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Author Topic: Pulpit mic  (Read 6997 times)

Matt Carr

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Pulpit mic
« on: January 18, 2011, 12:57:35 pm »

Have a problem with visiting guest speakers not speaking directly into the pulpit mic. When they look left and right we lose voices. Existing mic is a gooseneck shotgun style and I'm asking if you guys think a cardioid or supercardioid would help pick up some of the sides that we are losing. Headsets are not an option in resolving this issue by the way. Too many people and too much cost.
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Dick Rees

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Re: Pulpit mic
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2011, 01:09:16 pm »

Matt.....

It will be much quicker and easier to help out if you tell us exactly what the existing mic is:  brand/model.

Is it really a shotgun mic or does it just look like that?

Knowing the make and model will be the key.

DR
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Matt Carr

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Re: Pulpit mic
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2011, 01:22:56 pm »

Agreed. I'll try and stop over there this afternoon and get that info.
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Arnold B. Krueger

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Re: Pulpit mic
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2011, 01:41:37 pm »

Matt Carr wrote on Tue, 18 January 2011 17:57

Have a problem with visiting guest speakers not speaking directly into the pulpit mic. When they look left and right we lose voices.



Your problem is due to the directionality of the source, not the pickup pattern of the microphone microphone.  A mic with a different pickup pattern could easily  have the exact same problem.

If you simply set the mic gain a little higher, this kind of loss won't be as serious.
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Jonathan Johnson

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Re: Pulpit mic
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2011, 10:18:48 am »

If you have adequate gain before feedback, moving the mic further away from the source and turning up the gain can help prevent these dropouts.

If the mic is very close, say an inch from the mouth when they are facing forward, when they turn to the side it could be as much as four inches (four times the distance) away. Combine that with directionality of the source and you could see a significant change in SPL at the mic element (perhaps 10-15 dB).

If the mic is further away, say 6 inches, as they turn to the side the distance changes to about 8 inches (1.3 times the distance), plus the mic stays more in the directionality pattern of the source so you have less of a change in SPL (perhaps 2-3 dB).
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Brian Ehlers

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Re: Pulpit mic
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2011, 12:48:41 pm »

Here's another approach which helps to smooth the level a little:
I place the mic element left of center of the person's head, even a little left of their ear.  (No it's not alongside their head;  it's still located about a foot in front of them).  I then aim the axis of the mic towards the center, but actually so that it's aimed a little in front of the person's mouth.  (Of course, you can do the complete opposite and switch left and right.)

When they turn their head to their left, their mouth gets closer to the mic, but it ends up more off-axis, so the net result is little change in level.  When they turn their head right, their mouth gets slightly further from the mic, but it's also slightly more on axis, again resulting in little change in level.  For best results, you want to use a mic with a fairly consistent frequency response off-axis.

An added benefit to this approach is that, since the mic is not directly in front of their face, it is less vulnerable to plosives.  And most of the congregation can see them better.
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Re: Pulpit mic
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2011, 12:48:41 pm »


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