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Video Editing Workstation

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Arnold B. Krueger:
Christy L  Manoppo (okky) wrote on Thu, 28 January 2010 05:03
Of course we must utilize firewire to capture mini-DV's my brother  
And again, the workflow that you wrote is the same like I did.

The only thing is, if the video footage is 2 hours, then we must capture for almost the same like the video footage.



That's one of the downsides of Mini-DV, you have to transfer the video from the camera to the editing station at real time speed.

That plus the lack of frequent reusability of DV tape is what pushed me into using a DVD recorder wherever possible. DVD-R and DVD-RW media is dirt cheap. With care in handling, DVD-RW media can be reused dozens of times. We just burn DVD-Rs and put them into our archives after transferring them to our editing station.

Also, our video operator does some mixing in real time during the service. The DVD recorder is on the output of the mixer, using the same video we feed to the nursery, the green room, the family room, etc. She mixes between a live video camera and rescaled video from the 2 computers we use during the service to do video presentations for songs, announcements, and other videos.  The audio comes from the main mixing board.

Quote:

Also, what did those expensive capture cards do? Like the ones from AJA, Blackmagic Design, Matrox and Grass Valley.
The cost upwards to $$$$$.



Our normal production involves zero capture cards. The function of the capture card is performed by the mixer and the DVD recorder.

I searched around and found an inexpensive capture card that has its own sound encoder so that the sound stays in synch over a period of hours. It is made by Diamond multimedia, and may still be available for under $150. I only use it to digitize VHS tapes and the like.

Quote:

-link-

Will they decrease post production time? Like, transcoding, encoding, decoding...



You need a different kind of card to speed up post, and AFAIK most people don't go there.

A modern commodity quad core PC that you get from say Dell for under $1K will transcode video at the rate of several times faster than real time if your editing software supports multiple CPU cores, and Adobe Premiere Elements and regular Premiere do.

CPU speed helps 3 ways - it makes loading faster, editing smoother, and it speeds the transcode process at the end of job when you prepare the new media.

Loading and media preparation are the big time sinks - they are usually something you start and go get a cup of coffee, especially if you are working with 2 hour files.

I work with 80 minute files and I figure maybe 15-20 minutes to load, and another 20-30 to burn a finished DVD.

If I'm just pulling the sound out of the video, I can speed the process up quite a bit by using other software that ignores the video.

Christy L Manoppo (okky):
Quote:
Also, our video operator does some mixing in real time during the service. The DVD recorder is on the output of the mixer, using the same video we feed to the nursery, the green room, the family room, etc. She mixes between a live video camera and rescaled video from the 2 computers we use during the service to do video presentations for songs, announcements, and other videos. The audio comes from the main mixing board.


OK... well, what you did in your church is really the same thing like us here.

So, what did those expensive capture cards do? what are their primary function?  

sorry, as I am still puzzled.

Arnold B. Krueger:
Christy L  Manoppo (okky) wrote on Sat, 30 January 2010 03:47
Quote:
Also, our video operator does some mixing in real time during the service. The DVD recorder is on the output of the mixer, using the same video we feed to the nursery, the green room, the family room, etc. She mixes between a live video camera and rescaled video from the 2 computers we use during the service to do video presentations for songs, announcements, and other videos. The audio comes from the main mixing board.


OK... well, what you did in your church is really the same thing like us here.

So, what did those expensive capture cards do? what are their primary function?  

sorry, as I am still puzzled.


The simple answer is that we don't have any video capture cards in our sunday morning worship technology, expensive or otherwise. We do both our audio and video capture with stand-alone optical disc recorders.

Tim Urner:
Okky,

The video capture card "digitizes" the video signal so it can be saved as a data file on a computer. When you are hooking up your Mini DV camera via firewire the camera is the "capture device"

One of our customers uses the MOTU V4HD to capture HD video direct from their switcher to an iMac (Final Cut) The MOTU is a little overkill for simple capture but it is an upconvert box and a down convert box for almost any video media you can think of.

http://www.motu.com/video-products/v4hd/

Tim
PS how are your new monitors?

Christy L Manoppo (okky):
Thx Tim.

One of our problems is the quality of the recorded video we are having. I think, some part of it is because of the amateur grade switcher we have using (sima sfx-9). And also because the quality degradation of using Live Video feed from the easyworship software).  
Also, because we record directly to DVD, and after that, the same DVD got some post-production work. So, more decoding and transcoding, so the final video quality suffers.

I've trying to figure out how to improve flow, time and quality, but I also discovered that, to achieve that... it's not cheap.

For the new monitors... they are fabolous! Thanks steeplesound!

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