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Author Topic: Peavey VSX26 Review  (Read 42619 times)

Kent Clasen

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #30 on: May 04, 2007, 11:35:34 am »

Michael 'Bink' Knowles wrote on Fri, 27 April 2007 19:09

Quote:

The hiss from this unit is very audible IMO...


I understand that the VSX26 output is capable of +24 which is definitely higher than your amp needs in order to produce full power. It's 4dB higher than the DRPA specs, for instance, and about 10dB higher than typical DRPA usage. Instead of turning your amps up halfway and listening, try turning your amps all the way down to start. Then bring up a CD (or whatever) on your mixer so that it shows rockin' LEDs and pump that into the VSX so it shows happy levels coming in. Only THEN do you move back to the amps and bring them carefully up to expected show SPL plus a another notch for headroom. Shut the CD off and listen once more for hiss. I'm betting it will be lower and I'm betting your amp volume knobs will be lower than halfway.

-Bink




Thanks for the info Bink.

You are correct, reducing the attenuator on the amps is the only way to get the hiss to be acceptable IMO.  I haven't used it in the intended church yet, but will let you know.  I think we will have enough gain.  I am not familiar with the DRPA (loud POP issue), but have used the 260 which has output +22dB without this issue.  This is the first of any DSP units I have used where it was an issue.

The LF intermittent noise gremelin went away when we switched to another VSX unit...errr.  So far, 2 of 3 have had an "issue".

I was hoping they have a low cost solution DSP, but not so sure about that now.  The PC GUI still doesn't work direct to the unit as far as I know...

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Kent Clasen
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Robert Fielder

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #31 on: May 04, 2007, 06:21:28 pm »

This is actually humourous.

A Peavey with a hiss problem. After all the trash talk about Behringer, it turns out that the DCX2496 is quite silent, but the so-called superiour brand has the problem most accuse Behringer of.

Guess that eliminates one more DSP from my short list. Down to a DCX2496 or a dBx 260.....
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Robert Fielder
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Bennett Prescott

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #32 on: May 05, 2007, 12:46:02 pm »

Robert Fielder wrote on Fri, 04 May 2007 18:21

A Peavey with a hiss problem. After all the trash talk about Behringer, it turns out that the DCX2496 is quite silent, but the so-called superiour brand has the problem most accuse Behringer of.

A little research would show you that the reason most of the advanced users on this board refuse to deal with Behringer has nothing to do with whether their products actually work.
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Robert Fielder

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #33 on: May 06, 2007, 12:25:32 am »

[quote title=Bennett Prescott wrote on Sat, 05 May 2007 12:46}
A little research would show you that the reason most of the advanced users on this board refuse to deal with Behringer has nothing to do with whether their products actually work.[/quote]
Bennett:

Sorry, but the most given reason is that Behringers: are noisey, unreliable, and represent intellectual theft, in that order from what I have read.

Which does not alter my point, or the humour in the situation.
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Robert Fielder
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #34 on: May 06, 2007, 10:44:55 am »

Robert Fielder wrote on Sat, 05 May 2007 23:25


Bennett Prescott wrote on Sat, 05 May 2007 12:46}
A little research would show you that the reason most of the advanced users on this board refuse to deal with Behringer has nothing to do with whether their products actually work. -end quote
Bennett:

Sorry, but the most given reason is that Behringers: are noisey, unreliable, and represent intellectual theft, in that order from what I have read.

Which does not alter my point, or the humour in the situation.



I thought the order was 1) lack of intellectual integrity 2) substitution of substandard components, and 3) poor customer service. Noise performance AFAIK was similar to the products they patterned after with the exception of cases where they left out a shield in a direct box transformer and stuff like that. With digital products there's only a handful of companies making the chip sets used so performance as limited by the chip sets will be similar.

Of course my ordering and significance of these considerations may change with time, product, and personal bias, as may your sense of humor.

JR

edit: spelling and quotes
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Michael 'Bink' Knowles

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #35 on: May 06, 2007, 11:13:33 am »

John Roberts  {JR} wrote on Sun, 06 May 2007 07:44

I thought the order was 1) lack of intellectual integrity 2) substitution of substandard components, and 3) poor customer service...


Yeah, those are the sweeping truths. Adding 4) inferior audio throughput would have to be dependent on specific product. Some Behringer products were/are good sounding for the price, others shouldn't be recommended at all. Digital Behringer products, in general, sound much better than analog Behringer.

I feel that Peavey remains far ahead in integrity, components and service and in many cases, sound quality. You get what you pay for... Of course, we'd all like to see the VSX computer GUI finished and there's probably some reallocation of Hartley's resources that would enable a more prompt release date but it's his company to do with as he sees fit. He's a willful maverick and an independent cuss but he's so much more ethical than Uli it's not even funny.

-Bink
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #36 on: May 06, 2007, 03:53:22 pm »

Bink-

I agree about the interesting allocation of development funds at Peavey.

I'd love to try a VSX48 in our monitor rigs, and potentially that means a 12 piece order.  The live GUI might be less of an issue in that application, but I think it needs to ready for prime time as part of our purchasing decision.

