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Author Topic: Soundcraft GB8 48  (Read 66011 times)

Michael 'Bink' Knowles

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2006, 05:20:16 pm »

Fred Garrett wrote on Tue, 10 October 2006 14:10

Michael 'Bink' Knowles wrote on Tue, 10 October 2006 10:59



The complaint about the GB8 not having pads is that the GB8 owner will need to stock up on a half dozen of these for most normal shows.

-Bink



We have had our GB8-48 since early April (2006)and have put at least 25 different bands through the board and we have yet to see an input that requires a pad...



Aha! I looked up the thread further and noticed that Bennett was complaining about the level coming at him from a line-level snake with preamps on stage. No wonder he was getting too-hot levels.

I've never used the GB8 so I can't comment on regular mics being too hot, etc. I'll bow to your experience... Thanks for the correction.

-Bink
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Fred Garrett

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #21 on: October 11, 2006, 02:06:15 pm »

Michael 'Bink' Knowles wrote on Tue, 10 October 2006 17:20

 

I've never used the GB8 so I can't comment on regular mics being too hot, etc. I'll bow to your experience... Thanks for the correction.

-Bink




No need to bow!  Laughing   I just wanted to pass along my findings from using the GB8.  

 I will say this.  One of the afore mentioned nationals had a click track drvice that we put in monitors, and I had to pad and lower the gain all the way to keep the signal under control.  The monitor board is a Crest HP-8 which has a "colder" gain knob gain than the GB8 does(I've had that board for about 2 years and I think it was only the 3rd time I have actually engaged a pad button).  Now we probably could have just asked the band to lower the send level on their unit, but had that input been sent to FOH as it was, I believe we would have had an issue with it.

Fred
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Ryan Lantzy

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #22 on: October 15, 2006, 10:45:25 pm »

Alrighty,

Back at it once again this Friday.  It was an interesting day.  A band I frequently work with had this gig scheduled for quite some time.  The scenario was as follows:  Festival setting, Center of town, covered gazebo/pavilion, people in all directions.  The event was all ages where music played a primary role, but extreme volume was not required.  Vendors encircled the center town square so they had to be able to conduct business without yelling.

I advanced with the contracted sound provider to work out logistics of the event.  Each day consisted of several bands.  The band I was wearing my BE hat for, played last during the day.  

Since most of the acts were just 3 or 4 piece, the normal FOH was only a 16 channel console with a couple channels worth of gates/compressors.  I quickly surmised this would not cover the needs of this band.  They usually require a minimum of 24 channels IF there is a monitor split.  When I run Mons from FOH, I run seperate strips for the monitor channels.  So with 7 vocal mics, that puts me in dire need of a 32 channel board.  

So, after talking to Erich Bucholtz (the contracted provider) we worked out a plan together, to use the GB8 all day.  I would show up in the morning and provide the snake and FOH racks/console.  He would bring the normal FOH loudspeakers and monitor system.

Here was the set up around 9AM very early on in the day:

http://photos.lhsoundandlight.com/photos/ligonier/2006.10.13%20Ligonier%20001-1.jpg


We managed a brisk average of 40 degrees during the day.  It's quite cool here in Southwestern PA in October.

It's hard to see from here, but the FOH system was 6 Mackie SRM450s posistioned around the stage.  People are able to sit pretty much anywhere around gazebo, so covering all angles was important.  The picture is decieving... the town square is quite large and has that much room in all four directions plus grassy areas in between.  Additionally, on the FOH side where the band was facing, 2 powered Yorkville subs were used to augment the low end.  I was at first skeptical, but Erich assured me he had used this system there before and some musicians I know informed me that it was very acceptable given the SPL/crowd/expectations of the promoters.

And it was.

Another shot of this beautiful console:

http://photos.lhsoundandlight.com/photos/ligonier/2006.10.13%20Ligonier%20002-1.jpg

Through the day 3 bands performed.  The first was a country/classic rock band fronted by a talented young female vocalist.  The second was a locally renown jazz group.  Erich took the reigns on those two bands.

