ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 8   Go Down

Author Topic: TT24  (Read 45688 times)

Steve Beatty

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13
Re: ROAD TEST
« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2006, 03:28:13 pm »

Hi there-

If you read the first post completely, you will see that I mention that the band has their own engineer mixing FOH for the show !! I took advantage of this opportunity to create the recording mix on the tt24 so that we may try out the console without " hurting anyone " !! Very Happy

Steve
Logged

Michael 'Bink' Knowles

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4279
    • http://www.binkster.net/index.shtml
Re: ROAD TEST
« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2006, 04:37:03 pm »

Steve Beatty wrote on Tue, 02 May 2006 12:28

...I took advantage of this opportunity to create the recording mix on the tt24 so that we may try out the console without " hurting anyone " !! Very Happy

Steve


Except yourself! Ouch!  Shocked

Since this is a recording gig you're using the TT24 in such a way as to highlight its preamps, compression, reverb and i/o clarity. I already know from experience the default compression is sweet and uncolored and the preamps happily neutral-sounding. Do you think you'll be trying any crunchy/gritty/colored compression techniques? Regarding reverb: I'm curious to find out what you think of the built-in selections and how useful you find them. I never used the 'verb with headphones on a recording--I just know that the patches do what they say they do with respect to sound in a live venue.

-Bink
Logged
Michael 'Bink' Knowles
www.binkster.net

Andy Peters

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 9104
    • http://www.latke.net/
Re: Road Test
« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2006, 04:38:49 pm »

Steve Beatty wrote on Tue, 02 May 2006 12:28

If you read the first post completely, you will see that I mention that the band has their own engineer mixing FOH for the show !! I took advantage of this opportunity to create the recording mix on the tt24 so that we may try out the console without " hurting anyone " !! Very Happy


Sorry!  That little detail got lost in all the mishegass about the whole review concept.

-a
Logged
"This isn't some upside down inverted Socratic method where you throw out your best guess answers and I correct your work." -- JR


"On the Internet, nobody can hear you mix a band."

Kele Moore

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
TT24
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2006, 05:27:38 pm »

I find it odd that the band didn't soundcheck.  If the intent of the reviewer is to see if the board could be picked up quickly by a visiting engineer, then why no sound check?  I know if I come into a venue with a board I'm not familiar with, I take advantage of soundcheck to familiarize myself.  I know his issue with feedback could have been avoided with a proper soundcheck.  Was the intent to see if the board could be run'and'gunned?  
Logged
What did I just forget?

Steve Beatty

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13
Re: ROAD TEST
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2006, 10:55:29 pm »

Please re-read the original post. It clearly states that soundcheck went well !!
Logged

Kele Moore

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 26
Re: ROAD TEST
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2006, 11:32:47 pm »

Check.  Missed that little tidbit.  *adjusts blinders*
Logged
What did I just forget?

Steve Beatty

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 13
Re: Road Test
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2006, 01:47:30 am »

During the break between sets, the BE asked me to show hin around the console. Though I had a relatively short, ( and a little frantic ) time with it, I was able to get him moving through the console's features in under ten minutes. At which point, I asked him to help me modify the internal effects on the tt24 to similar parameters that he was using on the dual engine TC M1 he was using for the lead singer's vocal effect.

As I mentioned before, I had set up a cathedral-type reverb, and a 400 ms delay with 30% feedback. He quickly moved through the easily found effects parameters on the Mackie, and lengthened the pre-delay, shortend the length, and most importantly, EQ'd the delay to provide a similar sound as the old " telephone " effect. Matching these details to my existing mix proved invaluable.

I had another few minutes to evaluate my first set mix on my headphones ( Sony 9506 , and was pleasantly surprised. The great mix isn't what grabbed me though, it was the total lack of noise. Trespassers William plays incredibly quiet on stage, and I had pre-amps running fairly hot. Even between songs, there was no noise, no hiss, no air - no nothing. These obviously were not the old 1604 pre's !!

My first thought on this was that the switch from the global phantom switch on many Mackie models to the individual 48v channel switches may have helped in this arena, but I can't say for sure - but it was silent.

I made a punch list of several compressor and EQ settings that could help the mix, and jumped right in when the music began. Using my HP laptop, hooked to the USB bus on the tt24 gave me the full-color clarity and definition necessary to make the precise adjustments I had noted. The tt24's software offers the user a GREAT click-and-drag 4 band parametric per channel. Changes could be made quickly, and the visual of the EQ curve being altered, while I listened in the headphones provided me with one of the unexpected benefits of using a digital console.

