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Projector and Screen install for gym

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Kristian Stevenson:
So is the pearlescent screen worth it or should I just stick with a matte white?

Kristian Stevenson:
So we've got a few people concerned about hanging a stationary screen in a gym. They want to go with an electric screen just for the sake of being able to keep it safe, which would cost us a lot more money and install work. Would the stationary screen be "safe" in the gym? It would be mounted about 10 feet up on one end of the court. I could only foresee a stray dodge ball or kick ball hitting it.

Kristian Stevenson:
To cut costs we have decided to make our on fixed screen. We will buy screen fabric like what we already have for out portable screen and build a border around it to make it more permanent. I was also thinking since the wall is already a dull (non glossy" white, what would it hurt to just shine on the wall??

Arnold B. Krueger:
Kristian Stevenson wrote on Thu, 16 December 2010 05:38
To cut costs we have decided to make our on fixed screen. We will buy screen fabric like what we already have for out portable screen and build a border around it to make it more permanent. I was also thinking since the wall is already a dull (non glossy" white, what would it hurt to just shine on the wall??


Simply projecting on a painted wall can work pretty well if the wall is a light, neutral color and doesn't have a lot of room light falling on it.

Out back-wall display for cuing the people on the platform is just a section of a cinder block wall that was painted a light brown many years before. We put a maybe 20 foot diagonal picture on it with a 1500 lumen ceiling-mounted  Canon XGA projector. It's in an area that is shaded from window light sources and is very acceptable. The texture of the wall is not noticeable given that it can't be seen from the main floor from less than about 60 feet away.

Screens made of specially-formulated regular interior house paint on smooth surfaces such as finished drywall are favored by many videophiles. If you search google you can find recommendations for formulating specific brands of paint at your local home improvement store, along with photographs of actual installations in use.

There are also paints that are specially formulated for the specific purpose. There is a controversy over whether they are worth the extra money.

Brad Weber:
Just remember that home theatres are typically quite different situations than most churches in terms of viewing area and ambient light.  Viewing area has to be one of the most overlooked aspects with screens and what works well for a deep but narrow space may not work as well for a much wider space where some viewers are further off axis from the screen(s).

How important color rendition is to you can also be a factor.  From experience, Coca-Cola doesn't want to see just a red logo, they want to see Coca-Cola red, so accurate color rendition factors into their projector and screen choices.  I've also had corporate clients that wanted a typical consumer TV with default settings in addition to color matched displays so they could preview ads both as the production company wants them to see them and as typical consumers might see them.  For many churches, this is not a big issue but if you're doing i-mag or if someone may be upset if the church logo color seems a bit off then it could be.

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