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Author Topic: crazy ears  (Read 7215 times)

Mike Reilly

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2011, 10:35:36 am »


Other than that, the other suggestions about testing your rig & swapping cables seem reasonable as a reality check, as it's not utterly impossible that your "random" setup has by sheer chance often put the same speakers/cables/etc on the same side night after night.  Plus of course if there's an issue with your desk or snake or FOH gear/cables then one side could be louder regardless of speakers & amps.

this goes back several very different systems. Everything has been changed. Several times. Different mixers, different eq's, different crossovers, different speakers, different bands, different venues, and within all those differences, never set up the same way twice, and it's always the same, the left side appears louder. Unless of course my mix position is way on the right side, which sometimes it is.

Well, that rules out any technical causes, so I would guess there's something physiological/psychological at work here, including what I think Dick was suggesting - that you have a dominant left ear.
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John Roberts {JR}

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #21 on: June 03, 2011, 10:56:53 am »

If you turn your back to the system, does the same side sound louder?

JR
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Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

David Parker

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2011, 12:19:34 pm »

If you turn your back to the system, does the same side sound louder?

JR
I'm going to try that tomorrow night. That would tell all. First law of A-B testing, swap EVERYTHING around, including your ears!
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Chris Hindle

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2011, 12:24:33 pm »

If you turn your back to the system, does the same side sound louder?

JR
I'm going to try that tomorrow night. That would tell all. First law of A-B testing, swap EVERYTHING around, including your ears!

I recommend putting on a blindfold, and having someone turn you around on a swivel chair. A couple of times pointing foreward a couple of times pointing backwards.
Take your eyes out of the calculation.
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Ya, Whatever. Just throw a '57 on it, and get off my stage.

John Roberts {JR}

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2011, 01:22:50 pm »

If you turn your back to the system, does the same side sound louder?

JR
I'm going to try that tomorrow night. That would tell all. First law of A-B testing, swap EVERYTHING around, including your ears!

I recommend putting on a blindfold, and having someone turn you around on a swivel chair. A couple of times pointing foreward a couple of times pointing backwards.
Take your eyes out of the calculation.
IMO that wouldn't work. You should be able to pretty easily determine front or back from the ear's pinnae transform based on sound arrival path. Comb filtering occurs due to reflections off our outer ears that color sounds coming from above and behind differently than from straight forward. 

The sound from behind will have less HF content but may be enough to identify a relative gain issue with his meat machinery.

Note: I run a lot so get plenty of practice listening to to the sounds of vehicles coming from behind me. It is different, we hear much better in the forward direction. 

[edit] easier yet to test your ears, just listen to a pair of cans first one way, and then reversed, and if the same side sounds louder the problem is you... [/edit]

JR
« Last Edit: June 03, 2011, 03:18:25 pm by John Roberts {JR} »
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Listen to what a properly "cleared" drum sounds like.   http://circularscience.com/

Jay Barracato

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2011, 01:24:51 pm »

I'm going to try that tomorrow night. That would tell all. First law of A-B testing, swap EVERYTHING around, including your ears!


I recommend putting on a blindfold, and having someone turn you around on a swivel chair. A couple of times pointing foreward a couple of times pointing backwards.
Take your eyes out of the calculation.

IMO that wouldn't work. You should be able to pretty easily determine front or back from the ear's pinnae transform based on sound arrival path. Comb filtering occurs due to reflections off our outer ears that color sounds coming from above and behind differently than from straight forward. 

The sound from behind will have less HF content but may be enough to identify a relative gain issue with his meat machinery.

Note: I run a lot so get plenty of practice listening to to the sounds of vehicles coming from behind me. It is different, we hear much better in the forward direction. 

JR

Well I guess standing him on his head...
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Jay Barracato

Tim Padrick

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2011, 05:53:34 am »

Ever pull the cables at the output of your board and swap them?  If it's something after the board causing it, the volume change will switch sides.

If it doesn't, it's happening before it leaves the board,

You got it backwards.
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Steve Hurt

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #27 on: June 05, 2011, 10:59:50 am »

You got it backwards.

You're correct. 
D'uohhh!
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Marsellus Fariss

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #28 on: June 27, 2011, 02:48:38 pm »

I experienced this in the venue I work for. Turns out it was two things. Although the hang is the same distance over the edge of the stage on each side (I hung it, I measured) the center line of the stage is not actually the dead center. It's a few feet to one side. A symptom of how the semi-circular stage was built. It's a little irregular. So the left hang was a dB or two hotter then the right cause I was standing a few feet closer to that hang.  ::)

Other thing I discovered is that analogue limiter we used had knobs that couldn't be placed on the shafts very accurately and the input gain on one side was a little lower then the other although visually they where both set the same. I had to pull the unit, insert it on a mix buss at FOH and have a good listen with headphones to adjust the two sides to be even regardless of what the knobs looked like. 
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Marsellus Fariss
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Grey Eagle Music Hall

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duane massey

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Re: crazy ears
« Reply #29 on: June 27, 2011, 07:22:35 pm »

JR's headphone test is a great idea.
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Duane Massey
Technician, musician, stubborn old guy
Houston, Texas
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