch..  
Once filled, one starts a fire in the kerosene blow torch which heats up the torch body and you pump up the air supply.
This only takes a few min or so.    Once the torch is blasting, you heat the ignition “glow plug” in the cylinder head with the up firing  torch for 45 min or so.
This is a good time to feed mosquitoes while you anxiously monitor the roaring flame and keep the torch pumped up with air.
When you can see part of the head is red hot, it is time to go.
You climb up on top of the engine and give the oiler 50 fast turns of the crank to send oil everywhere and then lower the torch setting.
Having a dry crankcase, most of the used oil eventually drips out into a “drool bucket” below with the blackest filthy oil you can imagine.
You, open the compression release and rotate the flywheels back 2/3 from top dead center. You close the compression release, grab the injection pump handle and give it a squirt, then and this is the fun part, you step up on a wheel spoke, grab a flywheel spoke high up and hang off of it to get it going as fast as you can.  When it comes up on compression, if everything is right, it stops with sort of a clunk and then reverses direction and then goes CHUUF out the 5 inch pipe with a modest cloud of grey smoke.  If your lucky, it fires again next time around and picks up speed and your home free.
Oh, yeah, you have to let go of the flywheel and do not intersect it or other bitd while rotating.
I like to set it to run about 90 Rpm, it has a nice thump thump thump along with a bunch of mechanical noises. To hear a bunch of old engines running is sort of like music.
Best,

Tom Danley

Somewhere on 35mm slides I have some warning signs from White Sands that were humorous.
One picture I took was a Black Brandt rocket booster on a 4 wheel trailer, halfway pointed out a big set of open doors towards the desert, with a sign that said “No Smoking”. The perfect Bart Simpson moment.
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Scott Raymond

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #47 on: February 26, 2007, 01:41:31 pm »

Mike Butler (media) wrote on Sat, 24 February 2007 15:14

Is Connecticut far enough away?  Smile


Oh definitely....Even if the saw blade breaks loose and rolls down road (as in the cartoons) I don't think it'll make it to you.  Laughing

Quote:


We sometimes run across "guard-free" configs like this in the countryside of New England. My first instinct is to RUN LIKE HELL! Shocked


Yup!  I'm not shrugging off safety, just a bit of frustration at some of the extremes companies have to go to in protecting us from ourselves because of lawsuits.  A lot of accidents are people taking shortcuts or getting in a hurry and not shutting off a machine first (or putting hot coffee between their legs  Rolling Eyes) .  I WOULD be "a bit" apprehensive  or fearfully respectful Shocked as Thomas says about working around a blade that size.  That sucker would have the ability to chuck a piece of wood quite a ways as well as relieve you of your body parts. Oh BTW, when you RUN don't trip or step in a hole.  Twisted Evil
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Scott Raymond

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #48 on: February 26, 2007, 02:08:21 pm »

Tom,

Nice pic.  Is Clare the engine or the child?  Twisted Evil  It is amazing how far technology has come in engines.  My neighbor here has a big Rumley Oil Pull as well as dozens and dozens of engines and old tractors.  I think what you call an AVID collector.  Smile
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Philip Roberts

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Re: Your favorite warning labels
« Reply #49 on: February 26, 2007, 03:07:53 pm »

Scott Raymond (Scott R) wrote on Mon, 26 February 2007 13:41

Quote:


We sometimes run across "guard-free" configs like this in the countryside of New England. My first instinct is to RUN LIKE HELL! Shocked


Yup!  I'm not shrugging off safety, just a bit of frustration at some of the extremes companies have to go to in protecting us from ourselves because of lawsuits.  A lot of accidents are people taking shortcuts or getting in a hurry and not shutting off a machine first (or putting hot coffee between their legs  Rolling Eyes) .  


Yes running guard free is very dangerous (in fact my grandfather lost use of one had by moving a running saw in the 1930's, not that having a hook hindering him much).

I will say however that the often cited hot coffee incident is often misunderstood. The facts of the case are that McDonald's kept their coffee much hotter than other restaurants (40-55 degrees hotter). Hot enough to cause third degree burns in seconds. If you don't know to expect coffee that hot . . . (see http://www.lectlaw.com/files/cur78.htm for more info)

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Philip Roberts
Director of Media Engineering
Pioneer Memorial Seventh Day Adventist Church
Berrien Springs MI
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