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Author Topic: DCX2496 Behringer Crossover  (Read 56312 times)

Mike Butler (media)

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Re: DCX2496 Behringer Crossover
« Reply #130 on: March 13, 2007, 01:41:24 pm »

Robert Fielder wrote on Fri, 29 September 2006 10:05

...It also sounds like a lot of people would have kept using the DCX2496 except for one flaw, which may or may not be a design flaw. The flaw can be fixed. In reality, who wants to spend the time and money buying something, than having to fix it? But, if you get a good one, pretty much everyone who has actually used the DCX2496 only says good things about it. Even those who had them fail, have a lot of good things to say.....

Robert, I have also been weighing the +/-'s of the DCX2496. I have heard the same rave reviews as well as Ivan's hard times with these. Seems to me there have also been scare stories about ribbon cables in certain Mackie products, and I know you love your Mackie mixer (and I love the few Mackie amps and one Mackie mixer I still have left). You may get a DCX and love it. And if it does act up, they will replace it. I hadn't heard until now the fate of Ivan's dud units. I can certainly understand his reluctance to use more of them, especially since it involves so much more when you have sold and installed these in a customer's venue.

I'd still set aside a few inches of gaffer's tape to put over the logos on the DCX.  Laughing
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Robert Fielder

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Re: DCX2496 Behringer Crossover
« Reply #131 on: March 14, 2007, 10:04:34 am »

Mike Butler (media) wrote on Tue, 13 March 2007 13:41

Robert, I have also been weighing the +/-'s of the DCX2496. I have heard the same rave reviews as well as Ivan's hard times with these. Seems to me there have also been scare stories about ribbon cables in certain Mackie products, and I know you love your Mackie mixer (and I love the few Mackie amps and one Mackie mixer I still have left). You may get a DCX and love it. And if it does act up, they will replace it. I hadn't heard until now the fate of Ivan's dud units. I can certainly understand his reluctance to use more of them, especially since it involves so much more when you have sold and installed these in a customer's venue.

Once burned, twice shy is very appropriate when it is your reputation, and possibly your livelyhood, that gets burned.

One of the things I like about the DCX2496, DRPA, etc is the EQs built in.

However, I am having a personal internal debate about using an EQ. This is a debate I am both winning and losing.

My concern is that the EQ is for your entire system. I have two laptops using two different sound cards. The sound from the two different sound cards might not be the same. This implies, to my limited understanding, that each laptop should be EQ'd just a little differently to produce the same sound. Which implies a software EQ on the laptop, not a hardware EQ that changes everything.

Another concern I have about Behringer prodcuts is their "WARANTEE EXCHANGE PROGRAM". My concern is because it appears that each retailer can choose to be a part of this program - or not be a part of the program. Which means that if you don't ask the right questions when buying the products, you may be in for an extended wait for any repairs, rather than an across the counter swap of a defective unit.

Mike Butler (media) wrote on Tue, 13 March 2007 13:41

I'd still set aside a few inches of gaffer's tape to put over the logos on the DCX.  Laughing

I hear you. I don't agree, but I hear you.  Laughing
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Robert Fielder
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Andy Peters

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Re: DCX2496 Behringer Crossover
« Reply #132 on: March 14, 2007, 03:17:55 pm »

Robert Fielder wrote on Wed, 14 March 2007 07:04


One of the things I like about the DCX2496, DRPA, etc is the EQs built in.

However, I am having a personal internal debate about using an EQ. This is a debate I am both winning and losing.

My concern is that the EQ is for your entire system. I have two laptops using two different sound cards. The sound from the two different sound cards might not be the same. This implies, to my limited understanding, that each laptop should be EQ'd just a little differently to produce the same sound. Which implies a software EQ on the laptop, not a hardware EQ that changes everything.


I think you misunderstand the reason for the EQ in this sort of box.

It's for use as a system equalizer.  You use it to get the system response flat.  Once you do this, you lock it and leave it (unless the system configuration changes.)

You then use mixer channel-strip tone controls to fix individual inputs.  If one sound card sounds different from the other, then you fix that with the mixer.  (If one sound card sounds different from the other, then one or the other might be broken.)

-a
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Robert Fielder

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Re: DCX2496 Behringer Crossover
« Reply #133 on: March 21, 2007, 12:01:00 pm »

Andy Peters wrote on Wed, 14 March 2007 15:17

I think you misunderstand the reason for the EQ in this sort of box.

It's for use as a system equalizer.  You use it to get the system response flat.  Once you do this, you lock it and leave it (unless the system configuration changes.)

Andy:

Thank you for the response. What you say is making me think, and possibly change how I very my setup.

I understand what you are saying. Guess I asked the wrong question, or did not express myself clearly. What you are saying makes sense, but could be tricky to do if you don't have a DSP that produces pink noise or somesuchlike. A simpler system with mixer => crossover => active speakers, for example.

Do you consider the "system" to be everything from the crossover/DSP out, or do you consider the "system" to be everything from sound source out?

I have been looking at "system" to mean everything from the sound file/CD to the listener's ear.

Andy Peters wrote on Wed, 14 March 2007 15:17

If one sound card sounds different from the other, then you fix that with the mixer.  (If one sound card sounds different from the other, then one or the other might be broken.)

I am not sure I can agree with that. Different mixers sound different, different DSP's sound different, different speakers sound different, and different sound cards sound different. If it were otherwise, there would be no need for pro and consumer level sound cards, and no difference between brands.

Ideally, one will have one USB or Firewire sound card with multiple stereo outs. Failing that, multiple sound card cards of the same brand and model. That would eliminate the potential difference between sound cards. Unfortunately, we don't always live in a perfect world, and I have a USB sound card and a firewire sound card.
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Robert Fielder
Brampton, Ontario, Canada
http://www.coolcountrynights.com
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