ProSoundWeb Community

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down

Author Topic: 40 channel mixing console  (Read 6786 times)

Paul Randazzo

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 7
40 channel mixing console
« on: September 17, 2007, 08:31:05 pm »

My church is interested in purchasing a new 40 channel mixing board and a Soundcraft GB4 40 was recommended. We are not ready to go digital yet or anywhere in the near future. We are very comfortable with an analog board and have no need for a digital board. If anyone has some knowledge on this particular product or could suggest a comparable board I would greatly appreciate it.
Paul
Logged

Karl P(eterson)

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 477
Re: 40 channel mixing console
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2007, 11:38:06 pm »

Your post over in audio land should be sufficient Smile

Karl P
Logged
Audio Team Leader - CCH

Gordon Prier

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
Re: 40 channel mixing console
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2007, 12:07:38 am »

Hi Paul,

I have just installed the GB8-32 in a medium sized church and it is working well for them.  A similar product is the Allen & Heath GL2400-40 or GL2800-40.  Once you get to 40 channels I would look at the 8 subgroup mixers as these extra groups can help making mixing easier.  They may take a little while to get into but once mastered you may find that you do not want to operate without the subgroups.
Regards
Gordon Prier
Logged

Don Sullivan

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 55
Re: 40 channel mixing console
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2007, 09:56:50 am »

Really, Really Really think about going digital.
You may not think your operators have the knowledge.
They will get it.
You may think it is too complicated. It is not. In the long run, it is easier to have a fader-operator use a digital console than an analog one.

The benefits totally outweigh the learning curve.

Look  at the M7cl. Here is what you get:
48 recallable mic-preamps.
4 built in high quality effects.
4 Patchable 31 band eq's.
compression AND noise gates on EVERY input.
4 band parametric EQ + HPF on EVERY INPUT.

Copious outpus.
DIGITAL DELAY on ALL OUTPUTS! (want to cut feedback? Add 7-10 ms delays on main outputs!)

16 mix busses  + stereo mains + mono (or sub) mix buss.
Mix matrix (if you really need it)

4 stereo effects returns, 8 DCA groups,

I could go on and on.....

Then there are the cool things you simply CANNOT do easily on an ananlog desk.

Take a signal and route it into TWO input channels at the same time (WHY you ask?) Ever have your drums dialed in perfectly for a loud song, only to have them sound terrible for a later quiet song?  Take your overhead mics and bring them into the board AGAIN through a simple digital patch (no cables necessary) EQ them differently, set dynamics differently. Now you have different drum mixes available on the same board.

Really, Really Really think about going digital.








Logged

Tom Young

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1174
use real, full name when posting
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2007, 08:00:01 pm »

Please read the rules for posting here, then edit your profile so that your real, full name is displayed when you post.

Thanks.
Logged
Tom Young, Church Sound section moderator
Electroacoustic Design Services
Oxford CT
Tel: 203.888.6217
Email: dbspl@earthlink.net
www.dbspl.com

A.J. McGlynn

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 114
Re: 40 channel mixing console
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2007, 08:50:34 am »

dswpro wrote on Sun, 18 November 2007 08:56

Really, Really Really think about going digital.
You may not think your operators have the knowledge.
They will get it.
You may think it is too complicated. It is not. In the long run, it is easier to have a fader-operator use a digital console than an analog one.



Not everyone is reaqdy for digital. I can see that dswpro is excited about his M7CL but it is a complicated console for inexperienced operators. It does have great features but analog works great for smaller churches who have smaller budgets. I love my M7CL but it does have drawbacks for my volunteers. They have issues getting around on it and finding what they are wanting to do.
Logged
A.J. McGlynn, Technical Director
Grace Church
Erie, PA

Gary Creely

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 478
    • http://www.steeplesoundavl.com
Re: 40 channel mixing console
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2007, 01:54:17 pm »

Quote:


Look at the M7cl. Here is what you get:
48 recallable mic-preamps.
4 built in high quality effects.
4 Patchable 31 band eq's.
compression AND noise gates on EVERY input.
4 band parametric EQ + HPF on EVERY INPUT.

Copious outpus.
DIGITAL DELAY on ALL OUTPUTS! (want to cut feedback? Add 7-10 ms delays on main outputs!)

16 mix busses + stereo mains + mono (or sub) mix buss.
Mix matrix (if you really need it)

4 stereo effects returns, 8 DCA groups,

I could go on and on.....

