ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Down

Author Topic: Your Favorite Drums  (Read 6276 times)

Ian Stroupe

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 105
Your Favorite Drums
« on: May 29, 2005, 06:10:34 pm »

Well this post came from my band's show Friday. We played at the drummer's step dad's studio and I he use the kit that was there. I got to use all the good mics Razz and a cool guitar amp but that's another story. The drum kit was a Fibes custom set and micing them up made my subs thump like never before and the sound was just awe inspiring. So do any of you have a favorite set of drums or heads that just sound as good as you couldhope for. I know this is probably a waste of your time and I know tunings and things make a huge different but yikes I am in percussion heaven with that set. Ian
Logged
The Noise Factory/Bluestrings Music

http://Http://www.bluestringsmusic.com

Yorkville Audio Dealer

Andy Peters

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 9104
    • http://www.latke.net/
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2005, 08:27:48 pm »

Favorite drums?

No question: Baltimore Drums.

-a
Logged
"This isn't some upside down inverted Socratic method where you throw out your best guess answers and I correct your work." -- JR


"On the Internet, nobody can hear you mix a band."

David Gunnardo

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 201
    • http://www.davidsljudteknik.se
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2005, 09:45:05 pm »

I have had some great results with a Pearl MMX set with Audix microphones (D6 on kick.. me like  Cool).

I had a rather trashed FIBES-set when i was younger.. i think it was fibes and sonor in a weird mix... I remember that it sounded awful. Smile Are not so in to drums so this is probably te first time since then i have heard of fibes.
Logged
Davids Ljudteknik, Sweden.
www.davidsljudteknik.se

Dan Brown

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1450
    • http://www.reachcomm.net
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2005, 09:48:18 pm »

work with a drummer with a fibes
work with a drummer with a DW
work with a drummer with a Premier

I think that a good drum set is more a combination of the good drummer / good tuning / good drumset.

my cents
Logged

Tim Padrick

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5008
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2005, 02:47:32 am »

In my (admittedly limited) experience, I think the drums are the least important part of the equation, at least when they are close mic'd.  Most of the DW kits I work with sound just as bad when close mic'd as those shallow shell, no bottom head travel kits.      One of the two best sounding kit's I've worked with is a Pacific the guy bought used for a couple hundred bucks.  It's mostly in the heads and the tuning (and the talent, of course).

The Evans Genera Dry snare head changed two of my clients' snares from ringy nuisances to nice, solid snares    

diluted23

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2005, 06:18:12 am »

my fav set is what i play, tama starclassic, maple and performer
Logged

Tom Reid

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7412
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2005, 08:04:10 am »

Just like you can't use a Fender Haguar to play ballads, no one drum kit is going to get the job done.  Kit's are genre specific.

I like Fibes, and Sonor for some studio stuff, for clean thumpy toms ...think old Police tunes, ELP.

I like vintage Ludwig for Rock and Roll ...Zepplin

Tama is a great kit in the right hands, Toto?

Yamaha made some nice kits, Steely Dan?
Logged
tom

What does Buddha do on his day off?

Lee Patzius

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1851
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2005, 10:48:13 am »

I love my very rare Mapex 100% Maple shelled "Mars" series with extra deep 20" kick. (Not to be confused with the popular "M" series, made with a basswood mix. (Basswood? Reminds me of Sea Bass instead of Sharks with laser beams.  Laughing )

Absolutely beautiful sounding. But I do have one drum out of the bunch (it's the smallest 10" shell) that the shell naturally resonates slightly out of key with the rest, but is easily fixable with head tuning.

Never thought I'd put Mapex over my Ludwigs (A blue sparkle vintage set which I miss dearly, wound up stolen from me in Phoenix AZ) Tama (which I play every so often at my friend's house) or my 2 Pearl sets, one vintage white vinyl "leather" coated set which I'm looking at right now. My daughter plays those.

My Roland electronics are for low volume practice in a trailer park 'till 2:00AM Mondays and Thursdays (lead guitarist's place). But that's a whole 'nother catagory.