The settings of the compressors and gates offered me both adjustable virtual dials, as well as a very cool linear graph with different icons colored differently for threshold, ratio, and release. Again, the console responded quickly, and effectively.

I don't know that I would want to mix a large show in this fashion without a comprehensive soundcheck, as it certainly more time-consuming than grabbing a knob in the analog world, but the visuals provided an intuitive and truthful display of what was going on with each dynamics processor.

Satisfied with my changes, I scrolled over all the channels in the " Overview " mode, and saw mini- displays of everything going on with each channel, including a horizontal bar graph of all my aux sends - vital when I would be using the console to mix monitors from FOH in two nights !!

Back to the recording. I use a TC Electronic Finalizer 96K to process all my recordings - have for years. The TC was hooked up to the 96K AES output of the Mackie. Instantly, by looking at the meters of the TC, I could tell that the changes made to the tt24's channels were driving the entire mix better, and indeed, it did sound better in the cans.

What I found troubling however, was my inability to label the channels on my laptop. ( Gil, did I miss something? ) Instead of " CHANNEL 3 " - I really wanted to see " HI-HAT ", but again, I may have missed the edit function somewhere...

Also, I dream of being able to set up scenes for bands on long plane flights, while saving them on my laptop. Did I miss that part of the software as well?

I have a track or two from the show that the band would like to release - would everyone like to hear them?

We have a show with the prestigious singer-songwriter Ellis Paul in two days. I will be using the tt24 to mix the FOH, so stay tuned.
Logged

Dave Stevens

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1983
Re: ROAD TEST
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2006, 03:20:57 am »

Steve Beatty wrote on Wed, 03 May 2006 22:47

I don't know that I would want to mix a large show in this fashion without a comprehensive soundcheck, as it certainly more time-consuming than grabbing a knob in the analog world,


That's something that's common to new users of surfaces.  Once you get more familiar many people find it faster to use a smaller surface than a larger console.  It's easier for me at this point to hop around on a D1 than it is something large frame like an H3k or XL4.  When the form factors are between something like a Venice and the TT, the differences aren't so apparent but on a large frame console the difference can be pretty apparent.  The other side of the coin is that without some sort of overview screen, some people aren't comfortable  with layers and SEL buttons.

As you work with surfaces more you'll get used to it and it won't be so daunting.

Dave
Logged
======================================
Revenge of the Chick Car...
A Barking Dog Goes Road Racing in 2011
http://www.roaddog.com/racing/

Alexandre Richer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 252
Re: ROAD TEST
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2006, 03:26:30 am »

Quote:

My first thought on this was that the switch from the global phantom switch on many Mackie models to the individual 48v channel switches may have helped in this arena, but I can't say for sure - but it was silent.


Unlikely:  http://www.peavey.com/support/technotes/mixers/noise_console s.cfm

You mention the software. have you used Yamaha's Studio Manager? And if so, how does it compare to the Mackie software? I don't think Mackie had the software available when Bink did his review, but I could be wrong.

On edit, er, oops, I forget you're new to this whole digital console business.. but what about other users of the tt24?
Logged

John Roberts {JR}

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 0
Re: ROAD TEST
« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2006, 10:27:05 am »

Alexandre Richer wrote on Thu, 04 May 2006 02:26


Unlikely:   http://www.peavey.com/support/technotes/mixers/noise_console s.cfm

You mention the software. have you used Yamaha's Studio Manager? And if so, how does it compare to the Mackie software? I don't think Mackie had the software available when Bink did his review, but I could be wrong.

On edit, er, oops, I forget you're new to this whole digital console business.. but what about other users of the tt24?


Wow, it's been a few years since I wrote that... Still holds water. I was a little uncomfortable to see where somebody had cut in a more recent product reference (which is since obsolete).

Agreed, the phantom power is not likely to explain apparent noise floor. Digital consoles will still have most of the noise components of an analog console with one exception. There will not be a noise contribution from a summing bus combining amplifier although you will still experience the noise buildup from combining multiple channel noise floors incoherently.

In a digital console I would be very tempted to apply some mild noise gating (or downward expansion) at every channel. This could be done pretty transparently and would make the quiet parts quieter if only the channels contributing signal are contributing noise.

This sounds like a good question to answer by somebody who actually knows, namely one of the product's designers.  

JR

Logged
 https://www.resotune.com/


Tune it, or don't play it...
-----
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 8   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.051 seconds with 19 queries.