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Author Topic: dbx IEM Processor  (Read 19705 times)

Phil Rowley

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dbx IEM Processor
« on: March 23, 2010, 09:10:08 pm »

Got an "out of the box" idea and need some feedback (the constructive type, not destructive)  Smile  

We have an unused dbx IEM processor in the rack at monitor world.  Any reason why I can't use the two stereo channels on that unit for compressing some vocal channels?
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Dick Rees

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Re: dbx IEM Processor
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2010, 11:02:37 pm »

Phil...

It is generally considered a no-no to compress monitors.  There are various reasons, one of which is that it can lead to vocalists straining their voices trying to balance themselves in the mix but ending up fighting the compression.  A natural 1:1 ratio of input to output is recommended for monitoring purposes to maintain dynamics.

What is the specific issue you are trying to address with compression?
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Phil Rowley

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Re: dbx IEM Processor
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2010, 06:42:32 am »

Interesting....so my other dbx units that feed the IEM mixes should have compression turned off then?  Even the factory presets do like a 2:1 comp. on the total mix....hmmmm.  My reason is to keep things from overpowering our Aviom signal chain and keep from having to ride faders quite so much.  I think if we could smooth out some of the vocals, that would help.
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Arnold B. Krueger

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Re: dbx IEM Processor
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2010, 07:07:47 am »

Phil Rowley wrote on Wed, 24 March 2010 01:10

Got an "out of the box" idea and need some feedback (the constructive type, not destructive)  Smile  

We have an unused dbx IEM processor in the rack at monitor world.  Any reason why I can't use the two stereo channels on that unit for compressing some vocal channels?


Compressing monitors (as opposed to limiting them) would seem to make very little sense. The purpose of a monitor is to give the artist feedback about how he is singing, particularly how he is blending with other important sounds in the group.

If you compress the sound going to a monitor, you're upsetting that feedback.

Putting a limiter on a monitor signal is a different thing because it is there to protect ears and equipment from being too loud.
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Dick Rees

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Re: dbx IEM Processor
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2010, 09:13:14 am »

Exactly, Arnold.

It is often overlooked that such devices are called compressor limiters.  I would buy the use for limiting to protect hearing from accidental or long-term overage.  
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Phil Rowley

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Re: dbx IEM Processor
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2010, 09:30:55 am »

Thanks guys, for the insights.  I had never looked at it that way before.
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Thom "Fig" Fiegle

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Re: dbx IEM Processor
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2010, 12:53:07 pm »

The dbx box you mention is effectively a "souped-up DDP" or a "stripped-down Quantum" with a different name - trying to hook-into the in-ear monitor category.

To answer your original "technical question" and not to add to the "philisophical discussion" that you did NOT necessarily ask about -

there is absolutely no reason you cannot use that device in a non-IEM application (eg:  compressing vocals).  It is a multi-dynamics, Lexicon efx DSP box - it doesn't HAVE to be used on IEMs, see - which is what I think you are asking, right?

Hook it up and try it - the only way to know : )  I am fond of its multi-band compression, personally.

Cheers,

Fig
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Loren H. Griffin

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Re: dbx IEM Processor
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2010, 08:47:23 pm »

Reading some of the post that have been follow ups really makes me wonder how many techs really have any idea what the tool called a compressor is really for. Sorry if this sounds a bit sarcastic. First of all I hope those of you talking about using a compressor are talking about wedges and not IEMs. If you are talking about IEMs and make the assertions you have made then it is no wonder there are more truly devastating accidents happening to church musicians then anyone else. You do use compression when processing IEMs wedges I would agree no compressors. I would also highly recommend if you are the Audio tech for a church who is moving to in ear system that you learn as much about them as possible and that you completely understand the units and the safety precautions necessary to use them correctly. I now have a couple of friends who are legally deaf because of hot shot big ego "Church sound techs" So that everyone knows my credentials. I am a live and studio audio engineer as well as a  musician I have been working with sound for 30 years professionally. I started at the age of 13 making money at it working for a sound company. I hear all these opinions from weekend warriors and would be ego driven techs, and I am sorry that I sound harsh but honestly I have seen more damage because of egos in Church then anywhere else I have worked. I am a believer who trains sound techs that first of all you are a servant leave your ego at home second your a servant, leave your opinion at home, third your a servant so be one.
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