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Author Topic: Can I use an L6-30?  (Read 8411 times)

James Feenstra

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Re: Can I use an L6-30?
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2011, 03:56:44 pm »

was all of this knowledge in your head when you were born?
depending on what schools of human psychology you subscribe to, that may indeed be correct

there's one theory that all the information we'll ever need or use is hardwired into our brains and we discover it over time

mind you, I think it's complete bullshit, although it would explain why some people never learn!
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Chris Gruber

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Re: Can I use an L6-30?
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2011, 04:27:30 pm »

was all of this knowledge in your head when you were born?
depending on what schools of human psychology you subscribe to, that may indeed be correct

there's one theory that all the information we'll ever need or use is hardwired into our brains and we discover it over time



Sweet! One of these days I will wake up an electrician.   ::)
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Rob Spence

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Re: Can I use an L6-30?
« Reply #12 on: May 22, 2011, 12:14:23 pm »

You are not likely to get instructions for doing electrical wiring on the Internet. At least, not authoritative information.

There is a reason an electrician apprentice has to work 6 years before being allowed to take the exam.

Anyone giving specific instruction on the Internet is "publishing" and could be held liable (note I didn't say would be, but could be) if someone was hurt or killed as a result of that advice.

This is why people are reluctant to say it is OK to do some specific thing.

How did I learn? I worked with electricians off and on over the years to learn good practice and I read the NEC. The cost of the book (the workbook) I consider to be worthwhile.

When I have a question, I call an electrician and ask. He (or she) IS an authority on the topic and they can give me good advice.

I have not seen any electricians on these boards giving advice and in general, I don't expect to. So, if someone who is NOT an electrician is giving advice, be careful about how you use it.

my $0.02
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Tim McCulloch

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Re: Can I use an L6-30?
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2011, 12:23:02 pm »

"The venue has a no tie-in policy, even with a licensed electrician"

This is sometimes the case, For good reason.

Many times the Venues have a "Service Electrician" on contract or on staff to do this type of work (You Get to Pay).

It may be an option to run more Amps, that can be run off 20 Amp Circuits.

Regards, John

I don't know how the outlet for an Itech running on 220 should be wired but it seems as if it should be 2 hots and a ground right? Does than mean, with the correctly wired cord end, that I can plug the Itech directly into an L6-30 which is hot/hot/ground? Thanks.

No.  The cable supplied by Crown does not have an L6-30.  You can build an adapter if you like.

This bullshit venue with a 'no tie-in policy' acts like they don't want business from clients with real power needs... and their "answer" to their policy is illegal, immoral and possibly fattening... unless the L6-30 was installed for the venue's use with commercial equipment or applicances that run exclusively on 240v (for which this circuit is under under voltage by >10%).

Have fun, don't burn down a building....

Tim Mc
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Brad Gibson

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Re: Can I use an L6-30?
« Reply #14 on: May 22, 2011, 09:29:43 pm »

If you don't know the answer to this question then you have no business using this plug or any other plug you don't know how to use.  ALWAYS hire a certified and bonded  electrician.
It should not be your responsibility to pay him either.  Make it part of your contract that the promoter supplies you with a certified and bonded electrician to prepare and remove all A/C requirements.


Thats why I asked Brad. How else is one supposed to learn? I said nothing about doing any wiring myself. How did you learn, or was all of this knowledge in your head when you were born?

Dont expect that at all.  But I was born with a good degree of common sense.  You were asking and that was my answer.  I was not trying to roast you in any way.  A/C is some serious stuff.  You don't want the liability of this issue.  Best case you burn the place down.  Worst case you kill people doing it. 

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Chris Gruber

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Re: Can I use an L6-30?
« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2011, 12:14:45 pm »

You are not likely to get instructions for doing electrical wiring on the Internet. At least, not authoritative information.

There is a reason an electrician apprentice has to work 6 years before being allowed to take the exam.

Anyone giving specific instruction on the Internet is "publishing" and could be held liable (note I didn't say would be, but could be) if someone was hurt or killed as a result of that advice.

This is why people are reluctant to say it is OK to do some specific thing.

How did I learn? I worked with electricians off and on over the years to learn good practice and I read the NEC. The cost of the book (the workbook) I consider to be worthwhile.

When I have a question, I call an electrician and ask. He (or she) IS an authority on the topic and they can give me good advice.

I have not seen any electricians on these boards giving advice and in general, I don't expect to. So, if someone who is NOT an electrician is giving advice, be careful about how you use it.

my $0.02

I totally get this.
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Re: Can I use an L6-30?
« Reply #15 on: May 23, 2011, 12:14:45 pm »


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