ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: 1 2 [3]  All   Go Down

Author Topic: liquid cooled subs? alternative?  (Read 6356 times)

Kerry Stansbury

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 39
Re: liquid cooled subs? alternative? heat sink?
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2006, 08:52:18 pm »

Just because you can't feel a warmer temperature of the air passing through the vents doesn't mean it's not removing heat. If you move a large volume of air fast enough you won't feel any temperature difference, even though it's removing heat. Take a frying pan and heat it up on the stove, shut the stove off and have a 22" box fan blow on it. The air that has already passed by the pan will not even feel warm, but the pan will be cooled off in a minute or so. If the air does feel hot, you're not moving enough air to cool at a maximum rate.
Logged
Rolling Thunder

Wayne Parham

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 302
Re: liquid cooled subs? alternative? heat sink?
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2006, 03:35:18 pm »



Kerry Stansbury wrote on Sun, 15 October 2006 19:52

Just because you can't feel a warmer temperature of the air passing through the vents doesn't mean it's not removing heat. If you move a large volume of air fast enough you won't feel any temperature difference, even though it's removing heat. Take a frying pan and heat it up on the stove, shut the stove off and have a 22" box fan blow on it. The air that has already passed by the pan will not even feel warm, but the pan will be cooled off in a minute or so. If the air does feel hot, you're not moving enough air to cool at a maximum rate.


There are a lot of things in play.  First, if the pan is hot at all, it will be radiating heat that you can feel.  Even at just a couple hundred degrees Fahrenheit, it radiates enough to feel.  By 400 degrees, it radiates a lot of heat, even though it is nowhere near luminous.

The air passing over the pan will also carry some heat away, some by convection and if there is liquid in the pan, some by evaporation.  Air rising makes convection, and air blowing over the pan makes forced air convection.  Evaporation of any liquid in the pan removes heat too.

The amount of heat carried by the air can be measured, and if it's a lot, it can be felt.  Stand near a car engine, for example.  You'll feel a lot of heat radiating from the engine.  Put your hand behind the radiator and you'll feel the air carrying a lot of heat too.

I agree with you that not being able to feel heat in the air does not necessarily mean it isn't carrying heat away.  But it is something of an indicator of how much heat is getting carried away.
Logged
Wayne Parham
π Speakers
PiSpeakers.com

Pages: 1 2 [3]  All   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.04 seconds with 18 queries.