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Author Topic: DSP matrix/mixer  (Read 13674 times)

Brian Bolly

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2004, 07:35:46 pm »

If you are a Mackie/EAW dealer, I know that the DX810 can be had for a very reasonable price.  

I have used them in several high-profile installations and while the software GUI can be a little quirky, it works.  There is a decent amount of DSP available, it has RS232 controlability, and can be set up with its own remote control system for much less than an AMX/Crestron control system (albeit not as cool).  

If you want more info, feel free to contact me OB.


-Brian
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Don DeLong

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2004, 11:41:23 pm »

We just installed one of the Mackie DX810 (actually came with RCF badging ironically) in a country club that needed basically background music and paging in 9 zones, plus the ability to input mics (both wired and wireless) into the system amongst various ballrooms, etc.  I was satisfied with the ease of programming it, although the "combine" feature was a bit clutsy to learn, but overall very intuitive.  

One drawback is that all program changes are global, so if you want to change from all the ballrooms playing Muzak, to all the ballrooms having mics hot then all other zones default back to however you saved the preset, e.g. Muzak at a nominal level in most rooms.  This typically wouldn't be a problem except that you are limited to 9 of the remote modules, which can be any combination of volume controls or 4 button programmable pads which can change programs or activate room combinations, etc.  

So, for example, one of the zones in this particular install is a bar.  Behind the bar are 2 of the 9 remote wallplates, a volume control for Muzak, and a volume control for a CD player.  There is a line into the DX810 from a wall mounted plasma screen TV also in the bar, and it is set at a nominal level in the program and the bartender can control its volume with the TV remote control.  No problems so far, but when someone across the building decides to change presets from Muzak to mics in the ballrooms, suddenly the bar goes silent until the bartender turns up the volume control again.  

Other than this somewhat serious limitation, the DX810 sounds good, and has plenty of features at a good price.  

Hope this helps,
Don

 
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wesburgh

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #12 on: August 04, 2004, 06:44:31 pm »

Here's my three cents.  BSS-pricey for your application, great stuff though, networking expandability if you gonna need that in the future.  Same thoughts on Peavey(Arch Acou.) Media Matrix.  Digitool box is not nearly as flexible, and I've already had two on jobs with firmware failures.  Polycom and Gentner(ClearOne) boxes are cumbersome unless you're doing lots of Crestron/AMX control and audio conferencing.  I have no experience with the Allen & Heath or Biamp DSP's.  I've heard A&H should stick to the great consoles they make.  The RANE RPM series is kickin ass in my book so far.  I've put ten or twelve out now and they're all smokin.  Great software interface, tons of DSP power and delay time.  No fromt panel control but they have great little remotes.  Presets are also recallable via contact closure.  They're also bout a grand less than BSS or Peavey usually.  Please email me with any DSP application questions.  It's become a hobby of sorts.
Wes.
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Dexx

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #13 on: September 08, 2004, 03:14:59 pm »

 Shocked I'm Sort of surprised that no one has mentionned Symetrix Symnet(TM). I have found Symetrix products to be an intelligent contribution to the installed sound market at large and Symnet is no exception. It is available in the configuration you are looking for,and there are plenty of peripheral products to make the integration that much easier.The designer software (used to program Symnet is in my opinion more intuitive than Soundweb and Biamp's offering. The architechture is 100% flexible (drag and drop devices and then connect the dots to make the magic happen).

A very important point to mention is that the people at Symetrix actually are listening to the designers and contractors that use their DSP devices and adapt very quickly to the demands placed upon them.

