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Author Topic: Video math  (Read 3854 times)

Austin Parker

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Video math
« on: December 17, 2006, 02:11:40 pm »

Did a quick search in this section and cam up empty handed. Anyone have a good (online) reference for video mathematics?  
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Austin Parker

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Don Boone

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Re: Video math
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2006, 11:29:48 am »

I don't doubt that you came up empty searching for 'video math'.
What are you trying to calculate? Throw distance? Bandwidth? Cable loss? There's lot's of different things that could qualify as 'video math'.

Don
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Brad Weber

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Re: Video math
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2006, 02:09:19 pm »

Don is right and you may have to look to different sources depending on the specific information desired.  I find that video tends to fall into three general categories: production/recording, broadcast/transmission and display (projection, screens, flat panels, etc.).  Streaming/compression and related technologies could be a newer fourth area and where it applies film is probably even yet another area.  Many people work in one, two or even three of these areas but few work in all of them, so you often find that the related texts and information also tend to fall into these loose categories.  So if you want to know the amount of data recording an hour of MPEG-4 video takes you would likely find that information in a very different place than how to calculate screen size which would probably be different than where you might find how to calculate signal loss in a coax cable and so on.

For the AV world, Extron and Da-Lite both have some excellent resources available online.  You might also look at "The Basics of Audio and Visual Systems Design" book that InfoComm offers that gathers together information from a number of other resources.
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Brad Weber
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Austin Parker

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Re: Video math
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2006, 10:35:55 pm »

display and transmission (of the digital type)
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Austin Parker

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Mac Kerr

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Re: Video math
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2006, 10:48:16 pm »

Austin Parker wrote on Mon, 18 December 2006 22:35

display and transmission (of the digital type)
Oh! Now it's clear.

Mac
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Austin Parker

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Re: Video math
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2006, 08:16:39 pm »

Mac Kerr wrote on Mon, 18 December 2006 22:48

Austin Parker wrote on Mon, 18 December 2006 22:35

display and transmission (of the digital type)
Oh! Now it's clear.

Mac




Glad to see that the board still has its low level of sarcasm. Come on guys, im just looking for a few web pages to refer to. I don't think that needs a lot of description...  I'm looking for webpages that have math relating to display video and video transmission...
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Austin Parker

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"Are you with me? Do you get it? If you have to ask what "IT" is, you don't get it"

Mac Kerr

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Re: Video math
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2006, 08:37:29 pm »

Austin Parker wrote on Tue, 19 December 2006 20:16

Mac Kerr wrote on Mon, 18 December 2006 22:48

Austin Parker wrote on Mon, 18 December 2006 22:35

display and transmission (of the digital type)
Oh! Now it's clear.

Mac




Glad to see that the board still has its low level of sarcasm. Come on guys, im just looking for a few web pages to refer to. I don't think that needs a lot of description...  I'm looking for webpages that have math relating to display video and video transmission...
Maybe if you mentioned exactly what it is you are trying to find the formula for someone could help. Your total lack of information makes it impossible.

Mac
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Milt Hathaway

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Re: Video math
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2006, 11:23:18 pm »

Austin Parker wrote on Tue, 19 December 2006 19:16

Glad to see that the board still has its low level of sarcasm. Come on guys, im just looking for a few web pages to refer to. I don't think that needs a lot of description...  I'm looking for webpages that have math relating to display video and video transmission...


What "math"? Optical (zoom ratios and such)? Frequency related (cable bandwidth requirements, etc.)? Light related (color spectrum)?

I'm not being sarcastic.

Here's a link to some background and history related to basic NTSC video: http://www.ntsc-tv.com/

Beyond that, you'll have to define your area of research a bit more clearly.
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Brian K Tennyson, CTS-D

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Re: Video math
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2006, 12:23:51 pm »

Extron's Technology center is a good resource for bandwidth calculations and such. http://www.extron.com/technology/index.aspx

And Da-Lite is a good spot to find Optics formulas. Most of these article are old, but are probably the most informative and well written you will find.
http://www.da-lite.com/education/angles_of_view.php

Remember, when using sarcasm to use the ampersand "&" as the sarcasm punctuation mark.

Example: My pastor sure is sympathetic to the technical changeless of running a modern worship service&
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Michael 'Bink' Knowles

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Re: Video math
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2006, 01:32:21 pm »

Quote:

...Remember, when using sarcasm to use the ampersand "&" as the sarcasm punctuation mark...


Where'd that one come from? What about faux code such as /sarc or [/sarcasm]...

-Bink
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Michael 'Bink' Knowles
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