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Author Topic: Few Questions - Aluminum Price & When To Turn Down  (Read 2578 times)

Josh Billings

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Few Questions - Aluminum Price & When To Turn Down
« on: July 21, 2004, 08:35:22 am »

I just finished my labs & i love them. They give me a really EAW sound & feel. They fill the room gloriously and are just effing perfect.

I am running QSC RMX2450s to them and am wondering if the amp is too much too little, or just right. Basically can i run them to clip or is that too much?

I want to basically run them just until the amp clips then back em off and limit them so they don't go any higher and bring down the volume accordingly.

part 2, i've been using wood and we accidentally made them w/ 16"x16" panels and there were big holes that needed to be filles w/ foam (Should i use wood putty for that? Or cut pieces of 1/2" birch to fill those areas w/??

Oh back to part 2's question...

Aluminum? Where can i get it 1/4" thick and cut & drilled? How much will it cost me. The 1/4" wood i have now sucks, it bends too much when the sub hits you know. Not rigid enough.

-Josh
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Al Limberg

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Re: Few Questions - Aluminum Price & When To Turn Down
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2004, 09:13:14 am »

Hi Josh,
You should be able to find aluminum by looking up 'aluminum', 'aluminum fabricators', or 'metal specialties' in your yellow pages.  I've found the price to vary quite a bit from supplier to supplier so make some phone calls.  Also be aware that the price of aluminum and steel has risen dramaticly in the last 6-9 months- nearly doubled here in mid-Michigan.  I bought a full 4'x10'sheet last time and split it with a friend who was building some Labs too.  We were able to get 21 16" squares at the price of 8 if they had been cut by the supplier.
Of course the fact that my friend had access to an 8' 'metal break' sure helped but you can cut it with a skil saw or table saw  - just put the blade on backward to prevent so much shrapnel and wear good eye protection and long sleeves and gloves!

As far as patching holes,  I'm not sure exactly how you ended up with them. Do you mean you actually cut 16" square holes in the 45"x45" sides over the module area??  The simplest way to make the module access holes is to mount the module in place in the partial box (1 45"x45" side, both 45"x21" sides, the 43 1/2"x21" back) then use a router with a 'follow bit' to make a hole that precisely follows the module's INSIDE walls on three sides.  I find that extending the sides outward 11" from the rear leaves adequate room to load the driver and plenty of overlap to cover the hole with  16" square panel. (I made a jig the proper size to route a 16" square recess 5/16" deep for the panel to mount in.)  That's fine for the future - for the present problem - you need to  fill your existing holes evidently.  I highly recommend West Epoxy and their 'filleting powder' - you can mix the powder with the epoxy base and hardener to create a much thicker consistency to fill cracks and small holes - you will be best served to fill larger holes with wood shims first then seal and strengthen them with the West.

Finally, you don't mention how you were running your RMX2450 - I have run one on my subs once - running one sub on each channel(3 ohms per channel) it was definitely not enough power.  Running one driver per channel also was not satisfactory.  I did not try running it bridged as it isn't recommended for that set-up long term.  I have on the other hand gotten satisfactory results using an 1850HD bridged into a single cabinet.

HTH,
Al
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Tom Herr

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Re: Few Questions - Aluminum Price & When To Turn Down
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2004, 09:10:37 am »

Hi Al
With all do respect,  In response to the RMX2450. I run one per labhorn bridged show after show with no problems, and they don't seem to run hot. Prior to doing this I had read posts about the RMX2450 and many have implied it was not built to handle 4ohms bridged so I  contacted QSC, Their response "knock yourself out". I suggest you contact QSC and get the word directly from them. If they tell you different, I would like to know.

In all fairness the shows I do are not all high level Rock, I do a variety of shows from out door, chest pounding Rock to dance groups at wedding receptions, horn sections, Jazz what ever. So my RMX2450's may be running bridged at 4 ohms and do sometimes see a good work out about 50% of the time they are running at low level. And time will tell if the 2450's  hold up, but for over a year they have been doing fine.


Josh  If you are running them bridged one per labhorn I would be surprised if you run into the clip lights very often.   I have never seen a clip light on my RMX2450's at a show.  If you are  running them stereo I agree with Al, you are not giving them enough power.

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Josh Billings

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Re: Few Questions - Aluminum Price & When To Turn Down
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2004, 01:14:18 am »

I'm running them bridge mono 1 for each cabinet.

I can't hear distortion, but i'm only using 2 and I'm just wondering how much juice i can feed them.

How will i know when i'm giving them too much??

Also, what kind of paint should i use? I tried spray painting them...bad idea (10 cans later and still not a good finish.

-Josh
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Mike MacWillie

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Re: Few Questions - Aluminum Price & When To Turn Down
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2004, 02:19:53 am »

I like to do the outside of cabinets I build with Rubberized truck bed lining.  Looks good, and stands up to abuse. Smile
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