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Author Topic: Electrical safety question  (Read 4653 times)

Franklin Benjamin

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Re: Electrical safety question
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2011, 12:00:03 pm »

AHA!!! This was my initial thought of application. What in a similar range would recommend?
I would not be able to give you a good recomendation. I am using a 9.0 for subs.  In that price/ power range I am not sure.  My subs seem to carry a different character (how's that for a description) depending on the amp that drives them.  You might have a better result and opinions are very subjective.  Give it a try and see if you like it.  Because you are planning to run it for subs, be aware that you might trip the 20 amp circuit but it should be able to get pretty loud before that happens.
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Brad Weber

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Re: Electrical safety question
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2011, 01:54:16 pm »

My thinking is along the lines of what Tim said above. You're dealing with a higher pull, rather than a higher push. The plugging a 20A device into a 30A socket is a no-brainer. However, I am not sure what the risks are of plugging a spec'ed 30A device into a 20A circuit, aside from potentially tripping a breaker. Ergo, I'm asking everyone else!
That is assuming there is a properly rated breaker that is functioning correctly.  The problem would seem to be connecting a device that could try to draw more than the installed wiring and receptacle are rated to support, thus basically creating a situation that relies on what is supposed to be a safety device to provide current limiting during 'normal' use.  If you build an adapter you might include a 20A breaker in it so that what you are connecting can't pull more than 20A and you know that you have a working breaker on the line.
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Geoff Doane

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Re: Electrical safety question
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2011, 04:40:09 pm »

  If you build an adapter you might include a 20A breaker in it so that what you are connecting can't pull more than 20A and you know that you have a working breaker on the line.

That would be sort of a "belt and suspenders" approach I guess.

Personally, I just wear a belt.  :)

You didn't mention what you are loading the amp with.  If it requires a 30A supply when running at 2 ohms, it will only need about half that when running only 4 ohms per channel, and a 20A circuit should be more than adequate.

GTD
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John Neil

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Re: Electrical safety question
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2011, 08:13:29 pm »

I know "someone" who tripped a 20a with a 4.0.  It wasn't under "normal" conditions.

That case was four subs per channel with heavily compressed hip-hop backing tracks.

On the other hand, I know of an outfit that has monitor racks with a pair of 4.0 and a pair of 1.0...four biamped mixes on a single 20a supply.  It's never an issue.

I've seen plenty of 4.0 with Edisons on them.  Even know of a few rogue 6.0 and pl380 set up the same.  Probably depends on the use.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2011, 08:20:14 pm by John Neil »
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Josh Billings

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Re: Electrical safety question
« Reply #14 on: May 19, 2011, 08:39:58 pm »

Lol I have a PL 6.0 on a 20 amp circuit (15 amp plug) and haven't tripped a breaker. Granted i don't run it very hard, but i've had it like that for years

You're find, just build / buy an adapter (RV / Boat supply Stores sell them)

-Josh Billings
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Brian Jones

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Re: Electrical safety question
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2011, 09:11:03 pm »

My thinking is along the lines of what Tim said above. You're dealing with a higher pull, rather than a higher push. The plugging a 20A device into a 30A socket is a no-brainer. However, I am not sure what the risks are of plugging a spec'ed 30A device into a 20A circuit, aside from potentially tripping a breaker. Ergo, I'm asking everyone else!
That is assuming there is a properly rated breaker that is functioning correctly.  The problem would seem to be connecting a device that could try to draw more than the installed wiring and receptacle are rated to support, thus basically creating a situation that relies on what is supposed to be a safety device to provide current limiting during 'normal' use.  If you build an adapter you might include a 20A breaker in it so that what you are connecting can't pull more than 20A and you know that you have a working breaker on the line.

This is a very good idea.

For the record, I use an extension cord with a 15A plug and 20A receptacle when using my iTech8000 which is 20A when at home because I'm plugging into a 20A breaker. I didn't really think about this aspect though... although the breaker is 20A, the wiring and receptacle leading to that breaker aren't necessarily. I guess I should rethink that - although TBH, I don't drive it that hard at home. Nonetheless, looking now for an external breaker solution.
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John Livings

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Re: Electrical safety question
« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2011, 12:27:43 am »

Lol I have a PL 6.0 on a 20 amp circuit (15 amp plug) and haven't tripped a breaker. Granted i don't run it very hard, but i've had it like that for years

You're find, just build / buy an adapter (RV / Boat supply Stores sell them)

-Josh Billings

+1, Just test things out Prior to the Gig.

This is running 2-QW-218s @ 8 Ohms or 2-QW-4s @ 8 Ohms with a PL 6.0.II, Plus a rack that has 10 wireless, 1 mixer and a 24 channel recorder.

All on 1- 20 Amp Circuit, Pushing things, 16-17 Amps, 90% of the time, under 10 Amps.

I am talking about 120 Volt, 20 Amp, Single Phase

Just take care of your Equipment.

Regards,  John

http://www.amazon.com/Conntek-14200-1-5-Foot-Pigtail-Connector/dp/B002IZKDHK/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1305906445&sr=8-5
« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 11:49:48 am by John Livings »
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Re: Electrical safety question
« Reply #16 on: May 20, 2011, 12:27:43 am »


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