Time will tell, I guess.

Tim Mc
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Robert Fielder

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #37 on: May 08, 2007, 09:39:27 am »

I listed the slams against Behringer according to the numbers as I have read them. Others will have read different messages.

However, the number of messages I received that complained about how Behringer copies technology from other companies was actually very few, and often added as an afterthought.

The most common reasons for not using Behringer that I have been given when asked, and that I have seen reading other discussions here and elsewhere, was that first, they are noisy, and second, they are unreliable.

What I found most fascinating was when I asked on two DJ forums about the Behringer CX2310 crossover. There were two basic responses - those that had one, loved it, found it quiet and reliable even after a few years of service. Those that did not have one and had never used one said they were noisy and unreliable. There was exactly one person who had tried the CX2310 and found it too noisy and decided not to buy one - but he qualified his response by admitting he had cranked the levels way up to get the noise.

Given that sort of response, what soft of conclusion would YOU come to?

I am not tring to start a Behringer war, or hijack this disucssion - I am just explaining my earlier comments.

However, all this does bring me to a question - if many people say that Behringer is known to borrow technology, how do they explain the DCX2496? My understanding is that it was released either at the same time as the DRPA/DR 260 (whichever came first), or else it was a little earlier. How can you claim such a product is based on stolen technology when that technology has not been released yet?

If my understanding of the release dates is incorrect, please let me know. If there is something else I am not aware of, please advise. This is something I have been wondering about....

Also - there have been a few comments that the VSX 48 does not have the same noise issues that the VSX 26 has. However, I have seen messages that indicate that the VSX 48 is not available. Is this because it is out of stock, or has the VSX 48 not started shipping yet?
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Robert Fielder
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #38 on: May 08, 2007, 11:01:42 am »

Robert Fielder wrote on Tue, 08 May 2007 08:39

I listed the slams against Behringer according to the numbers as I have read them. Others will have read different messages.

However, the number of messages I received that complained about how Behringer copies technology from other companies was actually very few, and often added as an afterthought.

The most common reasons for not using Behringer that I have been given when asked, and that I have seen reading other discussions here and elsewhere, was that first, they are noisy, and second, they are unreliable.

What I found most fascinating was when I asked on two DJ forums about the Behringer CX2310 crossover. There were two basic responses - those that had one, loved it, found it quiet and reliable even after a few years of service. Those that did not have one and had never used one said they were noisy and unreliable. There was exactly one person who had tried the CX2310 and found it too noisy and decided not to buy one - but he qualified his response by admitting he had cranked the levels way up to get the noise.

Given that sort of response, what soft of conclusion would YOU come to?

I am not tring to start a Behringer war, or hijack this disucssion - I am just explaining my earlier comments.

No explanation required. We all form opinions based on our personal experience.
Quote:


However, all this does bring me to a question - if many people say that Behringer is known to borrow technology, how do they explain the DCX2496? My understanding is that it was released either at the same time as the DRPA/DR 260 (whichever came first), or else it was a little earlier. How can you claim such a product is based on stolen technology when that technology has not been released yet?

If my understanding of the release dates is incorrect, please let me know. If there is something else I am not aware of, please advise. This is something I have been wondering about....

They are indeed known to "borrow" and pattern their products after other company's successful products. That doesn't mean every product has to be an exact copy of somebody else. I'm not sure how you are defining the category. PV has been making DSP based digital crossovers for years before these other guys thought about entering the category.

I would love to see more of his engineering resources applied to novel solutions, there has to be less iconic category killers, to copy these days.

Quote:


Also - there have been a few comments that the VSX 48 does not have the same noise issues that the VSX 26 has. However, I have seen messages that indicate that the VSX 48 is not available. Is this because it is out of stock, or has the VSX 48 not started shipping yet?



I have no idea about either of these units, well after my time. PV reps are known to lurk here from time to time as evidenced by the old thread you resurrected, or you could ask them on a Peavey forum. You might get a more comprehensive answer if you don't begin with derogatory comments about the product series.

JR
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Don Boomer

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Re: Peavey VSX26 Review
« Reply #39 on: May 09, 2007, 08:11:29 am »

Also - there have been a few comments that the VSX 48 does not have the same noise issues that the VSX 26 has. However, I have seen messages that indicate that the VSX 48 is not available. Is this because it is out of stock, or has the VSX 48 not started shipping yet?

The "noise issue" is really a misunderstanding by most users that think they are having a problem.  The noise spec is -107 dB below full scale ... hardly noisey.  But if you use high gain amplifiers (ours included) you need to scale back the sensitivity probably about 15 dB or so.  Unfortunately we did not provide an adjustment on the unit itself so the correction must be made on the amplifier end od the line instead of the crossover output, which is the way more people are used to doing it.  Either way it comes out the same electrically.  If you use Crest amps and set the gain switch to x20 there is no problem.  There is a white paper on our website (that is very similar to they way DBX would have you set up their systems)   http://peavey.com/assets/literature/additional/00420060_7.pd f.

As far as the VSX48 being different ... it is not.  VSX48's have not yet been released for general sale (although they can be had in a beta release ... check with your dealer)
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