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Author Topic: Alternative to Gooseneck mics  (Read 11722 times)

Bennett Prescott

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2011, 11:06:06 am »

Ian,

I think the Audix Micros are some of the best sounding and best behaved, plus available in a variety of patterns.

Can't help you with the douche nozzles. Sorry everything sucks.
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Ian Stuart

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2011, 06:47:35 pm »

It's absolutely true, the distance from face to mic is rediculous. They truly are afraid of their own voices. I completely agree with Jim, If I had some PEQ's to run with it would make everything a lot easier to flatten everything without the nastyness of graphic notches.

I'll be running some pink noise next time via PEQ to flatten my boxes and the room to some extent. I'm getting realy sick of GEQ's, whilst they are great for notching out 3 or 4 rings in a room, they kind of suck at flattening anything.

I'm now very happy to finally know a little about shotgun mics too. I really had no idea before  ;D

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Mike Caldwell

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2011, 09:30:15 am »

I have had great results with the Countryman Isomax podium goose neck mics with minimal tweaking. What also works very well is the AKG 535 on a Neutrik XLR goose neck, while not as sleek as the smaller goose neck mics it still looks good.
Make sure there is no play in any of the mic mounting hardware, if on the rare occasion when someone will attempt to adjust the mic for their height and there is slack or play somewhere on the mounting hardware and the mic does not stay where they moved it to they will usually give up on adjusting it.
On the other hand if some feel the slightest of resistance when starting to adjust a mic they will stop.

Headset/earset mics are great there are some who will refuse to use one but that is getting better however.

Keynote speakers who are afraid of their own voice makes you wonder how they get chosen to be the keynote speaker in the first place!

Bob Leonard

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2011, 03:08:23 pm »

Ian,

I think the Audix Micros are some of the best sounding and best behaved, plus available in a variety of patterns.

Can't help you with the douche nozzles. Sorry everything sucks.

I agree with Bennett on this. Although I don't live in "Douche bag nozzle" land, and work few talking head gigs to say the least, I have done a number of these gigs using Audix Micros and the results were superb. GBF is outstanding and the patterns advertized appear to be accurate.
 
So up here in "dumb ass" land I would recommend you try the Audix product, combine that with as much distance from the cabinets as you can get, turn up the gain until the system feeds back, back off 3db, then sit back and watch the show.
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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #14 on: April 30, 2011, 03:15:19 pm »

Dealing with speakers who back off the mic as soon as they hear themselves is always a problem.  Otherwise intelligent and (corporately) accomplished individuals descend into uncomprehending idiocy when mic technique is explained to them......or they take offense at being "schooled".  Two things I have always wanted to do:

Put a pressure activated on/off switch (or an infra-red optical gate) at the lectern such that, if they are not in the proper position, the mic will not pass signal.  RADICAL!!!

Another dastardly dream of mine is a mercury switch built into hand-held wireless mics so that they would only function within 5-10 degrees of horizontal.  Those holding it "ice cream cone" style would automatically disable the mic.

Lastly........a body pack "taser" for bio-feedback training............

Well, I can dream, can't I?
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James Feenstra

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2011, 03:53:23 pm »

I will NEVER again do a Corpy gig without a rehearsal.
me either, from a sound or lighting perspective

what do you mean you want 3467 cues to happen that you haven't told me about until they're supposed to happen?
no, I don't know what 'crazy disco lights' are, and I certainly don't have any
sure, I'll gladly reposition the entire lighting rig 5 minutes before doors...it's an extra $10,000, and will require 40 guys here for at least 4 hours to do...
I'm glad the decor looks good, it'll look even better when it's on fire because you hung it in front of the pyrotechnics/source 4s/2k Fresnels....

sigh...is it pizza season yet?

as for the op's issue, well, a little schooling *sometimes* helps, but for the most part i find they thing mics are magic wands that will pick them up simply because they exist
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Kent Elliott

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2011, 01:08:09 pm »

I've had good luck with the mini-shotguns (the previously mentioned AKG C747 and Audio Technica U857).  The primary advantage is that the tonal quality does not change much as the presenter moves closer or further away from the mic.  You may have problems if there is (relatively) high output behind the podium (a large choir, etc.).  In general, they're the best solution I've found for consistent sound with difficult presenters.
  If you've got a highly reverberent room, poor speaker placement, etc., I don't think any mic is going to 'cure' it.
Kent Elliott

Alternative to Gooseneck mics? What do you guys think?

I think the main reason why I'm ALWAYS being asked to use them is because all the client likes how they look. But I tell you I am fucking sick to death of them, The gain-before-feedback point is unacceptably low when day after day I'm working with douche-nozzles with no microphone technique, and it's always MY fault. I need to look at another alternative before I go crazy.

What do you guys think of using a shotgun mic mounted to the lecturn? I don't yet own one and am hesitant to buy one because I fear breaking it. on 50% of these gigs, the same no-mic-technique douche bag walks straight up to the mic and taps on it to get everyones attention, will this damage a shotgun mic? For a standard super-cardioid shotgun, how much tighter would the polar pattern be to traditional gooseneck if mounted about a foot and a half away from their face?