Then there are the cool things you simply CANNOT do easily on an ananlog desk.




DSWpro,

Why in the world would you compare a 5k board with a 22k board? That would be like trying to convince me that a BMW M5 is better than a ford focus= of course it is it cost 4 times as much too. I agree the m7 is only as complicated as you make it. If you have sound guys that are starting from nothing than the learning curve would be similar for analog or digital, but when guys are already comfortable on analog it makes for some learning.

AJ,

The GB4 is a good choice, it is better than the mackie offering in that class IMO. I would be comfortable installing that mixer.

Logged
Gary Creely
STEEPLE SOUND
http://www.steeplesoundavl.com


James Lawford

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 22
Re: 40 channel mixing console
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2007, 06:41:58 pm »

If you can stretch to the GB8 I think it would be worth it. You get 4 stereo channels instead of 2, as well as the 4 stereo returns. Plus the auxes can be all switch pre/post on the master section. Also, the extra groups can come in handy, especially if your system is run in stereo.

I've supplied numerous GB4/8's and all satisfied customers, including a 40 channel GB8 to a Church who are especially pleased. Digital ain't everything...and this is a quality board for the money.

James Lawford
LMC Audio Systems Birmingham
Logged
James Lawford -Birmingham England

Arnold B. Krueger

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 850
    • http://www.pcavtech.com
Re: 40 channel mixing console
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2007, 01:24:26 pm »

dswpro wrote on Sun, 18 November 2007 14:56

Really, Really Really think about going digital.


Agreed.

We made our move almost three years ago, coming up from a Mackie SR32.  The ribbon cables got intermittent, we found a B-stock 02R96 for under $8K, and as they say the rest was history.

Quote:


You may not think your operators have the knowledge.



You may think that you don't have the knowledge, but the digital consoles I've looked at step out of the box with reasonable enough defaults that you can start out treating it a lot like it was a simple analog console

Quote:


They will get it.


Example: I have a 16 year old girl that uses our 02R96 to do an Awana opening with a mic and a DVD player as sources.

All she needed to learn was

(1) How to turn the sound booth on (we reduced that to one switch)
(2) how to pull up a certain scene,
(3) and how to push on the only two faders that are up at all.

Quote:


You may think it is too complicated. It is not. In the long run, it is easier to have a fader-operator use a digital console than an analog one.



Agreed. Yes, there is a ton of capability in the box, but even a sunday morning operator doesn't need how to use but a fraction of it.

Quote:


The benefits totally outweigh the learning curve.



Anybody want to price out what even just a LS9-16 would cost done in analog, even if the analog boxes were all Berhinger?

Quote:


Look  at the M7cl. Here is what you get:
48 recallable mic-preamps.
4 built in high quality effects.
4 Patchable 31 band eq's.
compression AND noise gates on EVERY input.
4 band parametric EQ + HPF on EVERY INPUT.



..and output

Quote:


Copious outputs.



Even more if you want to add outboard expansion units.

Quote:


DIGITAL DELAY on ALL OUTPUTS! (want to cut feedback? Add 7-10 ms delays on main outputs!)



Delay is an EFX function, and also on the studio outputs.

Quote:


16 mix busses  + stereo mains + mono (or sub) mix buss.
Mix matrix (if you really need it)

4 stereo effects returns, 8 DCA groups,

I could go on and on.....

Then there are the cool things you simply CANNOT do easily on an analog desk.

Take a signal and route it into TWO input channels at the same time (WHY you ask?) Ever have your drums dialed in perfectly for a loud song, only to have them sound terrible for a later quiet song?  Take your overhead mics and bring them into the board AGAIN through a simple digital patch (no cables necessary) EQ them differently, set dynamics differently. Now you have different drum mixes available on the same board.



The point that needs to be made is that most of this power is invisible to the casual operator.

Quote:


Really, Really Really think about going digital.



Agreed - especially since the LS9 series have dropped the economic bar so low.
Logged

Mac Kerr

  • SR Forums
  • Hero Member
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 718
Output delay
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2007, 01:40:58 pm »

Arnold B. Krueger wrote on Fri, 23 November 2007 13:24

Delay is an EFX function, and also on the studio outputs.
Delay is available through the FX devices, but it is also available on every output port, all the XLR outs, and all 32 slot outs.

Mac
Logged

ProSoundWeb Community

Output delay
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2007, 01:40:58 pm »


Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
 



Page created in 0.075 seconds with 22 queries.