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Author Topic: Tools needed to build Lab Sub  (Read 4787 times)

Gordon Ryan

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Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« on: October 13, 2011, 06:47:22 pm »

For anyone who has built a Lab Sub.
What tools are needed?
Saw types, planers, etc.
Thanks.
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duane massey

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Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2011, 06:58:09 pm »

I've built a lot of cabinets (not including Labs) with a table saw, jigsaw, router, and drill. I also have a panel saw, but that's an extravagance for most DIY'ers. I use screws, but you can use clamps and nail guns if desired.
I'm sure there are tools others will prefer.
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Duane Massey
Technician, musician, stubborn old guy
Houston, Texas

g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2011, 11:14:31 pm »

For anyone who has built a Lab Sub.
What tools are needed?
Saw types, planers, etc.
Thanks.

I found it!!!!  Never thought I'd be able to remember who posted these sub-build pics, but here are some great ones that LJ posted of his sub cabs:

http://srforums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/t/61891/0/

Not Labs, I know, but great pictures of some solid construction with "screw and glue".
« Last Edit: October 14, 2011, 12:38:32 am by dick rees »
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Tom Young

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Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2011, 08:51:17 am »

I've built a lot of cabinets (not including Labs) with a table saw, jigsaw, router, and drill. I also have a panel saw, but that's an extravagance for most DIY'ers. I use screws, but you can use clamps and nail guns if desired.
I'm sure there are tools others will prefer.

I would add a belt sander and table saw extensions.
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Tom Young
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Gordon Ryan

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Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2011, 10:26:33 am »

I would add a belt sander and table saw extensions.

Thanks for the input.
Would you guys recommend using mdf to learn on, until I get the hang of it?...
OR just buy a couple of JTR Growlers?
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duane massey

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Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2011, 07:23:39 pm »

Depends upon your carpentry skills and your goals.
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Duane Massey
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Houston, Texas

danfowler

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Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2011, 07:11:01 pm »

If you're mentally prepared grasshopper:

Physically you will have to have:

1st priority-A 3 hp to 5 hp 10" table saw with large extensions (some squaring cuts can be 45")
                with a long out-feed table or rollers. Some of this depends on if you're using 4x8           
                material. Some guys can only find the 5x5 metric. I live in NC and you can find
                anything woodworking here. The 4x8 size is so efficient on the cut-list I can get 1
               cabinet out of 2.5 sheets. Some of my module parts (speaker baffles) are 1/2" 9 ply.
                You will have to tune this saw up (look up on the internet) and I'd highly   
                suggest a new blade (minimum 60 tooth) to capitalize on the tuneup. A Forrest is
               best, but a Freud, Amana, or Oldham will do. Don't scrimp on the blade or the saw
               unless you are really skilled. You want to make sure the blade stop is absolutely 90         
               degrees and the toe-in/toe-out on the fence is perfect. The blade can NOT bind
               or burn the material in any way.
              Glue adhesion will not do well at all if the cut isn't clean,no matter what glue you use.
               
               Read up on that on the web on a woodworking forum. It's eye opening.

               I'm not saying it can't be done on lesser equipment, it absolutely can. You just need
                to know up front that there WILL be compromise/errors on lesser machinery.
                I've been doing woodworking since I was 14 and learned all this the hard way.
                You don't want to belt sand edges of hardwood plywood to get burns out of a cut.
               
                If you're not into making a bunch of jigs, buy or build a taper cutting jig.
                Look up NewWoodworker.com. This stuff is really common sense, but table saws 
                are plainly dangerous, and the taper cuts are more dangerous.
                They will show you how to build one, or do what I did, and buy an
                aluminum one from Woodworker Supply. You might want too buy 2 of them.
                Here's why:
                The taper cuts are complicated by the fact they must be done mirror-image (one
                cut on the right/one on the left) of the blade to keep the jig(s) set to the same angle
                doing these module parts. Those cuts are the most critical and have to be the same
                so that the module assembles square. If you have 2 taper jigs you can set them up
                easily by stacking them. A Biesemeyer fence is a beautiful thing on these taper cuts
                because of it's accuracy left and right of the blade. Back to that "lesser equipment"
                thing again....................
                One taper jig can do left, one can do right of the blade. Hard to explain in words,
                but when you have the parts in front of you laying on the saw table, it's crystal
                clear. Some parts can't be flipped over to reverse the cut, trust me. The "up"
                side must stay "up" on all it's cuts.               

2nd Priority- 3 hp router with 1/2" bits. A circle cutting attachment is needed as well. Hardwood
                  plywood is tough stuff and new double edge bits are nice and vibration free. You'll
                  need a straight plunge cutting bit, a flush trim bit to trim excess panel, and a
                  round over bit to finish the edges.

3rd Priority- an air stapler (1/4") and a screw gun. Mileage may vary here. A 1/2" staple gun
                 will only do 1.5" L staples in hardwood ply, the 2" staples can't go the distance and
                 won't drive flush. The 1/4" staple will fasten the panel so you can pre-drill the holes
                 and sink the screws to do the final panel pull up. I found the staples wouldn't pull
                 the large panels up at all. Since I used Gorilla Glue (urethane) the fastener had to
                 resist the glue expansion (and I built these by myself) so the screws made perfect
                 sense. Don't use drywall screws, they break in hardwood. Use steel deck screws.
                 Definitely drill a pilot hole for every screw, BTW, this will require a drill. AND, don't
                 use the drill to drive the screws, use a screw gun. Screw guns have a clutch.
                 Very important when these torque values are at play. Lot of torque on those
                 screws. Make sure to drive them below the surface too. When you pass the
                 router over with the round-over bit, the bit won't hit the screw head and shower
                 you with carbide and steel shards. Don't ask me how I know that...................

