ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down

Author Topic: Wiring Balanced Cables  (Read 4222 times)

Tom Roche

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 55
Wiring Balanced Cables
« on: April 26, 2004, 10:02:36 pm »

I'm getting conflicting advice for the proper wiring of cables that have TRS 1/4" on one end and XLR connectors on the other end.  I was told the tip goes to pin 3, ring to pin 2, and sleeve to pin 1.  Is this correct?  It's for an aux send to an amp.  Thanks,

Tom
Logged

Baron Gray

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 462
Re: Wiring Balanced Cables
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2004, 10:29:36 pm »

Hi Tom

Well....yes....and no.

"Pin 1 ground, pin two hot, pin three not" is the norm but they use a different standard in some equipment so the best way is to download the manuals for your desk and amp and just make sure. Also make sure that your aux sends are balanced.

You could also use a phase checker to bell it out and if you didn't buy the gear new this would be preferable as you don't know who has been "under the hood".

Baron
Logged
See, you can't rewrite, 'cause to rewrite is to deceive and lie, and you betray your own thoughts. To rethink the flow and the rhythm, the tumbling out of the words, is a betrayal, and it's a sin, Martin, it's a sin.

Hank from the 'Naked Lunch'

John Roberts {JR}

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 0
Re: Wiring Balanced Cables
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2004, 10:29:40 pm »

Tom R. wrote on Mon, 26 April 2004 21:02

I'm getting conflicting advice for the proper wiring of cables that have TRS 1/4" on one end and XLR connectors on the other end.  I was told the tip goes to pin 3, ring to pin 2, and sleeve to pin 1.  Is this correct?  It's for an aux send to an amp.  Thanks,

Tom


Ironically the TRS connector may easier to call than the XLR.

"Most" TRS will be wired Tip=+, Ring=-, Sleve=Gnd. The IEC and AES specs for XLR are pin 2=+, pin 3=-, pin 1-gnd.

However there are some manufacturers who have been around since before the standards were enacted or have some other good (I'm sure) reason. So some manufacturer's will use pin 3=+, pin 2=-. Everybody pretty much agrees that pin 1 is ground.

I try to silk screen a legend somewhere on the chassis with the wiring approach I used in that product, and manufacturer's should at least tell you "how" they're interfacing. If not call them at home, late at night... Very Happy

JR

Logged
 https://www.resotune.com/


Tune it, or don't play it...
-----

ThomasA(lbenberger)

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 208
Re: Wiring Balanced Cables
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2004, 10:33:49 pm »

Hi Tom!

That's not correct in most cases. Usual wiring on an XLR is

Pin1: Ground
Pin2: Hot
Pin3: Cold

and on a TRS

Tip: Hot
Ring: Cold
Sleeve: Ground

So Tip->Pin2, Ring->Pin3 and Sleeve->Pin1 would be right.

Mind you these are just the standards and the situation might differ for your brand of mixer or amp, although this is very unlikely to be the case. Check the manual to be sure, and also check that you really have a balanced Aux Output on your mixer.

ThomasA

PS: If you are unsure about wiring of cables, for instance Mackie includes wiring schemes for the most common adapter cables in their downloadable manuals!
Logged
******************************
Thomas Albenberger

Lee Patzius

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1851
XLR pins 1-2-3 MY favorite mnemonic I learned on LAB.
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2004, 11:34:14 pm »

I remember awhile back someone posted an easy to remember 1,2,3, pin assignment for XLR's.

Assign pins 1,2,3, in the same order as X,L,R.

Then you can remember the following:

X for eXternal shield = pin 1
L for Line out (hot or +) = pin 2
R for Return (cold or -) = pin 3

That's the way I remembered it.
Logged
Lee Patzius

 

Alex_C

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 162
Re: Wiring Balanced Cables
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2004, 06:19:56 am »

A little off topic, but...

About a year ago, I bought some real cheap XLR cables from a guy that just couldn't sell them -
Logged

Tom Roche

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 55
Thank You Everyone
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2004, 08:51:35 pm »

Thanks for the info....I suspected something wasn't right when I compared the earlier given advice to a vague diagram I had.  Oh well, the good news is I have only two cables to fix and easy access to the snake.  Thanks again,

Tom
Logged

Brent Handy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 202
    • http://www.projectdamagecontrol.com/ha_recording.htm
XLR = stereo
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2004, 09:40:07 am »

The XLR connector was originally a stereo connector, hence the L, for Left and the R for Return.  Not everyone follows pin 2 hot (BSS, Hill, etc, etc)
Logged

Brent Handy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 202
    • http://www.projectdamagecontrol.com/ha_recording.htm
Mackie has it backwards
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2004, 09:42:02 am »

If you own the original CR1604's, they wired the auxes backwards.  So, don't look at that manual.
Logged

Dave Dermont

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2011
    • http://www.geocities.com/livesound101/
Re: XLR = stereo...No, not really
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2004, 10:57:06 am »

Brent wrote on Wed, 28 April 2004 08:40

The XLR connector was originally a stereo connector, hence the L, for Left and the R for Return.  Not everyone follows pin 2 hot (BSS, Hill, etc, etc)


This certainly sounds reasonable, but it's untrue.

XLR was originally a registered trademark of ITT Cannon. It has since become a generic audio term.

X is the connector series
L means that it has a Latch
R means the center insert is Rubber

See the Rane Audio Reference page for more info.
Logged
Dave Dermont - Chief Lizard, LAB Lounge

WARNING: Dates In Calendar May Be Closer Than They Appear
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
 

Page created in 0.05 seconds with 19 queries.