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Author Topic: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do  (Read 11131 times)

Jordan Wolf

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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2011, 03:22:09 am »

I see big blue sparks in your future.  That's not good.
+1

As soon as I saw "main breaker" and "15A plug" I was worried.

To the OP: you need to get a much better grasp on electrical standards and safety.
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Jordan Wolf
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Fernando Lopez

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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2011, 01:16:25 pm »

Update:

Thanks to eveyone who contributed in this thread. It made me realized I had to get a grasp on electricity and safety. It is a work in progress, so far

1) I learned how to connect to a main panel, have all my cables and testers, including testers to check if a cable is wrongly connected. Also got some plugs which are used in some venues here.

2) Got new distro boxes and 8 gauge cables, which I know will have to upgrade, but it is wayyy better than what I had before


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Fernando Lopez

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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2011, 01:18:14 pm »

more pics
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John Livings

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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2011, 02:03:41 pm »


"Thanks to eveyone who contributed in this thread. It made me realized I had to get a grasp on electricity and safety. It is a work in progress"

This is good news, Going to a strange Venue and being able to "SAFELY" obtain Power, Allows one to get jobs they might  otherwise have to pass on.

Keep your Electricians Phone number handy, Just in case.

Regards,  John

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Bob Lee

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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2011, 05:20:56 pm »

With a Load you should have been More than the 15 amps, Lower voltage= Higher Amps (With the same load).

That's not correct (unless the voltage regulator is already in the circuit or the devices have certain types of auto-ranging power supplies).

Without those exceptions, lower voltage will generally result in lower current draw.
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Bob Lee
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John Livings

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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
« Reply #25 on: July 28, 2011, 08:01:54 pm »

That's not correct (unless the voltage regulator is already in the circuit or the devices have certain types of auto-ranging power supplies).

Without those exceptions, lower voltage will generally result in lower current draw.

Hi Bob,

I tried to be as clear as possible, If the Load remains or tries to remain the same, As it would try to do in most "Inductive Loads"  The Amperage would first increase, and as the voltage continued to drop, At some point the amperage would drop due to an open winding, Klixon or breaker tripping.

On a "Resistive Load" such as some lights and many other things, As the Voltage Drops, the Amperage will also Drop as it is Not trying to support the Optimal Load, The lights are just dimming.

While your Rack may not support many Inductive Loads, The Venue does. They include Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, Coolers, Ice Machines, Fans and other things.

This creates its own issues, as you are plugged into the Main Power somehow (with dropping voltage).

I know you already knew this, I should have been more clear about the the Load remaining at 1500 Watts, Not dropping.

Also Thanks for dropping into the forums, I have gotten great information from your posts here and on the QSC board.

Regards,  John
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Todd Black

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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2011, 11:39:05 am »

Update:

Thanks to eveyone who contributed in this thread. It made me realized I had to get a grasp on electricity and safety. It is a work in progress, so far

1) I learned how to connect to a main panel, have all my cables and testers, including testers to check if a cable is wrongly connected. Also got some plugs which are used in some venues here.

2) Got new distro boxes and 8 gauge cables, which I know will have to upgrade, but it is wayyy better than what I had before




be aware, that setup is not code complant. Ignoring the home made distro for a minute mini cams basically cannot be legally used (there is one scenario where theyre ok but it doesnt apply here) because the smallest single cable conductor allowed is #2. The other issue is that SO cord may not be 'fanned out' like that -the cable jacket must terminate into a connector. You should have used 50 amp CS twistlocks here and it might have been cheaper than the mini-cam.

now onto the distro. Where is the overcurrent protection? I see four flange mount receptacles, and 2 poles worth of (what looks like) SQD QOU breaker and a whole bunch of wires going to the cams so its clear there is no overcurrent protection for some of these receptacles. What is the white wire going to the green cam?

Most importantly it appears as though the box is not bonded. If its not already there install a wire from the green can to the box (and grind off some paint so you have a good surface contact) and jumper from the box to the hinged lid. Do this immediately, its pretty dangerous if the box is not bonded.

I dont mean to beat you up over your new gear, just trying to show you whats wrong. Whoever put this together for you did you a disservice.
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Bob Lee

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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2011, 07:52:30 pm »

I tried to be as clear as possible, If the Load remains or tries to remain the same, As it would try to do in most "Inductive Loads"  The Amperage would first increase, and as the voltage continued to drop, At some point the amperage would drop due to an open winding, Klixon or breaker tripping.

On a "Resistive Load" such as some lights and many other things, As the Voltage Drops, the Amperage will also Drop as it is Not trying to support the Optimal Load, The lights are just dimming.

You're talking about a synchronous AC motor load, not an "inductive load." You can't present that as an example of other load types such as audio equipment.

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Bob Lee
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Re: Voltage from 95 to 104v - what to do
¬ę Reply #27 on: August 02, 2011, 07:52:30 pm ¬Ľ


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