Let me know what you guys think.
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Paul Dershem

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2011, 02:57:21 pm »

Dealing with speakers who back off the mic as soon as they hear themselves is always a problem.  Otherwise intelligent and (corporately) accomplished individuals descend into uncomprehending idiocy when mic technique is explained to them......or they take offense at being "schooled".  Two things I have always wanted to do:

Put a pressure activated on/off switch (or an infra-red optical gate) at the lectern such that, if they are not in the proper position, the mic will not pass signal.  RADICAL!!!

Another dastardly dream of mine is a mercury switch built into hand-held wireless mics so that they would only function within 5-10 degrees of horizontal.  Those holding it "ice cream cone" style would automatically disable the mic.

Lastly........a body pack "taser" for bio-feedback training............

Well, I can dream, can't I?

Brilliant! Strap a remotely operated shock collar around the speaker's neck and tell 'em it's a feedback eliminator!
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kristianjohnsen

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2011, 07:49:54 pm »

Alternative to Gooseneck mics? What do you guys think?

I think the main reason why I'm ALWAYS being asked to use them is because all the client likes how they look. But I tell you I am fucking sick to death of them, The gain-before-feedback point is unacceptably low when day after day I'm working with douche-nozzles with no microphone technique, and it's always MY fault. I need to look at another alternative before I go crazy.

What do you guys think of using a shotgun mic mounted to the lecturn? I don't yet own one and am hesitant to buy one because I fear breaking it. on 50% of these gigs, the same no-mic-technique douche bag walks straight up to the mic and taps on it to get everyones attention, will this damage a shotgun mic? For a standard super-cardioid shotgun, how much tighter would the polar pattern be to traditional gooseneck if mounted about a foot and a half away from their face?

Let me know what you guys think.

I think it's a sound guy's natural instinct to go for something with a tighter pattern when feedback looms, but fact is, going to a wider pattern may actually give you more GBF in some situations:

When using a mic with a super tight pick-up pattern you're very dependent on the pattern pointing at where the sound is coming from.  This is hardly ever the case with speakers with poor mic technique.  When the pickup pattern is pointing away from the source you have to raise the gain to a very high level to get usable sound in the range where the mic is actually a hypercardioid - and by the time the gain is that high you're way into feedback territory in the frequency range where the mic isn't.  Like someone hinted to before:  Below 500 Hz most mics have the same pickup pattern anyway.

Try with any high quality pencil condenser or even handheld condenser vocal mic with just a normal semi-wide cardioid pattern and you might be surprised!  I have had excellent results with various types just attached to the lectern with a table clamp.

PS:  Off topic but very much related:  Just attended a Bryan Adams show and he has a very unusual mic technique where he sings to the right of his microphone, varying the angle and distance to act as a natural compressor.  His voice sounded absolutely excellent in every position and the frequency response sounded the same when he was turning away or even singing off to the side of the mic.  At one point he turned the mic towards the audience and one could tell the cymbals dropping in level, but not sounding all that different - making me suspect that his vocal mic picks up a bit of "drum wash" - but reproduces it well due to the characteristics of the mic.

FWIW, from where I was standing the mic looked like a Neumann KMS 105.








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Iain.Macdonald

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2011, 02:12:32 pm »

Alternative to Gooseneck mics? What do you guys think?

I think the main reason why I'm ALWAYS being asked to use them is because all the client likes how they look. But I tell you I am fucking sick to death of them, The gain-before-feedback point is unacceptably low when day after day I'm working with douche-nozzles with no microphone technique, and it's always MY fault. I need to look at another alternative before I go crazy.

What do you guys think of using a shotgun mic mounted to the lecturn? I don't yet own one and am hesitant to buy one because I fear breaking it. on 50% of these gigs, the same no-mic-technique douche bag walks straight up to the mic and taps on it to get everyones attention, will this damage a shotgun mic? For a standard super-cardioid shotgun, how much tighter would the polar pattern be to traditional gooseneck if mounted about a foot and a half away from their face?

Let me know what you guys think.

Hmm. It is your fault! Your job is to make them look good, whoever they are. Remember these folks are amateurs. Some of them may have had public speaking coaching. But most of those trainers miss out on microphone technique. It's your job to explain to them, and to demonstrate how and why they should do what you show them. Especially when you explain that it will make them look and sound better. People always like their vanity stroked. Hopefully your interpersonal communications are less aggressive than your post!

Boundary mics are OK if the lectern is non resonant. But they can be a real problem if the speaker grabs the lectern in a death grip, and starts tapping it because of nervousness. Foot tappers can also cause the same problem. Bruce Bartlett ex of Crown is now producing the equivalent of the  Crown PCC160. 

For a more advanced solution check out the Revoluto series from BeyerDynamic

For a better podium mic, either Earthworks or Schoeps. Dick Rees made the suggestion of a Sabine unit, which can be a lifesaver. Another similar lower cost unit used by many, but they would never admit doing so, is the Behringer series of feedback/eq units.

Iain.

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Re: Alternative to Gooseneck mics
« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2011, 02:12:32 pm »


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