Since there was an abundance of channels, Erich was able to run a few more mics that normal.  Additionally, we had 4 effects sends in use.  After I did some requested pacthing for Erich, he had the bands sounding pretty sweet in short order.  Erich commented that the board was a dream to drive and that the EQ was very responsive.  A specific comment I remembered was that other boards he had worked with took a bit of cranking on the EQ knobs to get anything to happen... the GB8 made quick work of things with minimal adjustment.  I felt the quality of the signal was completely preserved with the EQing that was done.  

Here's the view from our seat during the first performer's set.

http://photos.lhsoundandlight.com/photos/ligonier/2006.10.13%20Ligonier%20011-1.jpg

At 5PM, it was my turn.  After the chaos that ensues during a band changeover at these smallish festivals, the last band got right into it with only a line check on vocals.  I never like going in blind like that but it happens enough that I'm used to it.

I was able to navigate the board VERY quickly.  With what I thought was a very thin sound for the first 30-45 seconds I had the band dialed in by the end of the first song.  Considering this was only the 3rd time using the board, I was surprised how at home I felt.  Soundcraft has done an excellent job of color contrasting the knobs and screen printing.  It really felt like second nature at this point.

Now let me do a little waffling...  I previously complained of a lack of pads.  However, while using Erich's AKG D112 on kick nary did I ever notice a clip light.  Remember, this last band is a full on rock and roll brass band.  We're talking Tower of Power, Chicago, Ides of March, Motown: all powerful music.  The musicians really get into it and the GB8 handled the load with ease.  I would say, don't worry about the lack of pads.  Buy a couple external pads for insurance and you are no worse for the wear.

Next week, weather permitting, we'll have the console outdoors at the Roxbury Band Shell in Johnstown, PA.  The challenge here will be running 4 effect mixes and 4 monitor mixes from FOH.  I'll provide a set of front fills as well on the matrices.

If any of you are interested in coming out to see this bad boy in action, check out the networking and invitation thread in the Basement.  I've put a map and website with information in a post there.

   http://srforums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/m/153573/15698/0// /6617/#msg_153573

P.S.  I have to add.  Erich was an absolute dream to work with.  Very professional, easy going, and knowledgable.  He made my day and the bands' a great one.  Kudos Erich if you are out there reading this, and to anyone that knows him tell him you read that here!
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Ryan Lantzy
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Ryan McLeod

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2006, 09:57:58 pm »

David Morison wrote on Tue, 12 September 2006 07:59

Hey, good review, thanks.
Have you had the chance to compare it with the Series TWO? It seems to offer just a very slightly different set of features for a bit more money - I'm not sure how it's meant to fit in Soundcraft's line, unless they're going to ditch the TWO in the near future.
Cheers,
David.


Hey David -

I own both a Series-TWO/32ch and a GB-4/32. They are very similar in size once in a nice case, so I would imagine that the GB-8 is considerably larger, especially when you get to 40 or 48 channels.

As far as I know, the Series-TWO has been around for quite some time, And when I bought it (years ago) I chose it because it was an 8-bus/8-aux console that seemed like an excellent value - "cheap" compared to other 8/8 offerings at the time, considering that it's made in England.

It has yet to adopt the "MH/GB" Color scheme & Styling, and I imagine that with the GB-8 offering a similar feature set (a few more features in some ways, a few less in others) that the GB series will eventually replace the Series-TWO, if it hasn't already.

Ryan


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Ryan Lantzy

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #24 on: October 22, 2006, 05:09:33 pm »

Ryan Lantzy wrote on Sun, 15 October 2006 22:45


Next week, weather permitting, we'll have the console outdoors at the Roxbury Band Shell in Johnstown, PA.  


Ugh,

The weather.  Well, since the weather could not decide what it wanted to do today the event was called off.  The facilities aren't really there to expidite a quick load out in the event of rain and neither I nor the musicians wanted a truck full of ruined rained on gear.

