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Projector and Screen install for gym

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Kristian Stevenson:
We are looking to buy a projector and electric screen to install in our gym. I am looking at the Panasonic PT-DW6300US. It is a 16:10 projector. My problem now is finding a 16:10 screen large enough for what we want. We currently have a 9'x16' portable screen we use with a Panasonic PT-DW5100u and really like that screen size in the gym.

I found a 16:9 screen big enough but that wouldn't jive with the 16:10 projector. Would the 16:10 projector throw a 16:9 image? Panasonic doesn't list 1280x768 as one of the supported resolutions so I wasn't sure. What would you guys recommend? I would need a long throw lense capable of ~105ft for whichever projector I go with.

Thanks,
Kristian

Kristian Stevenson:
I might have just answered my own question or at least done away with it. We decided to just use the projector we have (Panasonic PT-DW5100u) and buy a long throw lense for it and use it in the gym. Then we will buy another projector for our youth room (where the 5100u currently is). It would be a lot smaller projector as the youth room doesn't require the brightness the 5100u puts out. This route is more cost saving for us because we would be buying a 2000 dollar projector vs. a 6500 dollar one. My screen issue is also solved because the 5100u is a 16:9 projector.

With the factory lense, the 5100u is bright enough for the gym but when we add the long throw lense, would the brightness decrease any? The projection calculator on projectorcentral.com says it will be fine but I was just wondering if anyone had any real world experience. I have never used these long throw lenses.

Brad Weber:
Kristian Stevenson wrote on Mon, 22 November 2010 16:01
With the factory lense, the 5100u is bright enough for the gym but when we add the long throw lense, would the brightness decrease any? The projection calculator on projectorcentral.com says it will be fine but I was just wondering if anyone had any real world experience. I have never used these long throw lenses.

Long throw lenses typically do reduce the image brightness just because of the optics of the lens and the additional elements necessary in the lens.  From what I can find, the standard lens for the PT-DW5100U has an F that ranges from 1.7 to 2.0 over the zoom range of the lens.  The original long throw lens option for that projector, the ET-DLE410, has an F range of 2.24 to 3.11.  The larger F values mean more light loss.

I would verify it with Panasonic, but the newer ET-DLE450 lens might also work with your projector and with an F of 1.88 to 2.35, would probably have minimal loss.

Kristian Stevenson:
Thanks for the reply Brad. I was actually going to go with the ET-DLE450 lense as I had read on various websites that it would work with the 5100u. I had tried to find the DLE410 but I couldn't find it at any online retailer.

To compensate for the loss of light in the lense I am considering a Da-lite Pearlescent screen to mount on the gym wall. Da-lite says that screen material is designed to compensate for a lower brightness projector. http://www.fullcompass.com/product/345763.html

Brad Weber:
Kristian Stevenson wrote on Wed, 24 November 2010 15:42
To compensate for the loss of light in the lense I am considering a Da-lite Pearlescent screen to mount on the gym wall. Da-lite says that screen material is designed to compensate for a lower brightness projector.

This is a generalization but compared to matte white screens, pearlescent screens tend to have a narrower viewing angle and be a a little more susceptible to hot spotting.  They sometimes also exhibit a bit of a color shift and a 'softer' image.  But they do tend to be affected less by ambient light than some other screen surfaces with gain values over 1, which is also what leads to the narrower viewing angle.

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