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Author Topic: Installation Cabling  (Read 3866 times)

Corey Willis

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Installation Cabling
« on: March 08, 2006, 05:09:36 pm »

Just wondering what everyone uses as far as installation cabling. I'm mainly a sound guy, getting into A/V a little more. I have a projector installation coming up, and in the past few I've done, I used pre-fab cables for lack of anything better. I was wondering if there was any kind of cabling that can be terminated on-site effectively. (Looking at composite, which I know how to do, but also s-video and SVGA) Thanks!
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Ken Freeman

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Re: Installation Cabling
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2006, 12:26:53 am »

I use a lot of 5 wire with BNC's for most of the installs we do to projectors because of the length.  Yes, we terminate them in the field.  I do use 15 pin as well and we try not to terminate it in the field.

Ken
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Ken Freeman

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Solderless DB-15
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2006, 12:19:38 am »

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Austin Parker

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Re: Installation Cabling
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2006, 12:50:27 am »

I have used 5 chan mini wire. For connections, I used a kit by Liberty Cable. The kit contains all the tools needed, just add the parts.
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Austin Parker

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Josh Millward

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Re: Installation Cabling
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2006, 12:44:18 pm »

When I am doing installation work I will typically use West Penn Wire for audio lines since it is readily availible to me. I use as follows:
WP 10454 - Microphone and line level
WP 224 - Short distance 70V systems (1 pair, 18 AWG twisted)
WP 226 or 227 for low impedance loudspeaker runs or longer distance 70V systems

I really like the 454 because it is much easier to work with than 291 and the jacket is a bit more hardy. It also has a lower capacitance than regular 291, but is similar to the 291D. WP 454 is also availible in a whole host of different colors if you want to color coordinate your signal lines.

When running video lines, be they composite or hidef or s-vid, I generally try to find some West Penn 806 and run however many of those cables are needed to do what I need to do (1 for composite, 2 for S-Video, ..., 5 for RGBHV). WP 806 is RG-6 coax with a solid copper center conductor and 95% copper shield, no foil. I will then generally terminate it with an appropriately colored RCA or BNC Snap-n-Seal connector. If I have to go to a HD-15 connector, I will get a female BNC to HD-15 adaptor whip from any numer of different sources. If there isn't enough room to run 5 WP806's, then I'll look for whatever deal I can find on some of the mini 5 or 6 coax in a bundle deals.

The trick with putting in the 5 WP806's is to either have 5 spools of it, or pull off enough to make it work in just one pull. Bad things can happen when you are pulling more and more RG-6 on top of itself, it isn't hard to rub right through the insulation on the cable. I guess in general it is a good idea to pull one pipe at a time, pull the WHOLE pipe. If you have (horror of horrors) more than one type of signal in a pipe, get all the wire types taped together and pull them all at once.

For control wire I will typically pull a simple cat 6 UTP cable. This makes it easy to do a couple different things at the other end. For instance, if I am putting in a camera with a built in microphone, I can put camera power on the blue pair, audio on the orange pair, and a motion detector on the green and brown pairs (for power and signal for the motion detector). Or, you can always do some contact closures... the point is that Cat 6 UTP cable is very worthwhile and useful since there are 8 conductors in it and you can terminate it to a 66 or 110 punchdown block, or screw terminal strip, or just about anything you want to do.

CATV wiring I generally use some good Quad shield RG-6 for basic drop lines and RG-11 for main trunking lines. Most important, though, when doing CATV work is having a good quality meter so you can balance and level the system, because it is almost impossible to do it right without one, but that is a whole 'nother post all by itself!

Josh Millward
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Josh Millward
Danley Sound Labs

Bobby Welliver

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Re: Installation Cabling
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2006, 09:57:57 am »

Another vote for liberty cable, the system they have is easy to use for anyone and termination is a snap.

Bobby
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Brian K Tennyson, CTS-D

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Re: Installation Cabling
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2006, 05:48:03 pm »

Austin Parker wrote on Mon, 22 May 2006 23:50

I have used 5 chan mini wire. For connections, I used a kit by Liberty Cable. The kit contains all the tools needed, just add the parts.


Liberty now has a 24 gage solid core for the mini that uses a single peice connector. Sweet.
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Austin Parker

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Re: Installation Cabling
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2006, 11:05:07 am »

very nice. I really like how liberty uses the "snap" on pins. As long as you make sure that there aren't any strands from the shield and you hear 2 "snaps" when terminating then it's almost 100% guaranteed to work.
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Austin Parker

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