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Need recommendation on schools for audio education

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Mark Yester:
Hello - my son is entering his senior year of high school and is interested in music production/audio technology education. Anyone have any thoughts on what avenues of education are good?

g'bye, Dick Rees:

--- Quote from: markyester on June 27, 2011, 01:33:54 PM ---Hello - my son is entering his senior year of high school and is interested in music production/audio technology education. Anyone have any thoughts on what avenues of education are good?

--- End quote ---

UHK:  The School of Hard Knocks.

Think apprenticeship.  Learn by doing.  You can pay tens of thousands of $$$/year for theory and feel-good courses OR if he's serious, hook him up with a business doing what he wants to do and let him get the hands on experience by participating in the environment.

Better to learn practical skills along the way than trying to get them after the fact......and after spending a lot of $$$$$.  When hiring time comes, experience trumps paper.  And a referral from someone for whom you've worked for a few years trumps a professorial endorsement.

That's my opinion.

Corbin Prosche:
IATSE or find your local stagehand company. I learned so much from working with different rigs. Plus you meet touring guys who you work hard for, they do see that...

Jordan Wolf:

--- Quote from: markyester on June 27, 2011, 01:33:54 PM ---Hello - my son is entering his senior year of high school and is interested in music production/audio technology education. Anyone have any thoughts on what avenues of education are good?

--- End quote ---
If that's the case, it may be good to wait on higher education for a little while so that he can get an experience in the event production field.  Working hard, long hours for little pay and no recognition shows a real passion for doing something you love.  If he's set on you want to really help him, get him some gear: a pair of appropriately-sized goatskin work gloves, steel-toe boots (black preferable), and a "roadie toolkit" - multitool, small flashlight, and an 8" crescent wrench on a tether.  That should cover the basics (anything else should be provided if he's starting out, anyway).

If, after that time, he decides to stick with it, then further education may be something to look into.  All of the people I have worked with that went to school specifically for audio have said the same thing: it is what you make of it.  Many schools have tons of lab time - students can stay and tinker/ask questions or leave to do other stuff.  I would look at a education that specific as a time for him to gain experience with equipment that he otherwise would not have the means to.  From there, it's up to him.

All the best,


Jordan Wolf

P.S. - I would recommend posting your location.  There are people from all over the world on this forum and if anyone is near you, I am almost certain that they would love to help you and your son out.

Sam Zuckerman:
Just have him get out there and do it. I really got into the business by working on my high school's theater productions. Nothing like being tossed behind 10 wireless mics, amateur vocalists no processing and a reverberant room prone to feedback in order to learn.

Does he do anything production oriented now? Any experience?

Also, why isn't he asking. It doesn't say much about him having the parent ask. I work at a student union and it being orientation season we get a lot of parents walking up asking to give they son/daughter a job. We usually wave them on but if an incoming freshman comes and ask we usually give them a tour on the spot and ask them to come back after they have their first semester grades.

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