My friend has a Premier Signia set that sounds great too. The shells are slightly smaller than the head, leaving a larger gap between the head hoop and shell, acting much like a guitar bridge of sorts. Sounds incredible.

I've been very impressed with Sonor, but can't comment without first hand experience.



Logged
Lee Patzius

 

Craig Leerman

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1389
    • http://www.techworksvegas.com
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2005, 05:57:03 pm »

Quote:

So do any of you have a favorite set of drums or heads that just sound as good as you could hope for.


The most important part of the drum sound is choosing the right head for the application, and proper tuning for the sound you want.  Most good drum sets use a comparable quality shell, and most custom drum set makers all use the same shells (Keller) so the real difference in the kits is the heads, tuning, depth of shells, and where/how the hardware mounts to the drums. Better kits will usually use more esoteric hardware and hardware attachment points that allow the shell to vibrate more freely.  Other than that, the difference between most lower priced kits and their high end brethren is usually in wood species, quality of finishes, and better hardware.

There is no "ONE PERFECT" sound for all styles and types of music.

Quote:

No question: Baltimore Drums.


Keith Larsen from Balto Drum does build a nice kit. Keith is not only a great drummer himself, but a real cool guy. He worked for years as a drum salesman in a music store before branching out on his own, first as a small drum store, then as a drum builder. Dennis Chambers plays his stuff (even though he endorses Pearl!), as do lots of other great drummers.  I have a Balto snare drum thats pretty nice.  

Quote:

Just like you can't use a Fender Haguar to play ballads, no one drum kit is going to get the job done. Kit's are genre specific.


Drum kits, nor guitars or any instruments for that matter are genre specific.  While some general trends are seen in certain  musical styles (like jazz drummers seem to prefer smaller tom sizes) they are not absolutes.

Quote:

I like Fibes, and Sonor for some studio stuff, for clean thumpy toms ...think old Police tunes, ELP.
 

Stewart Copeland played Tama drums almost exclusively during his Police days.  While he endorses Remo drums now, Carl Palmer played Ludwigs  with ELP.

Quote:

I like vintage Ludwig for Rock and Roll ...Zepplin


For years, Ludwig was basically the only quality drum maker around so EVERYBODY played them.  

Quote:

Tama is a great kit in the right hands, Toto?


While current drummer Simon Phillips uses Tama, Deceased TOTO drummer and founding member Jeff Porcaro used Ludwigs early on and then endorsed Pearl. Jeff was one of the best drummers in the world!

Quote:


Yamaha made some nice kits, Steely Dan?


There are at least 12 drummers that I know of that have played on record or live with Steely Dan. While I guess some have used Yamaha, Steve gadd who is closely linked to the "Dan" sound used a mishmash of brands in his studio kits. His kits had Pearl Fiberglass drums, Gretch drums, Ludwig drums, and usually featured a Ludwig Supraphonic snare. While he later went on to endorse Yamaha (and still does) what you hear on most of his 1970s-1980s recordings is a mix of brands.

And why cant you play a ballad on a Jaguar?  Does that mean I can only play country music on a telecaster?  I better go tell the boss (Springsteen) to switch!  Smile

Quote:

Most of the DW kits I work with sound just as bad when close mic'd as those shallow shell, no bottom head travel kits. One of the two best sounding kit's I've worked with is a Pacific the guy bought used for a couple hundred bucks.


Pacific is the low end brand of DW.  So not to "tarnish" their high end name, they build their cheaper priced kits under the name Pacific.  

Just goes to show that its not the cost of the kit, its the heads and how you tune it.





Logged
I'm so old, when I was doing FOH for Tommy Dorsey, to balance out the horn section I would slide their chairs downstage and upstage to mix!


Dan Brown

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1450
    • http://www.reachcomm.net
Re: Your Favorite Drums
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2005, 06:04:56 pm »

Craig,
You forgot one thing, "bearing edges"

I do agree however that the tuning of a drum is what makes it genre specific.  Even though drums do have different sounds depending on size which also is somewhat genre specific.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.041 seconds with 21 queries.