I have used their DSP equipment as well as tons of the contracting stuff and I have never been left holding the bag. Take the time to consider this ... visit www.symetrixaudio.com

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Carey Davies

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #14 on: September 23, 2004, 09:30:16 am »

wesburgh wrote on Wed, 04 August 2004 23:44

Here's my three cents.  (snip) I have no experience with the Allen & Heath or Biamp DSP's.  I've heard A&H should stick to the great consoles they make.  Wes.



mmm... who have you heard that from? We have been in the business of making digital DSP/matrix units for almost 10 years with the DR and more recently the iDR Series. These products are well established and reliable, and the software well advanced to cover the most demanding applications. We are quite excited about the capability and sound of the iDR. I am not aware of any problem with the suitability of these products for their installed sound and system management application. Please let me know if you get specific details on what has been said.
Many thanks,
Carey (A&H design)
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Karl P(eterson)

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2004, 12:40:25 pm »

Personaly, I think you guys make a great DSP System which (IMO) is much more suited for installed sound / system management than other fields such as concert touring or the like.
That being said, (and I have no idea if this is what Wes heard), I have heard many grumbles about your software being complex and sometimes downright difficult to navigate and work with. Its possible that could be part of what Wes is refering to have heard. Remember this was about a year and a halveish ago, so any major changes since then I am not aware of. I haven't heard question of the hardware though - solid stuff methinks.

Karl " 01000100-01101001-01100111-01101001-01110100-01100001-011011 00-00100000-01000010-01100001-01100010-01111001 " P
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Bill Ford

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2004, 11:48:18 am »

Regarding DSP/Matrix controllers Wesburgh wrote:
"Here's my three cents. BSS-pricey for your application, great stuff though, networking expandability if you gonna need that in the future. Same thoughts on Peavey(Arch Acou.) Media Matrix. Digitool box is not nearly as flexible, and I've already had two on jobs with firmware failures. ............. The RANE RPM series.......They're also bout a grand less than BSS or Peavey usually."

As the National Sales Manager for Architectural Acoustics, I'd like to respond by saying that the Architecutral Acoustics Digitool and the MediaMatrix systems are two completly different things. MediaMatrix is often more expensive than the Rane or BiAmp products (depending on the system and capabilities needed), but the Digitool 8x8 DSP is ALWAYS less expensive than the Rane RPM, BiAMp Audia, BSS Soundweb Lite or the MAckie DX 810.

I'm sorry to hear that he had firmware problems with our device and would be happy to replace any unit he has installed that has a problem. We have had many software and firmware upgrades in the two years the units have been in the field, and have sold thousands. The Architecteural Acoustics Digitool is by far the most widely used 8x8 DSP unit on the market for installed systems.
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Phil Ouellette

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2004, 08:39:02 pm »

What do you guys think about the Ashly Protea 24.24M matrix processor? The base 4 x 4 unit lists for $1600 ($1K street price) and is expandable up to a max of 20 x 4 or 4 x 20. Expansion is via 4 channel input or output plug in cards that list for $400 each ($250 street).  So an 8 x 8 version would list for $2400 and have a street price around $1500.

http://www.ashly.com/product/d_matrix.htm

Inputs are switchable between mic preamps (with phantom power) or line level.  Each input has delay, 15 band parametric eq, gate, ducker and autoleveling. Each output is fed from the crosspoint matrix mixer and has HPF, LPF, 15 parametric eq, delay and limiting.

The 24.24M has 35 presets and you can select them using contact closure inputs or through the data port.  Ashly has 3 different wall mount remotes: One with dual volume controls, one with 4 preset select buttons and a programmable unit that lets you control volume, scroll through the presets, control input/output gain, etc.

http://www.ashly.com/product/d_acc.htm

I've used the Protea 4.24C processor in portable systems and really like it.  The 24.24M looks like a very interesting option for permanent installs.  Has anybody tried this model yet?

Phil
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CAD Services

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #18 on: April 11, 2005, 06:51:38 am »

Phil,

I noticed your location is Spartanburg, if that is Spartanburg SC, than a 24.24M install is close by.

We have a 24.24M in the new Summit Pointe, I would be happy to show it to you.

Paul Mattson (864)576-4138 Ext 211
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air-geko

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Re: DSP matrix/mixer
« Reply #19 on: April 11, 2005, 02:41:45 pm »

I would strongly suggest Symetrix Symnet.  The software is clear and easy to both design and use, and the support is excellent.  Check it out, you'll like what you see!

Keith

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