ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: electric shock from IEM's  (Read 4547 times)

Martin Hamer

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
electric shock from IEM's
« on: August 04, 2011, 05:44:49 pm »

Hi Guys

I've been working on a ship for the past two weeks as a keyboard player. For the past two nights I have started getting a small to mild electric shock through my earbuds (iem's) about three times per show. We use Aviom (connected via CAT5) personal monitoring systems, and none of the rest of the band has experienced this.


Does anyone have any thoughts as to what is causing this? Is it a fault with my headphones or an issue with the power supply? Is there a fix such as adding something between the Aviom and my headphones to avoid the shock?

Thanks for your help

Martin
« Last Edit: December 23, 2011, 05:50:12 pm by Martin Hamer »
Logged

Stu McDoniel

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1144
  • Central Wisconsin...USA
Re: electric shock from IEM's
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2011, 09:11:00 pm »

Hi Guys

I've been working on a cruise ship for the past two weeks as a keyboard player. For the past two nights I have started getting a small to mild electric shock through my earbuds (iem's) about three times per show. We use Aviom (connected via CAT5) personal monitoring systems, and none of the rest of the band has experienced this.

Unfortunately the sound engineer's solution is for me to change headphones, which as my current ones are custom isn't exactly a solution!

Does anyone have any thoughts as to what is causing this? Is it a fault with my headphones or an issue with the power supply? Is there a fix such as adding something between the Aviom and my headphones to avoid the shock?

Thanks for your help

Martin
Ok excuse me if im wrong here but I looked up those ear buds and they are rubber?
This is nearly impossible to get a shock through rubber?  Are you sure you are not getting a shock
between your keboard chasis and the a microphone?  Are you singing through a mic? 
If so try using a foam windscreen.  This seems a bit strange for you to be getting periodic
shocks through the ear buds.. however,  getting shocks of any kind here and there indicates
a faulty piece of gear.  I have heard of getting shocks every time the lips touch the microphone
which leads to another issue.  Plug a 1/8 stereo pin jack with bare wires out into your output (normally where you plug your ear buds into) and test for voltage issues with an Ohm volt meter. 
Your gonna have to go down in the afternoon and work with the sound tech on this.  If he dosnt
have the knowledge to test this then...they need a "new guy" 
Logged

Martin Hamer

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Re: electric shock from IEM's
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2011, 08:29:25 am »

Ok excuse me if im wrong here but I looked up those ear buds and they are rubber?
This is nearly impossible to get a shock through rubber?  Are you sure you are not getting a shock
between your keboard chasis and the a microphone?  Are you singing through a mic? 
If so try using a foam windscreen.  This seems a bit strange for you to be getting periodic
shocks through the ear buds.. however,  getting shocks of any kind here and there indicates
a faulty piece of gear.  I have heard of getting shocks every time the lips touch the microphone
which leads to another issue.  Plug a 1/8 stereo pin jack with bare wires out into your output (normally where you plug your ear buds into) and test for voltage issues with an Ohm volt meter. 
Your gonna have to go down in the afternoon and work with the sound tech on this.  If he dosnt
have the knowledge to test this then...they need a "new guy"

Ok just to clarify the monitoring system is the Aviom (a small mixer unit that sits next to every musician and allows us to control our own personal mix).

My headphones that I plug into the Aviom are Sleek Audio SA-1's with custom moulds fitted to them. The moulds are obviously rubber but the headphones they attach to have some metal on them.

I'm not using a microphone (although the setup consists of piano, bass, drums, guitar, 4 horns and 4 singers, plus click + track. This is all accessible to me through the aviom so I get a signal from everything).
Logged

Mike Christy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 689
  • Southern Maine
Re: electric shock from IEM's
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2011, 09:19:23 am »

Ok just to clarify the monitoring system is the Aviom (a small mixer unit that sits next to every musician and allows us to control our own personal mix).

My headphones that I plug into the Aviom are Sleek Audio SA-1's with custom moulds fitted to them. The moulds are obviously rubber but the headphones they attach to have some metal on them.

I'm not using a microphone (although the setup consists of piano, bass, drums, guitar, 4 horns and 4 singers, plus click + track. This is all accessible to me through the aviom so I get a signal from everything).

Hi Martin, Does the shock only happen when, for example you touch a metal part of the keyboard? I just recently fixed a Roland keyboard that had the power transformer become dismounted in the the case (the screws backed out) )and was basically floating around in there, shorting out transformer terminals to the metal case.

Additionally, being on a ship I assume you are all on the same power, and are not using ground lifts?

Another thought... it isnt ESD, is it?

Mike
« Last Edit: August 11, 2011, 09:32:57 am by Mike Christy »
Logged

Karl Maciag

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 33
Re: electric shock from IEM's
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2012, 02:42:57 pm »

I've had this same issue with the metal part of my IEM shocking me while hardwired into an Aviom mixer, as the rest of my band has as well.  We put some gaff over the metal parts that touch our ears,  and that worked.  It's happened at several different venues, with different Aviom hardware.  I believe the problem has happened with power coming from the local power supply for the mixer, and also the pro distribution hub that powers the mixer as well. 
Logged

Mike Hicks

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
Re: electric shock from IEM's
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2012, 06:17:55 pm »

I've had this same issue with the metal part of my IEM shocking me while hardwired into an Aviom mixer, as the rest of my band has as well.  We put some gaff over the metal parts that touch our ears,  and that worked.  It's happened at several different venues, with different Aviom hardware.  I believe the problem has happened with power coming from the local power supply for the mixer, and also the pro distribution hub that powers the mixer as well.

I am also having the same issue and haven't been able to track it down.  It happens every few minutes and doesn't seem to be related to anything i'm doing at the time (i.e. playing ac gtr and singing through a wireless mic).  I am using an L.R. Baggs para d.i. with phantom power on but other members are experiencing the same thing regardless what they are playing.  We are using an LS9 32 console equipped with an Aviom card.  The signal is then fed to the pro distributor and, of course, fed to the personal mixers.  We are all also using headphone extenders.  I have contacted Aviom support but they had no answers as to why this would be happening. 
Logged

John Livings

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 351
  • Los Angeles, California
Re: electric shock from IEM's
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2012, 09:45:51 pm »

Hi All,

I have not used the Aviom, However I would guess that one or more pieces of equipment is "energized" meaning a short is present and you get shocked when you complete the circuit.

An easy check would be to use a multi-meter and place one probe on the metal part of the headset and the other probe to a ground.

Observe any voltage, If found, start the process of elimination starting with turning off the Aviom and repeat the volt check.

Remove the Aviom from the rack (If it is racked) and try again.

Try a different cord, plug, receptacle.....

If gear is racked, almost any piece of gear in the rack could be the cause, as all of the pieces are connected through the
metal rack rails, Metal screws and Metal cases on all the equipment.

There are other methods to track down the voltage leak, if you feel uncomfortable doing any of this testing, Have a qualified person walk you through this a few times.

While I don't encourage anyone unqualified working with electricity, We all must exhibit a basic knowledge to even "Plug" a piece of equipment into the wall, distro or from one piece of equipment to another.

Please post back when you find a solution to your Issues.

Regards,  John

 
Logged

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: electric shock from IEM's
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2012, 09:45:51 pm »


Pages: [1]   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.027 seconds with 18 queries.