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Author Topic: The science of lighting.  (Read 1695 times)

Adam Feldstain

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The science of lighting.
« on: February 07, 2006, 06:39:35 pm »

In an upcoming skating show I would like to try to light it with some LED fixtures I have from SGM. The fixtures have a 2200 lumen output (lux) each with an output wattage of about 100w each. We have a 25 degree and a 40 degree lense for each. The rink is 200ft x 600ft.

If I use 36 fixtures with a 40 degree lense flown at 30ft do you think I will have sufficient light output for the show. If not can anyone offer a better formula?
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Adam Feldstain
Pro-Optic Lighting
djallf AT djallf DOT com

Jamey Brock

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Re: The science of lighting.
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2006, 10:11:24 am »

Hopefully this is not going to be on camera.....I doubt if you'll have enough output if it is for video or TV.

If it is for spectators only, you should be OK, but it will not be the best lit ice rink around.....I am not a fan of LEDs, just yet, as they are too inconsistent and not enough output for most large, professional applications, but are great for specials and "fill."

I would love to see a photo of how it comes out.....LED fixtures make rigging and power issues minimized.

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Jamey Brock
Martin Professional, Inc.

Duane Massey

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Re: The science of lighting.
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2006, 10:47:21 am »

Hello, Jamey
Although I am also reluctant to jump on the LED bandwagon, Thomas Engineering brought by some demo units of their touring units, and these things are truly impressive! Of course, one fixture costs more than my monthly salary (and then some..), but the par-type can can actually keep up with a real par.
Cool stuff, but $$$$$$.
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Duane Massey
Houston, Texas, USA

Jamey Brock

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Re: The science of lighting.
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2006, 09:57:01 am »

I guess the cost advantage would be operating without a dimmer rack....if you consider those costs, it is probably about the same....

I have still found that differences in consistency between multiple fixtures from different manufacturing runs can cause some problems when it comes to TV of film...most "live" performances are not as particular, although a good LD will let you know if they are acceptable or not....

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Jamey Brock
Martin Professional, Inc.

len woelfel

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Re: The science of lighting.
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2006, 09:15:59 pm »

One other factor with ice rinks is the ice itself.  It seems to "suck lumens" and not reflect like other surfaces.  No matter what fixture you go with I would suggest one of two things, and preferably both:  calculate the amount you'll need for any regular surface and double it; get this special reflective paint designed for ice rinks (the name ofwhich escapes me at the moment) and put that down under the ice.  It's the best way to get the lights to pop.
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