4th priority- A LARGE workspace helps. It's not essential, but you will want to build 4 of
                 these at a time. They take up a lot of room. It took over half of my 24 x 40 ft.
                 shop. To keep your workflow streamlined, you'll want to lay the parts out in a
                 "build order" to make things faster and less confusing during assembly.

There are odds and ends you will need. If you do your own aluminum plates you'll need a metal
capable jig saw (variable speed). A 4'x4'x2' tall work table is really handy because you have to work fast when that glue is setting. You'll find that out really quick if you use urethane. That stuff really sets up fast in the summer months. A belt sander helps in the final stages too.
You will find the module requires the most precision to build but the panels are small and easily
handled. You can staple that together and get away with it. Just remember, ANY shortcuts made early on equal BIG headaches in final assembly.

My assembly method (and this is hyper important) was start from the center and dry fit the upper and back flare parts. That will locate the module precisely, then attach the module to one of the sides. Then work the flares from the module out and down to the largest flare. That pushes any tolerances from the small panels to the big panels as you work. and there will be tolerances.
I didn't even final cut the bottom center brace until the box was pretty much 90% done.
My box was the Peter Sylvester (45's on the back) design because I move them everywhere. That design really is sweet because these things are HEAVY. Took me 2 weeks to build
4 LABs. 2 weeks of intense concentration and paying strict attention, this is not a project for
the timid among us. Be mentally prepared and don't allow outside distractions.

Let me tell you though, when you have 16 of them in an Arena (end firing 8 per side), and you push that sub aux up, the room just trembles with an 808 drop..................oh yeah!!!!!!!!!!!!

make that dust,
later,
Dan 0;)

« Last Edit: November 13, 2011, 04:48:04 pm by danfowler »
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Jon Geissinger

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Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2011, 08:49:57 am »

Build the LAB only if you are good at woodworking.  Build some CUBOs first if you are not good at woodworking.  The internals of the LAB are complex just to visualize.

Use Plywood; no MDF, MDF is much denser and heavier.

You can get the Aluminum plates made locally, either circles or the shape of the inside baffle.  OR get them made online.  I cut my first with a circle cutter and a 3HP router, took 1.5 hours each.

Make your labs with the rear corners cut off!  Put castors in the bottom corner cutoff and larger handle(s) on the top cutoff.

Use Gorilla Glue, it seals while gluing.  White glue will work just as well, but it will not hide any cutting/fitting mistakes.  Screws are not required; when the glue sets it will hold better than the wood (like welding).  The only place that needs to be sealed is the two enclosures for the speakers/drivers.
As stated before, assemble inside to outside; DRY fit everything before getting out the glue and screws. 

Ensure that right angles are exact.

Cleanup the holes/divits, etc. with Bondo, used gloves when applying and WORK FAST.  Wood dough takes longer to set, bondo can be worked within several hours.  Bondo is better when trying to cover up a mistake.

Primer paint everything, inside and out!  I paint internal pieces before assembling and leave the gluing areas unpainted (tape them).  Mold and mildew will not grow as fast on painted surfaces (internally). Paint the mouth section up to the point where you will not be able to see it any more when fully assembled with flat black paint, don't use spray paint, messy, wasteful and it stinks. 

You can buy flat black latex just like any other paint in a can.

When the enclosure is completed and primered, go to the automotive store and get bedliner paint.  I choose black.  Apply per it's instructions and do it outside, this stuff stinks too.

That's my quick and dirty for speaker building, with specific instructions for the Lab.

One of the days, I intend on trying to build a composite enclosure (like manufacturers do all the time now) using something like paper honey comb with fiberglass, might be lighter; remains to be seen.

Tools required to build any speaker box:
Circular saw (Skill is my favorite, but that is an opinion)
Scroll/Saber saw for cutting holes
Drill
Belt sander
Basic hand tools
Framing square

Nice to have:
Table saw
Router
Battery drill
Hole cutting jig for the router to cut round holes
Long reach panel clamps
Drywall square

Really nice to have:
Panel saw
Large work surface
Finish router
Upcut or down cut spiral bits for the router as well as straight cut

Materials required:
3/4 BC plywood
Glue
#8 1-1/2" wood screws with philips head
#10 1-1/2" wood screws with philips head
Some type of wood filler
Paintable caulk
Primer paint
Finish paint

Nice to have materials:
Baltic Birch 13 ply plywood (does not come in 4' X 8' panels, but in metric sized panels)
Epoxy type glue
Bondo body filler
Bed liner paint

Baltic birch is the best you can do and takes more of a beating.  If you are building something that will not be moved often, then use BC.  Furniture grade for inside the house is in another class of woodworking all together.

Don't use RTV type sealants, they don't paint and are not really required.

I've used porch paint on some enclosures, it's tough but comes on limited colors.  I have not yet tried garage floor paint because I fear that it will not be flexible enough.

I guess I've exceeded my BS factor here; every woodworker has an opinion.  My concept (in life) is work smarter, not harder.  The whole point of these ventures it to have fun; if it isn't fun, don't do it.  Someone else who considers it to be fun will do it for you.
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Gordon Ryan

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Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2011, 12:55:18 pm »

Thanks for the info.
Looks like it'll be a while before I tackle this project.
Not enough tools and no space to really roll it out.
I took woodworking in high school, but that was years ago.
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ProSoundWeb Community

Re: Tools needed to build Lab Sub
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2011, 12:55:18 pm »


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