ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Down

Author Topic: 10 Rules To Live By.  (Read 13060 times)

Adam Brunkhorst

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 12
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2008, 11:52:25 pm »

I'd say the biggest thing that i can think of that many people overlook is the fact that everyone hears something a little different. What I think sounds amazing, another may think sounds "just ok." So what I'm saying, is take criticism with a grain of salt. There are a lot of "backseat mixers" in the world and if you let them get to you, you will have a very tough time doing your job correctly.
Logged

Devin B. Kim

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 5
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2008, 10:19:51 am »

wish I had a mute button on my ears for those backseat mixers...but most of the time, it's me doing the backseat mixing  Laughing   seriously I am not bothered with people's mixing styles and perferences....as long as it's not interfering with service simply because pastor mentions during sermon....
Logged

Josh Rose

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 59
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2008, 04:58:25 pm »

Ok... I'll try my hand at this. Here is a personal rule that has improved my abilities by leaps and bounds...

"If there is a knob, button, or piece of equipment that you don't understand... Learn it."

I remember when I was learning to engineer a long time ago. A few years in, I used compression a lot, but I didn't really understand it. I didn't know what ratio was. I didn't know the practical uses. I just used presets till it sounded cool... 5 minutes on wikipedia later, I knew a whole lot about compression, and starting applying it much more intelligently from that day forward.

Is there equipment at your FOH position that you don't understand? Learn it.
Logged

Karl P(eterson)

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 477
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2008, 01:05:25 am »

Josh Rose wrote on Wed, 11 June 2008 16:58

a long time ago


Quote:


5 minutes on wikipedia later



?

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Dynamic_range_comp ression&dir=prev&action=history

?

Karl P
Logged
Audio Team Leader - CCH

Don Boomer

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 119
    • http://www.line6.com
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2008, 07:25:15 pm »

karl maciag wrote on Tue, 10 June 2008 22:14


Learn how to gainstage.  Proper gainstaging will eliminate the majority of your grief. feedback will go away, tonality will be consistent.


Gain staging will help you with distortion and noise floor so it is something definitely to learn.  But is has nothing to do with feedback or tone.
Logged
Don Boomer
Microphone Product Line Mgr.
Line 6, inc
dboomer@line6.com

Tim Padrick

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 367
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2008, 01:41:30 am »

Rules for the musicians to live by: http://www.padrick.net/LiveSound/Welcome.htm

karl maciag

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2008, 10:13:10 pm »

Don, it all goes hand in hand.  As far as consistent tone,  pull the main bus of your desk down to -20, and push your faders and subgroups up to match the level you had when the main bus was at 0.  There will be a difference in sound.  It is the result of distortion.  not necessarily complete breaking up sounding distortion, but the busses are not being operated properly and the sound suffers because of it.  So we're saying the same thing, you just called out the root of the problem, while i stated a practical result of it running properly.

As far as feedback, if you're running within the confines of "unity" gain,  chances are frequencies are not going to jump back through the mic and feedback.  I know you'll need to make some adjustments to your graph, or whatever eq you're using, but nothing extreme.  When i walk into places, and see large -12dB cuts in a graph eq, all over the spectrum,  i don't even listen to the wedges,  i flatten it, and start over with the gainstage.  99% of the time, i'm not making any drastic cuts at all.  That has to do with noise floor, and distortion.  It all ties together.
Logged

Jeff Ekstrand

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 759
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2008, 10:31:09 am »

Quote:

As far as feedback, if you're running within the confines of "unity" gain, chances are frequencies are not going to jump back through the mic and feedback.


You sure?

I can run everything at unity in my system... but if I throw a mic in front of my PA and have an inexperienced vocal moving it all over the place, I'm still going to get feedback.

I don't think you're taking into account the room, the people, improper system design/installation, etc.

We have now gotten off-topic, but that statement seemed a little defensive and a bit of a stretch.
Logged
Jeff Ekstrand

Technical Director, North Shore Campus
Willow Creek Community Church
Northfield, IL

karl maciag

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2008, 10:43:59 am »

i didn't mean that proper gain structure was going to eliminate all feedback.  Most beginners who do not practice proper gain structure will experience more feedback due to things being to hot all over the place.  I know that you need to EQ according to the room, and all the other factors that take the gear out of a perfect environment to do their job.  I was trying to make the point that proper gain structure is the starting point to getting everything else in line, otherwise you're fighting an uphill battle the entire way.
Logged

Don Sullivan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 55
Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2008, 10:11:56 am »

My top ten lessons to learn when running sound:
1)Make sure you check the mics before somebody needs them.
2)Put new batteries in all wireless devices every Sunday morning.
3)Pull the reverb down when the music leader starts talking/praying.
4)After the pastor talks, start the music out quietly. You can ramp up the volume during the first song, but a sudden increase in volume is often perceived something being too loud.
Get a Radio shack volume meter and measure how loud your music is.
5)When a sinlge person is singing, bump them up 3-6 db. Bring them back down when the other singers join in.
6) mute/lower the choir mics when they are not singing.
7) SOLO/PFL your singers so you know who is singing melody, harmony, etc.
Cool Keep the melody on top.
9) Never give the choir monitors.
10) Get you pastor a headworn mic.  Cool
Logged

ProSoundWeb Community

Re: 10 Rules To Live By.
« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2008, 10:11:56 am »


Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.115 seconds with 22 queries.