It looks like the next time out with this console will be at Evan's LAB get together in Maryland.  I'll be hauling this beast down south.  This seems to be turning out to be quite a production for the young padawan learner from the southern side of the Mason Dixon line.

The intended use this time around will be full on monitor duty.  I'll be hauling a split snake down and a cue wedge for lots of fun on side stage.

I'll probably run the console in fader flip mode and hopefully insert the EQs.

This next one is indoors so the weather shouldn't play a factor.   Confused
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Ryan Lantzy
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Mathew Thomas

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #25 on: October 23, 2006, 04:04:00 am »

was reading the specs of the GB8, and its states that it has a 1kHz oscillator. can anyone tell me what exactly this is and what is its function? thanks, appreciate it.
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Ryan Lantzy

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #26 on: October 23, 2006, 08:51:14 am »

Mathew Thomas wrote on Mon, 23 October 2006 04:04

was reading the specs of the GB8, and its states that it has a 1kHz oscillator. can anyone tell me what exactly this is and what is its function? thanks, appreciate it.



The oscillator is commonly used for checking gain stages down the signal chain to the amplifiers.  You could also check the gain staging of effects units through the aux sends.  

Otherwise it's a quick and dirty way to see if you have everything correctly connected from the mixer out to the amplifiers/loudspeakers.

Tyically, to check gain staging, with the loudspeakers disconnected you would assign the oscillator to a mix.  Then increase the level until it would start to just barely hit the clip lights, of the mix bus.  Then go down the chain for EQ/xover/limiter/amplifier/etc. and make them all clip at the same point.

There is more in the study hall on the subject.  I suggest you read about it there.
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Ryan Lantzy
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #27 on: October 23, 2006, 10:00:03 am »

Mathew Thomas wrote on Mon, 23 October 2006 03:04

was reading the specs of the GB8, and its states that it has a 1kHz oscillator. can anyone tell me what exactly this is and what is its function? thanks, appreciate it.


Once upon a time the CR osc would be used to put slate tones on master tapes to confirm reference levels (they would also use other  high and low frequencies to confirm frequency response).

These days the tone is probably used as a constant feed to confirm some audio link is functional (sat, recording truck, etc.) for troubleshooting, setting levels, or just to keep the link active.

JR
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Eric Snodgrass

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Re: Soundcraft GB8 48
« Reply #28 on: October 23, 2006, 11:52:37 am »

John Roberts  {JR} wrote on Mon, 23 October 2006 07:00

Mathew Thomas wrote on Mon, 23 October 2006 03:04

was reading the specs of the GB8, and its states that it has a 1kHz oscillator. can anyone tell me what exactly this is and what is its function? thanks, appreciate it.


Once upon a time the CR osc would be used to put slate tones on master tapes to confirm reference levels (they would also use other  high and low frequencies to confirm frequency response).

These days the tone is probably used as a constant feed to confirm some audio link is functional (sat, recording truck, etc.) for troubleshooting, setting levels, or just to keep the link active.

JR

Yep.  For corporates and television gigs video guys love the tone from the FOH mixer down the line to them so they can calibrate their record levels.  Very handy.
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Mac Kerr

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Tones
« Reply #29 on: October 23, 2006, 02:17:05 pm »

John Roberts  {JR} wrote on Mon, 23 October 2006 10:00

Once upon a time the CR osc would be used to put slate tones on master tapes to confirm reference levels (they would also use other  high and low frequencies to confirm frequency response).
Not to be a contrarian, but a slate is the identification between takes, noting what that take is. The tone that accompanied a slate could have been 1k, but was more likely to have been 100Hz, or something even lower so that it could be heard as a tone in fast wind mode. Some recording consoles would output that tone, and turn on the TB mic when you pushed the "slate" button, allowing you to ID the take while the tone was recording. Alignment tones of 1kHz at operating level, and 100Hz and 10kHz at operating level, or 10dB below operating level at 7.5ips were used for physical and electronic alignment between tape machines, and were usually only at the head of each tape, or even only the head of the first tape of a session.

Mac
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