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Author Topic: bass guitar boomy  (Read 12150 times)

thomas jones

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bass guitar boomy
« on: June 18, 2011, 11:06:18 am »

My sound is great at rehearsal Thru 1x15 & 1X12 cabs. At the gig I run those and a line out of pre-amp to FOH. At most if not all venues my baseline settings need to be adjusted. EQ'ing less lows and low mids both for stage and FOH. Any ideas?
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g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2011, 11:10:43 am »

My sound is great at rehearsal Thru 1x15 & 1X12 cabs. At the gig I run those and a line out of pre-amp to FOH. At most if not all venues my baseline settings need to be adjusted. EQ'ing less lows and low mids both for stage and FOH. Any ideas?

You're accustomed to your sound in a rehearsal situation.  It's not going to sound like that to you on stage in a larger room w/subs.  Trust the sound guy to make it good for the room and learn to get along with it.  At FOH I like to have a "dry" input from a DI between the bass and anything else so I can deal with the content of the bass sound independent of the bassist tweaking his rig to sound right to him on stage.
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Marsellus Fariss

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2011, 03:06:14 pm »

My sound is great at rehearsal Thru 1x15 & 1X12 cabs. At the gig I run those and a line out of pre-amp to FOH. At most if not all venues my baseline settings need to be adjusted. EQ'ing less lows and low mids both for stage and FOH. Any ideas?

You're accustomed to your sound in a rehearsal situation.  It's not going to sound like that to you on stage in a larger room w/subs.  Trust the sound guy to make it good for the room and learn to get along with it.  At FOH I like to have a "dry" input from a DI between the bass and anything else so I can deal with the content of the bass sound independent of the bassist tweaking his rig to sound right to him on stage.

Cause often Bass rigs have crappy DI's that sound bad, buzz, or break in the middle of the show. And even if the DI is good the pre-amp in the bass rig is imparting a sound to the bass that often isn't helpful out front and your better off with just the pre in the console. Cleans up the signal chain. In the case of an active bass you'd have a pre in the bass, a pre in the amp and a pre in the console. If you really don't trust the engineers in the places you play and you play an amp with a lot of character like an SVT or a vintage Fender then ask for just a mic and no DI. Maybe even buy your own MD421 or something and carry it along. This is unusual however. Most people just let the engineer handle it.
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David Parker

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2011, 05:05:44 pm »



 At FOH I like to have a "dry" input from a DI between the bass and anything else so I can deal with the content of the bass sound independent of the bassist tweaking his rig to sound right to him on stage.

that doesn't work well if the bassist is using effects.
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Iain McCulloch

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2011, 06:47:49 pm »

Bass -> Players Effects -> Di -> Sansamp RBI inserted @ FOH ->

Tweek Sansamp at soundcheck with bassist listening out-front 'till we're both happy.

Since implementing this I've had only: happy bass players, happy engineer, and much praise from bassists in the audience...   

My sound is great at rehearsal Thru 1x15 & 1X12 cabs. At the gig I run those and a line out of pre-amp to FOH. At most if not all venues my baseline settings need to be adjusted. EQ'ing less lows and low mids both for stage and FOH. Any ideas?

g'bye, Dick Rees

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2011, 07:18:53 pm »



 At FOH I like to have a "dry" input from a DI between the bass and anything else so I can deal with the content of the bass sound independent of the bassist tweaking his rig to sound right to him on stage.

that doesn't work well if the bassist is using effects.

I neglected to mention that I take two inputs on the bass:

dry from the DI
mic on the amp

That way I don't miss FX but I have something dry to balance things in the house and be able to get the bass to sit in the mix.

And as Marsellus said, a high percentage of bass amp DI outputs have noise.
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Paul Dershem

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2011, 04:04:04 pm »

I'm a bassist who uses a few effects pedals. I route my post-effects/pre-EQ signal into a Countryman DI, which splits the signal between FOH and my on-stage rig. If I tweak the EQ on my amp, it doesn't affect FOH. I elevate or tilt my small on-stage cabinet so I can hear myself clearly without playing any louder than necessary. I've never had a complaint from a soundman.
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Dave Bigelow

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2011, 04:12:18 pm »

that doesn't work well if the bassist is using effects.

Works fine for me, put the DI after the effects.

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thomas jones

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2011, 01:37:28 am »

My line out post pre-amp/effects to FOH has nothing to do with my stage rig. The settings almost always need to be re-adjusted to eliminate the boom/woof. I'm not particularly "accustomed to" the studio/rehearsal sound, I just know what I want after 45 years of playing. I've noticed this anomaly for many years with many different rigs, basses, and venues and it's puzzled me forever. I don't have a problem with adjusting eq for the room; I just thought that with all the combined audio genius here that I'd get more a more technical explanation than "learn to get along with it"... I learned to get along with it and ring out my bass before and during the shows long ago and I get along just fine with sound techs. Sometimes I run the sound from the stage and rely on friends in the audience for input (not to mention ambient noise). Not ideal but some small/medium places just don't budget for a tech. I have used several brands of pre-amps and active basses and although some are decidedly cleaner than others, the boom is common to all. I have played with mega loud stage volume bands and jazz groups with stage volume you can talk above in a normal voice, and it's always the same; reduce the lows (25 sloping to 250 or so). Now I do it without too much thought but it still bugs me because I don't understand why.
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Martin Primus

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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2011, 04:33:04 pm »

My line out post pre-amp/effects to FOH has nothing to do with my stage rig. The settings almost always need to be re-adjusted to eliminate the boom/woof. I'm not particularly "accustomed to" the studio/rehearsal sound, I just know what I want after 45 years of playing. I've noticed this anomaly for many years with many different rigs, basses, and venues and it's puzzled me forever. I don't have a problem with adjusting eq for the room; I just thought that with all the combined audio genius here that I'd get more a more technical explanation than "learn to get along with it"... I learned to get along with it and ring out my bass before and during the shows long ago and I get along just fine with sound techs. Sometimes I run the sound from the stage and rely on friends in the audience for input (not to mention ambient noise). Not ideal but some small/medium places just don't budget for a tech. I have used several brands of pre-amps and active basses and although some are decidedly cleaner than others, the boom is common to all. I have played with mega loud stage volume bands and jazz groups with stage volume you can talk above in a normal voice, and it's always the same; reduce the lows (25 sloping to 250 or so). Now I do it without too much thought but it still bugs me because I don't understand why.

In my experience, I usually EQ my bass rig to my taste on-stage, and send FOH a clean signal.  The muddy/boomy can then be fixed at FOH.  What I've noticed as a sound guy is that a lot of the problem occurs with sound "piling up" around 100-150hz, which is where subs/tops often have overlapping material.  A significant cut to the house EQ in that region usually solves for muddy/boomy and allows me to add back those frequencies to taste on the channel strips of the mixer.  If you're cranking your onstage rig you may not be able to solve the issue without rolling back the low end, but it's never been a problem for me or any of the sound techs I work with.
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Re: bass guitar boomy
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2011, 04:33:04 pm »


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